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OneSky Newtonian - Astronomers without borders

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#251 Jim7728

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Posted 04 October 2014 - 07:31 AM

 

The 6.7mm is my highest power ep that comfortably frames the entire moon in view and looked, as expected, crisp and sharp without flaws. The light still fell on the crater at a favorable angle so that the complex walls, twin peaks and the exterior rubble fields all were showing well. 97x, 1.3mm exit pupil, 51 arc' TFOV.

 

 

Great report and good to read about the ES 6.7 which I just acquired for my One Sky.

 

 

 

Finally bought a rivet gun from HDepot and put my plastic dew shield converted to light shroud inside the little dob, but noticed the interior padded portion of the modded dew shield intrudes slightly in the out fringes of the field of view (still works fine), but really like SteveG's use of Kydex  as a integrated light shroud and ordered a 12" X 48" piece from ScopeStuff.

 

AWB 2.jpg


Edited by Jim7728, 04 October 2014 - 07:33 AM.

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#252 howard929

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Posted 04 October 2014 - 07:32 AM

... just some random musings after its first light of just 40 minutes of lunar

 

Carrying the scope collapsed and fully assembled in one arm hugged to my body and a folding chair in the other hand was easy to get past 3 doors and 4 steps down to the back yard. Leaning the chair against my leg freed up one hand to open/ close doors. Couple of eyepieces in my pockets made for one trip because there was cooler already in place to set the telescope on. So a slight cheat for a one trip deal and the cooler is too tall. Something to set the telescope on that's 10" tall remains a work in progress. Noticed that the edges of the vertical portion of the base are sharp and dug ruts in my arm. No biggie, I need to file or sand those round.

 

On to "methinks yous guys made a boo-boo". I recall a couple three times in the last month or so someone, a first timer needing to make a one trip carry, through hall ways, doors and stairs and didn't really consider one of these when mentioned because there was no table available. Too bad, I feel they lost out on good advice. This is a wonderful little telescope that's only little in physical size. The views it provides are simply amazing. Besides, sitting on a chair with the telescope low to the ground for long periods is much more comfortable then standing next to it on a sturdy table that on one seems to have anyway... 


Edited by howard929, 05 October 2014 - 07:22 AM.


#253 jlandy

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 07:46 PM

here's a fun one... not the best picture, certainly not my best, but nonetheless...

 

the International Space Station!

 

(edited - forgot to add the picture info!)

 

1 shot @ ISO1600, 1/2500 sec at prime focus with the OneSky

Attached Thumbnails

  • ISS-jpeg.jpg

Edited by jlandy, 07 October 2014 - 12:01 PM.

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#254 Firewire

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 08:11 PM

How do you catch something moving that quickly Jlandy?



#255 jlandy

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 08:49 PM

Spent half an hour making sure the red dot was in really good alignment with the camera. I knew from Stellarium the ISS would be going right over Sagittarius. I held the telescope steady on the top of the teapot and snagged a bunch of pictures once it entered the red dot sight. After that I tried judging where the iss would be, held the spot, and snagged more as it passed through again. I took at least 100 quick pictures, only 5 or so turned out!



#256 azoic

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 08:16 AM

wow this is an amazing shot. i once tried to follow an airplane but hardly managed....you took a picture of the ISS....  NICE!!!


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#257 jlandy

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 09:07 AM

The weather tomorrow is looking good, the NASA site says the ISS will be visible for 6 minutes or so. I'm going to try again with video stacking, hopefully 100 or so stacked pictures will give a better result.



#258 Abhat

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 09:34 AM

Jalndy - I checked NASA website and I do see several days when its visible for few minutes around 7-8PM.

How do you find out ISS exact location before pointing the scope? Is it typically visible in finder scope or Binoculars?



#259 jlandy

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 11:47 AM

The desktop version of Stellarium will give a predicted path across the sky, I picked out a couple stars is was predicted to run through - it seemed very accurate, down to the minute it was supposed to rise off the horizon. I get about a degree (I think) worth of viewing from my camera when attached to the OneSky with the 2x barlow, the ISS ran right through the center of the first star I was sitting on.

 

If I remember right the ISS shines at mag -2 to -3 (don't quote me!); it was very bright as it came up the horizon, got brighter (about as bright as Vega?) as it got higher in the sky. My girlfriend was watching it move in my 10x50 binos no problem. Her comment was it looked just like a very bright star.



#260 Abhat

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 12:44 PM

Thanks. I will check it out in my Binos or ST-80 tomorrow before taking the Dob out. For me seeing it is the first step. Its a miracle that you were able to actually take a picture of it. 



#261 MSimmons

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 01:04 PM

wow this is an amazing shot. i once tried to follow an airplane but hardly managed....you took a picture of the ISS....  NICE!!!


I agree it's amazing! Some photographers have gotten really good at imaging it but I didn't think it was even possible following it by hand. Especially with that much detail. Really impressive!
 
 

Jalndy - I checked NASA website and I do see several days when its visible for few minutes around 7-8PM.
How do you find out ISS exact location before pointing the scope? Is it typically visible in finder scope or Binoculars?


The website Heavens Above has predictions and will show you passes a couple days in the past in case you see something and want to check it after the fact. It has all the known satellites so you can find others as well (don't expect to see detail like this on them, though). Includes circumstances and beginning, end, and maximum (altitude, azimuth, magnitude) for any satellite, and will show you what you can expect on any night.

ISS is very bright so optics aren't needed. I had a pass here recently with a maximum brightness of mag -2.5 (jlandy, you were right on with that). But I've seen it even brighter. The closer it comes to your zenith the brighter it will be since that minimizes the distance to it from your location. I saw it go right through the zenith once with the Shuttle attached and it was amazingly bright. Even when it first appears on the horizon it's very easy naked eye.

 

Not to belittle jlandy's amazing shot with the OneSky, here is what an outstanding astrophotographer who's been doing this for a long time can do with good equipment. Play the video and prepare to have your mind blown.


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#262 Abhat

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 02:29 PM

Thanks Mike. I did check the website. It is indeed very bright -2.5 to even up to -3. That is Venus/Jupiter equivalent brightness. It is going to be hard to miss unless the size is very tiny. Tomorrow's pass is pretty solid in Northeast US, going as high as 80 degrees at -3.3 mag close to Vega  at 7:48 PM. I have signed up for text alerts on NASA's website. I will check it out if the sky is clear.


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#263 MSimmons

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 02:34 PM

An ISS pass at 80 degrees altitude is not to be missed if the skies are clear. It brightens from "is that it?" to "wow, is that really it?!?!" as it comes overhead.

 

This angular size doesn't matter. It's essentially a point object so its stellar magnitude is the overall magnitude. Stars are all points, too. You'll see it.



#264 jlandy

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 02:57 PM

 

 

Not to belittle jlandy's amazing shot with the OneSky, here is what an outstanding astrophotographer who's been doing this for a long time can do with good equipment. Play the video and prepare to have your mind blown.

 

 

No belittling at all! I recently bought Legault's book, I couldn't believe the amount of detail he was getting from the ground. If anything I am honored to be in the same sentence as the guy!


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#265 howard929

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 07:04 AM

 

 

 

Not to belittle jlandy's amazing shot with the OneSky, here is what an outstanding astrophotographer who's been doing this for a long time can do with good equipment. Play the video and prepare to have your mind blown.

 

 

No belittling at all! I recently bought Legault's book, I couldn't believe the amount of detail he was getting from the ground. If anything I am honored to be in the same sentence as the guy!

 

 

FWIW I'm much more impressed with your photo taken through a $200 telescope then I am with those taken through multi-thousand dollar telescopes.


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#266 jlandy

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 08:57 AM

What I like about the ISS target is I don't think you need a complicated mount to catch it. I spent a lot of time making sure the telescope was collimated, and focused on the camera. After that it was pretty much only using the RDF and a remote shutter



#267 havasman

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 10:55 AM

Took the OneSky to a local community college plaza for a lunar eclipse viewing party this morning (4am) and had the pleasure of telling students the cost of the views was much less than they thought. A couple of the astronomy students had been saving up for a scope and suddenly realized they were there

 

Actually, the most enjoyable part was seeing how prepared, knowledgeable and engaged the high school and community college students were. Their informed interest and their "Oh, wow" and "Cool" exclamations more than compensated for the lost sleep. We showed Luna's changing face, Jupiter and his procession of moons, Betelgeuse, Pleiades and Orion's sword with its Great Nebula and Trapezium to a pleasant and appreciative audience.

 

Presenting the entire sword of Orion via the ES68 24mm and then switching to the ES82 6.7mm to bring the Trapezium into clear view pretty much lit the crowd up.

 

It was noted that, for this young crowd, none of the vistas were real enough until they were (clumsily) captured onto a phone cam.  :scratchhead:


Edited by havasman, 08 October 2014 - 11:57 AM.

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#268 MSimmons

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 01:21 PM

FWIW I'm much more impressed with your photo taken through a $200 telescope then I am with those taken through multi-thousand dollar telescopes.

 

Exactly.



#269 Firewire

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 06:51 PM

It was noted that, for this young crowd, none of the vistas were real enough until they were (clumsily) captured onto a phone cam.  :scratchhead:

 

Yep! that's pretty much what we get when we host public observatory nights at our college observatory.  People actually manage to capture some decent images of the moon on their iphones but they just hold up the lines because it takes some careful placement to get a decent image.  I'm glad you had a successful Lunar Eclipse, i myself was able to catch some of it on the onesky but the fog got in the way a bit. The onesky is amazing for studying the moon's features.  Kudos for giving some of your time to inspire future astronomers in your community! 

 

 

Does anyone have any idea where i can get nylon* eyepiece holder screws that would fit on the Onesky's adjuster?  


Edited by Firewire, 08 October 2014 - 07:49 PM.


#270 jlandy

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 07:18 PM

Without measuring the threads, I would probably start at mcmaster.com if a dedicated telescope provider doesn't have them. McMaster pretty much has everything



#271 jlandy

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 07:21 PM

so good news and bad news... bad news - I don't think video capture of the ISS is going to work for me. The thing moves waaay to quick for the video frame rate.

 

good news - with the full moon out I was able to find the spot on the rails where I don't need the 2x barlow for imaging! At f/5, 650mm focal length, the big nebula targets, all of Andromeda, and the Pleiades are now within grasp! More to come once I get her working



#272 OrdinaryLight

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 07:36 PM

Thanks to the recent posts on the ISS I was able to view the high altitude pass tonight. Wow, that's bright. I managed to track it in the scope a bit at 64x and I was able to make out some of its shape. Pretty cool.



#273 havasman

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 07:53 PM

 

 

Does anyone have any idea where i can get nylon* eyepiece holder screws that would fit on the Onesky's adjuster?  

 

 

Try Fastenal, industrial supplier of all sorts of screws, nuts & bolts, rivets, grommets ad infinitum in all sorts of configurations and materials. 



#274 BFaucett

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 08:48 PM


FWIW I'm much more impressed with your photo taken through a $200 telescope then I am with those taken through multi-thousand dollar telescopes.

 

 

 

YES, exactly right!!! 

 

 

Good job, jlandy!!!  :waytogo: :waytogo: 

 

Please continue to post some of your photos here.  I very much enjoy viewing them and reading your posts. :)  Thanks.

 

Sincerely,

-Bob F. :) :bow:



#275 BFaucett

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 09:09 PM



Took the OneSky to a local community college plaza for a lunar eclipse viewing party this morning (4am) and had the pleasure of telling students the cost of the views was much less than they thought. A couple of the astronomy students had been saving up for a scope and suddenly realized they were there.

 

Actually, the most enjoyable part was seeing how prepared, knowledgeable and engaged the high school and community college students were. Their informed interest and their "Oh, wow" and "Cool" exclamations more than compensated for the lost sleep.

 

 

COOL!  Good job!  :applause: :applause: :applause: :waytogo:

 

-Bob F.  beer2.gif




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