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OneSky Newtonian - Astronomers without borders

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#2701 SteveG

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 12:42 PM

Hello All,

Name is Rob.  Have always wanted to jump in to the world of studying the evening sky.  So after researching a bit and reading reviews, I went ahead with the AWB OS130 as my first Telescope.  With wanting to set up in the yard or take camping with us in the Montana area, I think this might last me a while. I might venture in to taking pictures with also. 

 

With me as a newbie, I think my path will start with not upgrading anything yet and using only what comes with the Onesky.  I will probably focus on the Moon first and slowly go to other areas as I get comfortable.  Can anyone recommend either a really good book, website, skymaps, or whatever  I need to get familiar with starting into this hobby/study.  Let me know when you can.

Cheers,

RC

I'll second Nightwatch. It's fantastic, with some great charts that I still use today.



#2702 Mark326

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 01:56 PM

Hello All,

Name is Rob.  Have always wanted to jump in to the world of studying the evening sky.  So after researching a bit and reading reviews, I went ahead with the AWB OS130 as my first Telescope.  With wanting to set up in the yard or take camping with us in the Montana area, I think this might last me a while. I might venture in to taking pictures with also. 

 

With me as a newbie, I think my path will start with not upgrading anything yet and using only what comes with the Onesky.  I will probably focus on the Moon first and slowly go to other areas as I get comfortable.  Can anyone recommend either a really good book, website, skymaps, or whatever  I need to get familiar with starting into this hobby/study.  Let me know when you can.

Cheers,

RC

Congrats on your new OneSky, it's a great scope and will provide many excellent views.

 

Both "Turn Left at Orion" and "Nightwatch" are popular and great printed resources for new hobbyist.  Would also recommend a planetarium software such as Stellarium, it will give you an excellent perspective of what's in the night sky from your present location. Websites such as https://dso-browser.com also can recommend viewing targets based on your location, time of year, object elevation, magnitude.   Think you will find an enormous amount of available resources that are low cost and free in this hobby.

 

Thanks to Mike and AWB for ensuring this scope comes straight out of Box with useful eyepieces and intuitive dobsonian mount.  Hours of enjoyment can be had with no additional accessories.

 

Far as astrophotography, it's worth stating, the scope while capable for some imaging, it will require much patience and willingness to adapt the scope for that purpose if planning to attach camera directly.  Using a smartphone or camera for afocal should not be difficult, but prime focus applications will require tinkering with scope focal length and working through issues with helical focuser.

 

With that said, I own this scope and am using it to learn the nightsky, both visually and to learn basics of AP. Find the scope to be very capable and satisfying in every way.

Imaged on 2-22-18 with OneSky mounted on a GEM.

Trapezium Cluster 2 22 18

 

Clear Skies


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#2703 paulymo

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:58 PM

Welcome Rob!

 

As others have said, your plan is a good one.

 

I've had both Nightwatch and Turn Left at Orion in house.  You can't go wrong with either as preliminary reading and coming up to speed on things.  I found Turn Left more useful due to the sketches of DSOs by season so you know about what to expect when you find it but that's a personal preference. 

 

For lunar work, I really like Sky & Telescope's Map of the Moon at the eyepiece with me.  I use Virtual Moon Atlas--a free download--on my laptop for researching features either before or after observing.

 

For deep sky objects, I like having Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas with me at the eyepiece.  Nice and small with just about the right amount of stars shown for using with a small telescope.  Stellarium is a freeware planetarium program I use on my laptop to simulate what objects are going to be where when I plan on being out for a while.  Also makes finding the bright planets a snap.  And once you get the hang of the basics, it can help you simulate views of objects through different eyepieces in your AWB--which can help you get an idea of which eyepiece focal lengths and FOVs you'd prefer when you are ready to upgrade them.

 

Lastly, I use the Astrospheric website to predict viewing conditions for upcoming nights.  Now if only I could find a website that improves the seeing in my area...

 

Hope this helps!

 

Pauly


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#2704 darthteddy93

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 08:05 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I've got a few questions. 

 

1. I've been interested in picking up solar viewing with this telescope. In the past I've used 8x8 sheets of white light filters that were a pain to work with. They barely fit the aperture of the telescope and I had to tape it to the telescope. is there another, easier way of attaching white light solar filter film to this telescope? 

 

2. Alternatively, are there any cheap H-alpha filters that I can attach to this telescope?  

 

3. Other than sunspots, what cool stuff can I show off at star parties/outreach events? In the past, all I've seen is a featureless yellow circle. I know the sun is headed towards a minimum in its cycle. A quick google search has given me granulation and faculae. Granulation I know to be the "texture" of the sun so I can explain it that way, and faculae are white smudges. How often are faculae visible? Is there anything else I'm missing? 

 

4. Lastly, while unrelated, I've been using milk crates as my "mount" for this telescope but it's annoying to lug them all with me whenever I take my telescope somewhere. Is there a lightweight/compact mount that's affordable (<$100) that I can use for this telescope that's not a tabletop mount (I.e. a tripod)? 


Edited by darthteddy93, 03 March 2018 - 08:24 PM.

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#2705 Brapp

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 12:30 AM

Hi everyone, first time poster here! I picked up a Onesky as my first telescope and I'm loving it! Thanks to everyone for such good information!

I caught eyepiece fever and picked up a Meade Zoom and a 4mm TMB planetary clone. To be honest I'm disappointed with the TMB clone. I get better views of everything including planets when I barlow the zoom eyepiece or the 10mm kit eyepiece (easier to focus, sharper image).
I am contemplating getting a Meade 5.5mm 82 or an ES 6.7 or 4.7 for planetary viewing, but I'm hesitant to drop the $$$ because I was sort of burned by the TMB planetary clone. Will the Meade or ES provide sharper images of the planets than my kit eyepiece? Or is their real advantage just their wider FOV? I am really only interested if it's going to improve the sharpness. Otherwise I'm going to save my money for a bigger scope.

I am actually quite impressed with the supplied eyepieces. For anyone just starting out, I recommend buying just a Barlow at the beginning - I got diminishing returns from buying the zoom and the TMB, although the zoom is pretty handy.

For anyone reading this who is on the fence about getting this or a larger dobsonian (like I was recently) don't forget that this little guy does require a stool or table to rest on. If you're carrying it around the yard like me, it means you're still dragging a stool or table along with you. I often think a larger scope would actually be easier to move around the yard. The extra portability for stowing in a small house or in the car is nice though.

Thanks everyone!


Edited by Brapp, 04 March 2018 - 12:33 AM.

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#2706 Xeno

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 04:51 AM

Hi everyone, first time poster here! I picked up a Onesky as my first telescope and I'm loving it! Thanks to everyone for such good information!

I caught eyepiece fever and picked up a Meade Zoom and a 4mm TMB planetary clone. To be honest I'm disappointed with the TMB clone. I get better views of everything including planets when I barlow the zoom eyepiece or the 10mm kit eyepiece (easier to focus, sharper image).
I am contemplating getting a Meade 5.5mm 82 or an ES 6.7 or 4.7 for planetary viewing, but I'm hesitant to drop the $$$ because I was sort of burned by the TMB planetary clone. Will the Meade or ES provide sharper images of the planets than my kit eyepiece? Or is their real advantage just their wider FOV? I am really only interested if it's going to improve the sharpness. Otherwise I'm going to save my money for a bigger scope.

I am actually quite impressed with the supplied eyepieces. For anyone just starting out, I recommend buying just a Barlow at the beginning - I got diminishing returns from buying the zoom and the TMB, although the zoom is pretty handy.

For anyone reading this who is on the fence about getting this or a larger dobsonian (like I was recently) don't forget that this little guy does require a stool or table to rest on. If you're carrying it around the yard like me, it means you're still dragging a stool or table along with you. I often think a larger scope would actually be easier to move around the yard. The extra portability for stowing in a small house or in the car is nice though.

Thanks everyone!

I have the ES 4.7, it is a fantastic eyepiece in this scope for planetary. The eye relief causes less bumping of the scope, and thus less shake.  I have the Celestron 4mm.  It offers a touch more magnification, but honestly the field of view of the ES 4.7 coupled with the eye relief make it a far superior eyepiece.  The higher your magnification, the less sky you see, so the more you have to shift the scope to keep your target in view. The ES 4.7 has a much larger field of view as well as eye relief, and so it's 1) Easier to find the target, 2) Fewer shifts to keep the target in view, and 3) less accidental bumping of the scope.

 

As far as eyepiece fever.  You'll spend far less money and enjoy your time with the scope much more with 2 or 3 high quality pieces or 2 pieces and a barlow.   something like a 25 and 10ish range.. when coupled with a barlow would give you all the manification setting you really need with this scope.


Edited by Xeno, 04 March 2018 - 05:06 AM.

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#2707 clearwaterdave

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 05:19 AM

Hello Brapp.,Where you live.,your atmosphere.,.will be the deciding factor as to how much power you can use.,Here in Maine I can usually get 100-150x in my 8"dob.,To get any higher requires very good atmospheric conditions.,other wise the view is soft.,Only the moon and planets and tight doubles get me to try higher powers.,most times viewing with the OneSky I'm happy with 30-75x.,Enjoy.,
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#2708 Xeno

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 05:19 AM

I am contemplating getting a Meade 5.5mm 82 or an ES 6.7 or 4.7 for planetary viewing, but I'm hesitant to drop the $$$ because I was sort of burned by the TMB planetary clone. Will the Meade or ES provide sharper images of the planets than my kit eyepiece? Or is their real advantage just their wider FOV? I am really only interested if it's going to improve the sharpness. Otherwise I'm going to save my money for a bigger scope.
 

A bigger scope is only going to help if you have the viewing conditions that will support it. If you have a lot of light pollution then a bigger scope won't help much.  You honestly start running into diminshing returns after the 130 mm mark in my experience.  Rather than changing scope, you might be better served by changing your mount. You could mount this on  something like a Celestron CG-4 or other mount that would give you a much more stable, and height adjustable viewing platform that attaches directly to the scope. 

 

The onesky is also very nice for it's ease of transport. It's easy to take on road trips without taking up the whole trunk like a bigger scope would.


Edited by Xeno, 04 March 2018 - 05:22 AM.

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#2709 clearwaterdave

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 05:31 AM

Brapp.,you can also add legs to the OneSky and forget about the table/stand.,This still a one handed carry.,

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#2710 SeaBee1

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 08:41 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I've got a few questions. 

 

1. I've been interested in picking up solar viewing with this telescope. In the past I've used 8x8 sheets of white light filters that were a pain to work with. They barely fit the aperture of the telescope and I had to tape it to the telescope. is there another, easier way of attaching white light solar filter film to this telescope? 

 

2. Alternatively, are there any cheap H-alpha filters that I can attach to this telescope?  

 

3. Other than sunspots, what cool stuff can I show off at star parties/outreach events? In the past, all I've seen is a featureless yellow circle. I know the sun is headed towards a minimum in its cycle. A quick google search has given me granulation and faculae. Granulation I know to be the "texture" of the sun so I can explain it that way, and faculae are white smudges. How often are faculae visible? Is there anything else I'm missing? 

 

4. Lastly, while unrelated, I've been using milk crates as my "mount" for this telescope but it's annoying to lug them all with me whenever I take my telescope somewhere. Is there a lightweight/compact mount that's affordable (<$100) that I can use for this telescope that's not a tabletop mount (I.e. a tripod)? 

 

Good morning Darth! While you can use the OneSky for solar viewing, we are talking white light viewing only. And, while white light viewing can be fun, it really leaves you wanting more. I do not consider the OneSky the best choice for white light. A refractor on a GEM is better suited. You will NOT be able see much more than sun spots with the OneSky and a white light filter. As far as I know, there is no H-apha solution for viewing the chromosphere of the sun with the OneSky (or any reflector) except maybe a Quark system, but it is NOT cheap.

 

If you seriously want to do solar observing of more than sun spots, I would recommend saving your lunch money and getting a dedicated H-alpha solar scope such as a Coronado PST or a Lunt H-alpha scope, along with a decent GEM, no fuss, no muss. Let your OneSky do what it does best - looking at the night sky!

 

For your 4th question, there are tons of DIY examples of better ways to mount the OneSky in this thread.

 

Clear skies!

 

CB


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#2711 MSimmons

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 11:17 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I've got a few questions. 

 

1. I've been interested in picking up solar viewing with this telescope. In the past I've used 8x8 sheets of white light filters that were a pain to work with. They barely fit the aperture of the telescope and I had to tape it to the telescope. is there another, easier way of attaching white light solar filter film to this telescope? 

 

2. Alternatively, are there any cheap H-alpha filters that I can attach to this telescope?  

 

3. Other than sunspots, what cool stuff can I show off at star parties/outreach events? In the past, all I've seen is a featureless yellow circle. I know the sun is headed towards a minimum in its cycle. A quick google search has given me granulation and faculae. Granulation I know to be the "texture" of the sun so I can explain it that way, and faculae are white smudges. How often are faculae visible? Is there anything else I'm missing? 

 

4. Lastly, while unrelated, I've been using milk crates as my "mount" for this telescope but it's annoying to lug them all with me whenever I take my telescope somewhere. Is there a lightweight/compact mount that's affordable (<$100) that I can use for this telescope that's not a tabletop mount (I.e. a tripod)? 

 

Hi Darth,

 

I have to agree with CB that, at least for now, a white light filter isn't going to reward you much. The Sun was completely blank a week ago when I viewed it with a 12-inch f/150 tower telescope. There's a tiny spot now but you probably wouldn't see it with the OneSky. As we get closer to sunspot maximum there will be activity to show that will make it worthwhile.

 

"cheap" and "H-alpha filters" don't belong in the same sentence, unfortunately. The H-alpha scopes that CB suggests are really the best solution. I don't think you can get a separate H-alpha filter for the price of those complete scopes, and the set-up and use of them will be a real hassle. Reflectors like the OneSky with a central obstruction (the secondary mirror) require masking all but an open part of the aperture, which really needs to be done with a filter at the eyepiece end anyway to increase the focal ratio, and tuning the filter on the front or rear. If that those ideas don't have any real meaning to you at this point, know that there would be even more to learn and do. The small H-alpha scopes are wonderful performers for the price, something that seemed impossible not that long ago.

 

What you'd get in H-alpha will include features that appear in the Sun's chromosphere that can be seen more readily than in the photosphere in white light. You're not going to see granulation -- that requires a big specialized solar telescope -- but faculae and more can be seen. The real crowd-pleaser is prominences, which can be seen off the edge of the disk. They're visible on the face as well (darker features called filaments) but they're much cooler (so to speak) when seen off the edge. With so little solar activity these days you're not going to see that much even in H-alpha but there's always something.

 

I see you're in LA. Go to Griffith Observatory during the day and you can see the Sun in both white light and Ha-alpha in real time. There are plenty of online sources for images as well.

 

The other problem with the OneSky as a solar telescope is that the tube is open. You can easily cover the end of the telescope with a sheet of filter material but I'd want to make a shroud or something to cover the open part of the tube. I'm pretty sure the focused image can't get out of the tube but someone could stick their hand inside. As for ready-made filters, there are plenty that fit over the front of a normal telescope tube but the front end of the OneSky isn't round. There's a filter that goes on the inside that would work but it's really expensive. Making one from a sheet of filter material isn't that hard to do, though.

 

Mike


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#2712 Brapp

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 01:26 PM

Thank you for your responses - 

I should clarify that I am very happy with the scope so far. I feel like a little kid zooming around the sky. It's just hard not to wonder about bigger mirrors grin.gif

I live in a Bortle 4 zone, and darker skies are 30 minutes away. I just need to find a field or park I can use. I made the shroud from Michaels foam and that made a HUGE difference.

Dave, that is a neat stool - I definitely want something like that. 

My main wonder about adding a quality eyepiece is how it will perform in this scope near the center of the field. I am content nudging the scope more frequently. I'm just wondering whether I could get sharper views, say, of Jupiter's banding with something a little "better". Many in the thread have said that this scope rewards nice eyepieces. I guess the obvious answer is that I need to go to a club meeting or star party and try out different ones!



#2713 paulymo

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 01:41 PM

 

Hi everyone,

 

I've got a few questions. 

 

1. I've been interested in picking up solar viewing with this telescope. In the past I've used 8x8 sheets of white light filters that were a pain to work with. They barely fit the aperture of the telescope and I had to tape it to the telescope. is there another, easier way of attaching white light solar filter film to this telescope? 

 

2. Alternatively, are there any cheap H-alpha filters that I can attach to this telescope?  

 

3. Other than sunspots, what cool stuff can I show off at star parties/outreach events? In the past, all I've seen is a featureless yellow circle. I know the sun is headed towards a minimum in its cycle. A quick google search has given me granulation and faculae. Granulation I know to be the "texture" of the sun so I can explain it that way, and faculae are white smudges. How often are faculae visible? Is there anything else I'm missing? 

 

4. Lastly, while unrelated, I've been using milk crates as my "mount" for this telescope but it's annoying to lug them all with me whenever I take my telescope somewhere. Is there a lightweight/compact mount that's affordable (<$100) that I can use for this telescope that's not a tabletop mount (I.e. a tripod)? 

 

 

 

The other problem with the OneSky as a solar telescope is that the tube is open. You can easily cover the end of the telescope with a sheet of filter material but I'd want to make a shroud or something to cover the open part of the tube. I'm pretty sure the focused image can't get out of the tube but someone could stick their hand inside. As for ready-made filters, there are plenty that fit over the front of a normal telescope tube but the front end of the OneSky isn't round. There's a filter that goes on the inside that would work but it's really expensive. Making one from a sheet of filter material isn't that hard to do, though.

 

Mike

 

I was hoping someone would make that last point.  Solar viewing always requires an abundance of caution but doing it with an open tube scope ups the ante even more.  I'll probably go the sun funnel route for it at some point once I find a good eyepiece to use.  It would also allow many to view at the same time.


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#2714 paulymo

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 01:48 PM

My main wonder about adding a quality eyepiece is how it will perform in this scope near the center of the field. I am content nudging the scope more frequently. I'm just wondering whether I could get sharper views, say, of Jupiter's banding with something a little "better". Many in the thread have said that this scope rewards nice eyepieces. I guess the obvious answer is that I need to go to a club meeting or star party and try out different ones!

If you've got the budget, you've already got great suggestions for upgrading.  If not, there is a reason there is a saying "the more you look the more you see".  Going out with a sketchpad and drawing the planetary details you do see--even if like me you have no drawing abilities--will help you see more detail because you are more consciously looking for it. 


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#2715 SteveG

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 04:18 PM

Hi everyone, first time poster here! I picked up a Onesky as my first telescope and I'm loving it! Thanks to everyone for such good information!

I caught eyepiece fever and picked up a Meade Zoom and a 4mm TMB planetary clone. To be honest I'm disappointed with the TMB clone. I get better views of everything including planets when I barlow the zoom eyepiece or the 10mm kit eyepiece (easier to focus, sharper image).
I am contemplating getting a Meade 5.5mm 82 or an ES 6.7 or 4.7 for planetary viewing, but I'm hesitant to drop the $$$ because I was sort of burned by the TMB planetary clone. Will the Meade or ES provide sharper images of the planets than my kit eyepiece? Or is their real advantage just their wider FOV? I am really only interested if it's going to improve the sharpness. Otherwise I'm going to save my money for a bigger scope.

I am actually quite impressed with the supplied eyepieces. For anyone just starting out, I recommend buying just a Barlow at the beginning - I got diminishing returns from buying the zoom and the TMB, although the zoom is pretty handy.

For anyone reading this who is on the fence about getting this or a larger dobsonian (like I was recently) don't forget that this little guy does require a stool or table to rest on. If you're carrying it around the yard like me, it means you're still dragging a stool or table along with you. I often think a larger scope would actually be easier to move around the yard. The extra portability for stowing in a small house or in the car is nice though.

Thanks everyone!

The Meade 5.5 is getting rave reviews in the eyepiece forum. I personally believe it to be a much more suitable focal length for the OneSky over anything shorter.

 

I always try to discourage people from the TMB Planetary's. I had 3 samples and gave them all away.... they were that bad.



#2716 SteveG

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 04:22 PM

Thank you for your responses - 

I should clarify that I am very happy with the scope so far. I feel like a little kid zooming around the sky. It's just hard not to wonder about bigger mirrors grin.gif

I live in a Bortle 4 zone, and darker skies are 30 minutes away. I just need to find a field or park I can use. I made the shroud from Michaels foam and that made a HUGE difference.

Dave, that is a neat stool - I definitely want something like that. 

My main wonder about adding a quality eyepiece is how it will perform in this scope near the center of the field. I am content nudging the scope more frequently. I'm just wondering whether I could get sharper views, say, of Jupiter's banding with something a little "better". Many in the thread have said that this scope rewards nice eyepieces. I guess the obvious answer is that I need to go to a club meeting or star party and try out different ones!

Sharp views are achieved first by the telescope objective, then local atmospheric seeing, and lastly the eyepiece & your eyes. The first two I listed are the most important. If you're not getting a sharp high-power view from the plossl & barlow combo, then buying a fancier eyepiece is not going to fix it IMO.


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#2717 MarioJumanji

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 09:28 PM

Thank you for your responses -
I should clarify that I am very happy with the scope so far. I feel like a little kid zooming around the sky. It's just hard not to wonder about bigger mirrors grin.gif
I live in a Bortle 4 zone, and darker skies are 30 minutes away. I just need to find a field or park I can use. I made the shroud from Michaels foam and that made a HUGE difference.
Dave, that is a neat stool - I definitely want something like that.
My main wonder about adding a quality eyepiece is how it will perform in this scope near the center of the field. I am content nudging the scope more frequently. I'm just wondering whether I could get sharper views, say, of Jupiter's banding with something a little "better". Many in the thread have said that this scope rewards nice eyepieces. I guess the obvious answer is that I need to go to a club meeting or star party and try out different ones!


The seeing conditions will be the biggest determining factor in what kind of detail you can see. But even in the best seeing, there's only so much detail you can get from the OneSky. If you're viewing planets, light pollution isn't even an issue, really. A good eyepiece can't hurt, and you can always use it on the 10" dob you're going to buy soon. ;)

#2718 robcurtis2

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 08:57 AM

Alrighty folks, 

My AWB Onesky is on its way.  Just got the notification that it has shipped.  Woooohoooo!!   Sooo I would like to thank everyone that responded to my post with early suggestions and assistance. 

 

With that, I checked out the two suggested books those being Nightwatch and Turn Left at Orion.  With my thoughts as I stated in my earlier post, that "I will probably focus on the Moon first and slowly go to other areas as I get comfortable" I went ahead with purchasing Turn Left at Orion first cause it looks like its more of a book that builds on learning in a linear steps approach with 1. Scope  2. Moon  3. Planets  4. Deeper space  5.  Then To Infinity and Beyoonnnnnd.  I think this will be a good start and enough book for a while and I will look into Nightwatch at a later date. 

 

I will let yall know how my night sky education evolves.

Cheers,

RC


Edited by robcurtis2, 06 March 2018 - 09:02 AM.

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#2719 clearwaterdave

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 09:34 AM

Good for you RC.,If you haven't figured out what you're going to set the scope on,(table/chair,etc.) milkctares work ok.,One for the scope to sit on and one for you to sit on.,There's lots of options out there as for what to use.,good luck and enjoy., Brapp.,That isn't a stool.,the legs are attached to the base.,It's all one unit.,Very easy to build.,
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#2720 Rainguy

Rainguy

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 201
  • Joined: 03 Mar 2012
  • Loc: Lake Oswego, Oregon

Posted 08 March 2018 - 06:23 PM

Hi Guys.

 

I just received my OneSky and all is well EXCEPT that the secondary mirror is so loose that it all but swings back and forth a good 10 degrees in both direction with the most gentle of pushes. To get it locked in place where it won’t mov, I have to turn it a good quarter turn counterclockwise, but this leaves it pointed out the side at a wall and not even visible when I look down into the focuser. Not sure what to do here. I do see a small hex nut at th top that the secondary shaft screws into, should I try to loosen it, then move the secondary into its proper position lined up with the primary and then re-tighten it? I tried to move it but it seems all but welded in place and I don’t want to break anything.

 

Right now the secondary position is so far off that collimation is not possible, henc the scope at this point is useless. Very disappointed and hope someone can offer a solution that I (as DIY challenged) can make work.

 

Thanks, 

Doug

 

Mike: Any thoughts? I really really do not want to have to send this back.



#2721 MSimmons

MSimmons

    AstroGear Today

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 299
  • Joined: 17 Oct 2008
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 08 March 2018 - 06:30 PM

Hi Guys.

 

I just received my OneSky and all is well EXCEPT that the secondary mirror is so loose that it all but swings back and forth a good 10 degrees in both direction with the most gentle of pushes. To get it locked in place where it won’t mov, I have to turn it a good quarter turn counterclockwise, but this leaves it pointed out the side at a wall and not even visible when I look down into the focuser. Not sure what to do here. I do see a small hex nut at th top that the secondary shaft screws into, should I try to loosen it, then move the secondary into its proper position lined up with the primary and then re-tighten it? I tried to move it but it seems all but welded in place and I don’t want to break anything.

 

Right now the secondary position is so far off that collimation is not possible, henc the scope at this point is useless. Very disappointed and hope someone can offer a solution that I (as DIY challenged) can make work.

 

Thanks, 

Doug

 

Mike: Any thoughts? I really really do not want to have to send this back.

 

Hi Doug,

 

I've replied to your email and copied in the people who can help you out, either getting it set up right or sending a new mirror if something is defective. Either way we'll get you out under the stars asap.

 

Sorry for the trouble! We have seen this happen but very rarely. I'll leave it to Kevin of SkyWatcher to advise you, though, since he knows it best.

 

Mike


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#2722 davidparks

davidparks

    Viking 1

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  • Posts: 916
  • Joined: 20 Jul 2017
  • Loc: Battle Creek, MI - USA

Posted 08 March 2018 - 11:40 PM

Like others here, I have enjoyed this thread very much!  Thank you all for your helpful, intelligent, and generous contributions.  Following your advice for a few mods (focuser threads, light shroud), I too have enjoyed customizing my AWB OneSky.

 

I chose to mount it on a SkyProdigy mount, which features Starsense auto-alignment, GoTo, and Tracking.  I can control the mount via HandController, or wirelessly via iPad/SkySafari using the SkyPortal WiFi.  (I think CN Vendor wing&sons still offers the Skyprodigy mount for $150)

 

I have the kit configured for both visual and EAA.  For visual I use the Celestron 8-24mm zoom and Barlow.  For EAA I am  utilizing the Revolution Imager R2, which not only displays to the mounted LCD screen, but also records on a mini-DVR.  Alternatively I can wirelessly transmit the video direct to the iPad.

 

 
 

Edited by davidparks, 08 March 2018 - 11:45 PM.

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#2723 SeaBee1

SeaBee1

    Skylab

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  • Posts: 4,252
  • Joined: 19 Mar 2015
  • Loc: Under the DFW light barrier

Posted 09 March 2018 - 09:40 AM

That's a nice rig, David!

 

CB



#2724 CyberCowboy

CyberCowboy

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 122
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2015

Posted 09 March 2018 - 09:45 AM

After using my OneSky, and sharing it with my local club, this past Wednesday I proposed the club buy one itself and leave in 'out of the box state' since I've modified my OneSky pretty heavily to do astrophotography.  The motion passed unanimously.  We as a club do LOTS of outreach, including talks at schools, libraries, scouting groups and 'sidewalk astronomy' where we set up randomly in local parks and invite the public to view.  The OneSky is going to go to all these outreaches as a way to show exactly what you can get, and what you can see with it vs. the more expensive scopes, for fairly inexpensive.

A number of our members, including a retired professor from the local University, agreed it's the best bang for the buck for new people interested in the hobby.  I'm going to type up a .pdf that we're going to get printed up about the scope, and things to view with it that we'll have printed and hand out as well.  So glad I found this scope thanks to @Jlandy, and this thread makes it so much better. 

The La Crosse Area Astronomical Society is really looking forward to adding this to our toolbox, so thanks Mike and AWB for making this deal available. 

 


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#2725 lbim

lbim

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 105
  • Joined: 05 Feb 2014
  • Loc: Orlando, FL

Posted 10 March 2018 - 12:28 AM

After using my OneSky, and sharing it with my local club, this past Wednesday I proposed the club buy one itself and leave in 'out of the box state' since I've modified my OneSky pretty heavily to do astrophotography.  The motion passed unanimously.  We as a club do LOTS of outreach, including talks at schools, libraries, scouting groups and 'sidewalk astronomy' where we set up randomly in local parks and invite the public to view.  The OneSky is going to go to all these outreaches as a way to show exactly what you can get, and what you can see with it vs. the more expensive scopes, for fairly inexpensive.

A number of our members, including a retired professor from the local University, agreed it's the best bang for the buck for new people interested in the hobby.  I'm going to type up a .pdf that we're going to get printed up about the scope, and things to view with it that we'll have printed and hand out as well.  So glad I found this scope thanks to @Jlandy, and this thread makes it so much better. 

The La Crosse Area Astronomical Society is really looking forward to adding this to our toolbox, so thanks Mike and AWB for making this deal available. 

 

CyberCowboy, could you elaborate a bit on how did you "modified my OneSky pretty heavily to do astrophotography", please.

I've been trying several cameras including Atik Infinity but my experience is negative. I've invested some time in to OneSky improvements, you can see it here.

The helical focuser on OneSky is not capable to support anything heavier than eyepiece. To me it is a deal breaker. If you can share your experience it would be appreciated. I don't want to sale it yet, it has a lots of good things in it and week point - focuser.

LBIM




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