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OneSky Newtonian - Astronomers without borders

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#4201 Ashendar

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 06:02 AM

Hello, I recently bought the Astronomers without borders telescope for my daughter. Is it safe to say that with the 2 lenses it comes with, seeing planets and other further away celestial bodies, will be very hard to do? The moon looks great but anything else is pretty much just a light. Are there any suggestions for lenses or other things that may help without breaking the bank? I want to give her to be able to see a little bit more detail? Thank you

Check the collimation ! Also build a shroud ! The shroud has improved my visual observation by at lest 40% . For upgrades , to be honest , right now from what I've seen and tested, the cheapest best upgrade you can get is the SVBONY red lines at 130$ for the full set of 6 9 15 20 mm eyepieces with 68deg AFOV . The 20mm is my go-to eyepiece , I sometimes use a 25mm Celestron X-CEL LX but that one has a fussy cap . Then again...my setup currently looks like this :

zV1oy3Jl.jpg



#4202 rhetfield

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 09:17 AM

Hello, I recently bought the Astronomers without borders telescope for my daughter. Is it safe to say that with the 2 lenses it comes with, seeing planets and other further away celestial bodies, will be very hard to do? The moon looks great but anything else is pretty much just a light. Are there any suggestions for lenses or other things that may help without breaking the bank? I want to give her to be able to see a little bit more detail? Thank you

As others have noted, the only "big " planet to see right now is Venus.  It is generally bright and featureless.  All you really see there is the phases.  It is generally recommended to see it during the day when it is less bright.  Jupiter and Saturn will not be around until Spring.  Even then , it will be before sunrise that they come out.

 

Uranus is out during the evening.  Neptune disappears relatively early.  Even at the highest power the Onesky can reasonably do, both of those are not much more than blue dots.

 

For planets, the first thing would be a decent 2X barlow.  That on the 10mm will get you up to 130x mag.  Above that, you will see images start to get dim and grainy.  The max is generally considered to be 260x mag.  The moon will still look good at that magnification.  On a really good night, Saturn and Jupiter may look decent at that magnification.

 

One consideration would be that on most nights in most places, atmospheric turbulence will limit magnification to around 150x.

 

After getting the barlow, the next step in the planetary hunt would be a 7mm or a 5mm.  The 5mm with a barlow will max out the scope (as noted earlier - rare to get  a good enough night to see that well), but you can already get 5mm from the 10mm plus a barlow, so you would duplicate that function.  Additionally, it will be rare that you have a good enough night to see much else beside the moon decently with the 5mm+barlow.  The 7mm fills a gap between the 5mm and 10mm plus it will give a reasonable 185x mag with the barlow.

 

The other thing to consider with the Onesky is that it is good for DSO's.  These can be bigger things like andromeda galaxy, pleades, and orion.  All three are visible this time of year.  If you are in heavy light pollution, Andromeda will not be too visible, but the other two would be.  Nebula such as Orion, Dumbell, and Ring become more visible against the background if a UHC nebula filter is used.  You can add that to the wish list.

 

If you look through this thread, you will see the posts on the light shroud.  Also find the posts and threads on setting circles/degree circles.  When combined with a phone app that gives real time coordinates of objects, you can use the circles to find hundreds of objects with ease.  

 

As noted elsewhere, be good at collimation.  My onesky needed a lot of work at the beginning - the secondary was out of wack from shipping - but has not needed anything done for months.  However, as an F5, collimation is touchy and very crucial - less forgiving than other scopes.  Especially important for high magnification planetary work.  After you have the procedure down for using the cheshire piece that you were given, you will want to learn how to fine tune it using the star collimation procedure.  The star collimation at high magnification is the final step toward perfection. 


Edited by rhetfield, 15 January 2020 - 09:23 AM.

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#4203 rodgpetersen

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 01:42 PM

I’ve been fooling around with scopes, making them and using them for well over 60 years. Best advice I can give a new observer is to contact your local astronomy club, and get thee to one of their star parties. One of the lessons you will learn, is that you have to learn how to see. Honest, there is a lot to learn. One of the hardest lessons to learn is to minimize the importance of magnification.  Three times in my life I have experienced atmospherics that allowed using high magnification. Usually I’m poking around the sky at 5 to 10 times per inch of aperature, and peak out at about 25 times per inch. With our little scopes that would be our 10mm eyepiece with a 2X Barlow. I have a Televue Pronto, a little 70 mm refractor. My favorite use of this scope is with a 2” 32mm wide field, giving me about 15X with a 4 degree field of view. Sweeping the Milky Way with this combination is magical. The double cluster is awe inspiring.  Guess what I’m saying is start out at lower magnifications, learn the night sky, start off with brighter objects, the Messiers come to mind. Find a club to help you learn the ropes, give the universe time to display her wonders.


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#4204 leahdan

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 05:31 PM

Depending on the age of your daughter, we found the Celestron 8-24mm zoom to be great with our kids.  They can change magnification really easily without having to swap eyepieces and they aren't waiting around getting bored.  Add an inexpensive 2x barlow and she should be able to see all kinds of wonders.  That being said, as a parent the best way you can help, if she's younger, is to learn where some basic sights are so you can quickly find them for her and let her enjoy.  If she's older, help her learn where these are.  "Turn Left at Orion" is my go-to book and "50 things to see with a telescope KIDS" is what my 8 and 11 year old use to decide what we will look at on a given night.



#4205 davstrom

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 02:37 PM

Nfgrockerdude.,Welcome to CN.,The OneSky is very capable of showing lots of sky candy.,But first.,you need to know where to look,and what you're looking for/at.,Right now the planets are all close to the sun from our view on earth so they are not visible at night other than Venus in the early evening in  the west.,

  Get her an app such as Stellarium.,(free) and it will show what can be seen from your location each night.,

 You must realize you will not see all these colored wonders you see in books.,the galaxies and nebula are pretty much gray in a telescope..Stars will always be just a point of light.,though you can see some color in some of the stars.,

  Observing is a skill that you learn over time..the more you look.,the more you see.,good luck.,please feel free to ask any questions you have.,

The Orion Nebula and the Pleiades are great. I have seen the Orion Nebula on a recent clear night. The OneSky is great for the Pleiades with a wide field, lower power eyepiece.


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#4206 mrsjeff

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 03:13 PM

The Orion Nebula and the Pleiades are great. I have seen the Orion Nebula on a recent clear night. The OneSky is great for the Pleiades with a wide field, lower power eyepiece.


👍 Two of my favorite objects in the night sky and the OneSky is great for both.
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#4207 hiMike

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 06:23 PM

Hello, I recently bought the Astronomers without borders telescope for my daughter. Is it safe to say that with the 2 lenses it comes with, seeing planets and other further away celestial bodies, will be very hard to do? The moon looks great but anything else is pretty much just a light. Are there any suggestions for lenses or other things that may help without breaking the bank? I want to give her to be able to see a little bit more detail? Thank you

I highly recommend this barlow. You put your eyepiece into it and it doubles the zoom. Your 10mm becomes a 5mm through it which gives you 130x zoom. It also allows you to attach a DSLR camera if you ever want to do that.

There are cheaper barlows, but many will not focus in the OneSky unless you actually collapse the truss partially, which is a mega pain in the butt (the svbony ones are guilty of this). Plus the optical quality on this one is fantastic. Its worth the extra $15, I promise.

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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#4208 leahdan

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 07:33 PM

A tip for all you northern newbies - I don't know why I didn't think of this sooner but Little Hotties hand warmers!!  Why are the only clear nights since getting my little scope a balmy -27C?  It's no marathon viewing session but the hand warmers triple what I would normally be able to endure in this frigid weather.

 

20200117 191324 resized 1


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#4209 Lazaroff

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 02:18 PM

I highly recommend this barlow. You put your eyepiece into it and it doubles the zoom. Your 10mm becomes a 5mm through it which gives you 130x zoom. It also allows you to attach a DSLR camera if you ever want to do that.

There are cheaper barlows, but many will not focus in the OneSky unless you actually collapse the truss partially, which is a mega pain in the butt (the svbony ones are guilty of this). Plus the optical quality on this one is fantastic. Its worth the extra $15, I promise.

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1

A former follower of this forum, dropping in for a quick comment:

 

HiMike and I have been in contact by private message about the highlighted comment in his post. He had a lot of trouble with a Svbony-branded barlow, but not all barlows with the Svbony brand are alike. One of them is virtually identical to the Celestron barlow that hiMike recommends, and it sells on eBay for a fraction as much. I posted about it a while back. 

 

https://www.cloudyni...ders/?p=8340132

https://www.cloudyni...ders/?p=8914856

https://www.cloudyni...ders/?p=8915451


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#4210 jlcop

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 03:14 PM

I paid $14.95 for a 2X 1.25 " Svbony-branded Barlow last June. It looks to me just like the Celestron recommended by HiMike and I have had no problems using it on my OneSky.

John



#4211 davstrom

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 06:43 PM

I use the Orion Shorty 1.25" 2x Barlow Lens. Works well, maybe because I use Orion eyepieces with it. It is on sale for about $30 (they knocked off about $5).

https://www.telescop...2160/p/8711.uts


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#4212 PeterAB

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 10:34 AM

Hi,

 

I recommend printing out a copy of "The Evening Sky Map".    It is free from skymaps.com.   They put up a new version every month.

 

Look on the second page for the "Easily Seen with the Naked Eye" and "Easily Seen with Binoculars" object.   Start looking for some of those items.   As a previous poster noted,   the Pleiades star cluster is beautiful in our small scope.    The Orion nebula is also also very attractive.   The double cluster near Cassiopeia is a good target.     Double stars can be fun and are good practice to find.    There is a nice one in Cassiopeia.    The stock 25 mm eyepiece does a good job at all of these objects.

 

Starting out, I think you want to look for objects that are fairly easy to get the red dot finder on.   The "easily seen" list contains many. 

 

Jupiter is fun for me mostly because I enjoy the moons.    Saturn has the wonderful rings.   The Onesky gives nice view of both.   Unfortunately,   we need to wait for them to return to the evening sky this spring and summer.

 

A contact with an astronomy club is a great idea also.     A little navigation help goes a long way starting out. 

 

Good luck, Peter  


Edited by PeterAB, 20 January 2020 - 10:35 AM.


#4213 CinkBeast

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 10:44 AM

Hi, I’m going to keep this short. I am a beginner astronomer, and I’m looking for a good telescope. I was thinking about buying The Skywatcher Heritage 130p FlexTube, and accessories. If you own this telescope, or have eyepieces, addition preferences, please reply on my forum Starting Equipment for more info.

 

- Best Regards from The Northern Hemisphere, CinkBeast


Edited by CinkBeast, 20 January 2020 - 10:49 AM.


#4214 cookjaiii

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 12:16 PM

Hi, I’m going to keep this short. I am a beginner astronomer, and I’m looking for a good telescope. I was thinking about buying The Skywatcher Heritage 130p FlexTube, and accessories. If you own this telescope, or have eyepieces, addition preferences, please reply on my forum Starting Equipment for more info.

 

- Best Regards from The Northern Hemisphere, CinkBeast

Every scope has its advantages and disadvantages.  Many people, including me, found this to be an excellent starting scope.  

 

Small storage space, portability, stability of the mount, and wide field are a few of the advantages of the OneSky/Heritage design.  Some people prefer a solid tube and a rack and pinion focuser found on other scopes of similar size and price.  It's a personal decision without a one-size-fits-all answer.  

 

As far as accessories, a 2x Barlow for use with your 10mm MA eyepiece will give you high magnification for planets.  If you prefer a dedicated high-mag eyepiece, a 5mm will give you great views of the planets.

 

Good luck with your decision. 


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#4215 rhetfield

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 12:48 PM

Hi, I’m going to keep this short. I am a beginner astronomer, and I’m looking for a good telescope. I was thinking about buying The Skywatcher Heritage 130p FlexTube, and accessories. If you own this telescope, or have eyepieces, addition preferences, please reply on my forum Starting Equipment for more info.

 

- Best Regards from The Northern Hemisphere, CinkBeast

If you start at the top of the thread and do some binge reading, you will learn a lot on these scopes.  It was started by a beginner like you who was given one and decided to document his experience starting with the day the box came.  Lots of fun.  Remember that these scopes are meant to be tinkered with.  They do amazing things once they are tuned in well.


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#4216 BFaucett

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 06:22 PM

Hi, I’m going to keep this short. I am a beginner astronomer, and I’m looking for a good telescope. I was thinking about buying The Skywatcher Heritage 130p FlexTube, and accessories. If you own this telescope, or have eyepieces, addition preferences, please reply on my forum Starting Equipment for more info.

 

- Best Regards from The Northern Hemisphere, CinkBeast

That's redundant and unnecessary since the Skywatcher Heritage 130p FlexTube is the same scope as the AWB OneSky and this thread has over 4,000 posts concerning the AWB OneSky. 

 

Bob F. 


Edited by BFaucett, 20 January 2020 - 06:39 PM.


#4217 GoldSpider

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 05:02 PM

While my imaging rig did its thing last night at the observatory, I took out my somewhat neglected OneSky with me to do some COLD observing (much to the surprise of fellow club members who didn't think I even owned any eyepieces).  With my OneSky through an ES 24mm 68-degree eyepiece I observed (in no particular order) M42, , M45, M41, the Double Cluster, M35, M3, M51, M81/M82, Rosette (the open cluster anyway), M44, M78, M1.  Seasoned observers agree this little scope punches way above it's weight, and I think I will make this a more regular part of my imaging time.


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#4218 clearwaterdave

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 08:19 PM

Adam.,I couldn't agree more.,I like the ES 14/82 in it.,Some nights this is all I use with Skysafari plus guiding the way.,either starhopping or with my push-to system.,cheers.,



#4219 clearwaterdave

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Posted Today, 09:56 AM

I got out Wed. and last night with the OS.,Last night I used a Baader 32mm to start with.,The sisters were very nice.,I had a look at M46+47.,M46 is an open cluster which is dense with faint stars.,I replaced the 32mm with an ES,6.7/82*.,WOW,,!!.,There were clouds coming an going but when it went clear it was amazing.,I did the same with M37 and was equally pleased.,

  I have never put the power to open clusters before.,but for the smaller ones it can be a treat.,Try it.,see what ya see.,waytogo.gif


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