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OneSky Newtonian - Astronomers without borders

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#4926 clearwaterdave

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Posted 22 March 2021 - 03:29 PM

WillR Yes on the light shield,.,I attached it with 2sided tape.,

To align the circles.,First I know approx,.where North is.,so I position it then get the coordinates of something visible.,get it in my view and adjust my circle to match.,

  My legs are fixed,.I measured my eye height while seated and went from there to get the length of the legs.,I used wood crutches and screwed them to pieces I put underneath the base.,

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#4927 BlueTrane2028

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 12:48 PM

WillR cool photos, never knew about the X! Light shroud is mandatory and very satisfying to complete. Mine is made from 3mm craft foam and secured to the inside of the bezel with 2 sided velcro tape.

 

There is lots of talk on here about RDF alternatives but I'm happy with mine. Something I love are my 6mm and 9mm "gold line" eyepieces (Orion Expanse clones), these can be had for $25, $30 tops (each).  bought a $30 2x barlow when I first got the scope but now I mostly use it for moon photos and not for observing, because the gold lines came later and they are so pleasant to use. If you have a DLSR, the 2x Barlow plus a T-mount adapter for your camera body should be under $50 total. Here's a photo from last night thru the barlow.

 

The 9mm gold line is the best one and with a barlow you can get nice high magnification. Jupiter and Saturn were gone before I got mine but they are fantastic on the  moon.

Speaking of Gold Lines in general, my favorites of the line are 9 and 20mm, in all scopes.  Was using a pair of 9mms last night on the moon with my basic Orion binoviewer and my Apex 127 Mak... super sharp for the money.



#4928 WillR

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 04:22 PM

Not sure what RDF is? Slowly learning the acronyms and lingo. Also learning all about F stops, focal lengths, eye relief, AFOV, etc., etc.

 

Here is where I am after some research. Debating whether to make a short "tripod" for the Dobsonian mount to sit on ( I am a woodworker anyway), or maybe a full on tripod. Does anyone have any experience with the Orion 52587 VersaGo E-Series Altazimuth Mount Head with Tripod? Anyone put it on an equatorial mount?

 

https://www.amazon.c...ics,154&sr=1-5#

 

Looks possible, but maybe borderline for this scope? I like the idea of a tripod that can work for either sitting or standing depending on if I am alone for a longer session or with a group.

 

 

Shroud- definitely.

 

Setting circles- probably, but for now I'd like to learn to star hop using Turn Left at Orion.

 

Laser? Maybe, but if I go to setting circles I may not need it.

 

Eyepieces. Ah, here are all the choices. Looking at Svbody. The Svbody SWA 24mm is a bit more, but seems like a very nice upgrade. Barlow, yes. Svbody or Celestron? Then who knows. Maybe a 6mm? Can a 32mm be used with this scope or is the F5 too low? Maybe 24mm is ideal. A few filters. A lens case and some kind of case with a handle for the scope.

 

Thanks all for the help.

 

Will


Edited by WillR, 23 March 2021 - 04:23 PM.


#4929 Goverman

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 04:50 PM

Not sure what RDF is? Slowly learning the acronyms and lingo. Also learning all about F stops, focal lengths, eye relief, AFOV, etc., etc.
<…snip…>

The svbony 32mn is a no-brainer. It works perfectly on the Onesky / Heritage. Especially the Pleiades and Beehive (M44) are amazing with the 32mm.

What you can also try is a digital inclinometer. Use it together with an app such as stellarium: use the alt/AZ coordinates to find your target.

RDF means red dot finder, which is provided with the Onesky.



#4930 av8t0r

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 06:16 PM

Getting back into astronomy, I thought I'd want a goto mount and a large aperture, but this thread sold me on the OneSky. Learning the night sky has been a real pleasure, one that I think I would have missed with a goto. I wanted to share my current setup to recap many of the great suggestions I’ve learned in this thread.

 

First, I made the obligatory light shield (mine is heavy artist paper, which has held up fine, but will eventually get replaced by Kydex). I used Chapstick to make the focus smooth, and added a 1 1/2" flexible coupler/compression fitting to fine tune the turn resistance. An extended arm (long screw with plastic tubing) really helps with fine focusing (as Lazaroff recently explained); I can get very close to focus on any given eyepiece by position alone, and it's much easier to find and set in the dark.

 

IMG 5041

 

 

I added a green Pitny laser to the red-dot shoe with a small adapter (20mm to 11mm). Once aligned, it’s never strayed and has had no problem in 20 degree weather. Flicking on for a 1/4 second, I can get very close to any target. I appreciate the warnings about aircraft (and star parties), but for me, it’s so much better than the red-dot finder.

 

IMG 5039

 

 

Some small gray plastic caps (used on the exposed ends of metal shelving) added to the longer set screws on the primary mirror keep them from denting the tabletop mount, or catching in the carry case.

 

IMG 5044

 

 

What really makes it travel worthy, is a Stellarvue M1V mount (thanks will_s!), on a Manfrotto 190 Go tripod.

 

IMG 5037
IMG 5045
 
 

I thought this combination might be a compromise of stability for weight, but I’ve been really pleased with how solid it is, and how easy to use even without slow motion controls. Best of all, the scope, and mount fit easily in a Vivitar VIV-RGC-12 case (h/t to The Opportune Astronomer). 

 

IMG 5019
IMG 5020
IMG 5026

 

 

A 6” compass mounted on a plastic lid and cut to fit the Manfrotto mount head, along with a digital inclinometer for alt settings, make this close to a goto setup. I put it on close to north using the small white tape, then align to Polaris and set the ring.

 

IMG 5029

 

 

I modified the Stellarvue with a compression ring for a little added security. It allowed me to make an azimuth pointer (that folds) and friction screw to counteract any tendency of wind to turn the scope. I also added a bubble level and small red light to easily check the Az setting.

 

IMG 5034

 

 

The Stellarvue/Manfrotto combination is very flexible, allowing standing and sitting viewing with full Alt movement. A Helix travel chair also fits in the case.

 

IMG 5048

 

 

I can have the whole thing setup and ready for viewing in less than five minutes. It’s hard to imagine more scope for the space than the OneSky. Thanks again for everyone's great ideas and inspiration!


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#4931 Virtus

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 06:46 PM

Getting back into astronomy,

<...snip...>

 

This is an amazing set-up! Well done.

 

I have a similar tripod made by Vanguard and had been wondering if I could use it for a scope.


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#4932 rhetfield

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 06:47 PM

I like that setup. Instead of the caps on the collimation screws, I glued rubber stoppers to the back of the tube. I wonder if not using the collimation screws as feet help with maintaining collimation. I rarely have to touch collimation.

My travel tripod has a hook at the bottom to hang a weight. That reduces vibration. I use a 1 quart water bottle as the weight.

Edited by rhetfield, 23 March 2021 - 06:51 PM.

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#4933 WillR

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 07:24 PM

The svbony 32mn is a no-brainer.

<...snip...>

Oh duh, red dot finder. I knew that.blush.gif



#4934 jlcop

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 07:27 PM

"Instead of the caps on the collimation screws, I glued rubber stoppers to the back of the tube. I wonder if not using the collimation screws as feet help with maintaining collimation. I rarely have to touch collimation."

My experience is that the One Sky keeps collimation very well regardless. I've made no mods to mine other than a a shroud and rarely have to collimate.

John


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#4935 greenjuice

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 08:22 PM

Getting back into astronomy,
<...snip...>

Excellent job there av8tOr, I made many of the same choices that you did.

The Artists black poster board worked well and you didn’t have to disassemble the tube, just roll it up and tape it together once inside. The pinty laser fit perfectly on the existing red dot shoe, with the right adaptors.

I eventually mounted it on a twilight 1 mount because I wanted the slow mo controls but the stock mount was great too.

Don’t have it any more, gave it to a kid with no money, I miss it.


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#4936 av8t0r

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 08:39 PM

I used a Twilight I initially, and I like the slow motion controls. I was not sure I'd want to use the Stellarvue/Manfrotto all the time, but I really prefer it now. I can't say if other tripods would work as well, but the Manfrotto is rock solid. I'd thought about the DwarfStar mount, but I found the Stellarvue first, and it certainly works well.

A water jug for weight is a great idea, but my tripod does not have a hook, and so far I don't feel the need, even at high power. It took a little while to relax with the scope on such a light mount, but I feel very confident in it now, though I'm not sure I'd trust it at star parties!

My OneSky seemed to need collimation every time I used it for awhile, but lately it's been perfect, though I still check it each time I'm going to be viewing. Maybe it's settled in?



#4937 rodney j johnson jr

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Posted 23 March 2021 - 10:00 PM

I brought the telescope to rhode island's frosty drew observatory last night, and with some help found three new objects!

<...snip...>

dude, you are kicking............our........ butts!



#4938 rhetfield

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Posted 24 March 2021 - 08:02 AM

My OneSky seemed to need collimation every time I used it for awhile, but lately it's been perfect, though I still check it each time I'm going to be viewing. Maybe it's settled in?

Mine settled down after the first mirror wash.  I think that maybe they had the mirror clips a bit too loose.  I tend to leave much less of a gap than what it had from the factory.


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#4939 SteveG

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Posted 24 March 2021 - 12:44 PM

Not sure what RDF is?

<...snip...>

By now I'm sure you've seen post #4930. His storage bag looks perfect.

 

That alt/az head and little tripod in your link won't support the OneSky.

A laser is an excellent addition to the OneSky.

I've never used setting circles. You'll be fine without them.



#4940 rhetfield

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Posted 24 March 2021 - 01:33 PM

By now I'm sure you've seen post #4930. His storage bag looks perfect.

<...snip...>

Any reason why the tripod in his link won't support it?  The OneSky OTA is only 7 lbs and the tripod/mount is rated for 11.  Might not be good for AP, but I would think it would be OK for visual.  Much beefier than what I have for a travel tripod.  My bigger concern is that it does not fold up as compact as I would like.



#4941 SteveG

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Posted 24 March 2021 - 01:58 PM

Any reason why the tripod in his link won't support it?  <...snip...>

I've seen previous posts about that $100 tripod & head. Most say it is not stable with anything on it. YMMV.

 

I use a Porta II mount with the stock aluminum tripod. Unfortunately anything stable will not be small. The exception is a super high quality photo tripod, but they cost $500. 



#4942 Lazaroff

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Posted 24 March 2021 - 09:23 PM

Getting back into astronomy, I thought I'd want a goto mount and a large aperture, but this thread sold me on the OneSky. Learning the night sky has been a real pleasure, one that I think I would have missed with a goto. I wanted to share my current setup to recap many of the great suggestions I’ve learned in this thread.

That's a very nice setup. 

 

Glad the long post on the focuser has proved useful. It brings out the advantages of that helical focuser, which I think is one of the OneSky's strong points--not a weakness, as some say.

 

I can endorse that Vivitar case. I bought one of them too. (I saw it on the same website you did.) It's just about ideal for the OneSky. Unfortunately, it was too large to fit under the seat of my VW camper, so I had to give it up!

 

The smaller case I settled on isn't quite wide enough for the OneSky to fit in it, with the primary's lock screws sticking out, so I replaced them with shorter, Phillips-head screws. I hardly ever have to collimate.

 

The other change I made to the rear of the scope was to remove the thin, black disk behind the mirror--the one with the label on it. I figured it must lengthen the time it takes for the mirror to cool down (or heat up). 

 

I have some questions about that Stellarvue mount, but no time to ask them right now.


Edited by Lazaroff, 24 March 2021 - 09:24 PM.

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#4943 av8t0r

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 09:44 AM

 

Glad the long post on the focuser has proved useful. It brings out the advantages of that helical focuser, which I think is one of the OneSky's strong points--not a weakness, as some say.

 

 

I like the helical focuser, especially once the chapstick, compression ring and longer arm make it more precise. The one fault I see with it is the flex with larger lenses. If the cantilever had been a little stronger, I think it would have improved the whole design. I can envision a piece fitting under the current eyepiece holder to stiffen It and add a bit of light shield. Now if I could just design for a 3D printer...

 

One other thing that has made it better is the use of parafocal rings. Not only do they make switching the eyepieces quick, but since they raise them in the focuser, there’s less chance of accidentally turning the assembly so far it falls out.    



#4944 Richie2shoes

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 10:09 AM

I like the helical focuser,

<…snip…>   

Stargazer posted a link for an eyepiece holder brace a few pages back.  A buddy printed it for me, but I haven't picked it up yet or tested it. 

 

https://www.thingive...m/thing:2731885


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#4945 Lazaroff

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 10:17 AM

I like the helical focuser,
<…snip…>

That's an interesting idea about strengthening the mount for the focuser, though there isn't much room under there to work with, as I'm sure you've noticed. I also wonder whether more of the movement under the weight of an eyepiece isn't flexure of the plastic ring at the top of the scope. I remember investigating this early on. I found that if I put pressure on the focuser I could see movement of the secondary and its mount. I wondered whether this might have a bad effect on collimation, so I put the collimating eyepiece in the focuser and pressed on the focuser again. Surprisingly, I saw very  little change in the alignment. Since then I've considered the whole thing a non-issue, but it might be different for you because you're using heavier eyepieces (or for someone attaching a camera).

 

I think the real weak point of the scope is the single-stalk secondary mount. It's very easy for it to go out of whack if the scope is jarred. It might be very helpful to install a spider mount, but I don't believe I've ever seen a post describing that modification. If done right, it could stabilize the structure at the top of the scope against flexure.

 

Fortunately, the few eyepieces I use are all close to parfocal, even with the barlow lens I've chosen.


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#4946 av8t0r

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 11:00 AM

Stargazer posted a link for an eyepiece holder brace a few pages back.  A buddy printed it for me, but I haven't picked it up yet or tested it. 

 

https://www.thingive...m/thing:2731885

I missed this; it looks promising. I’d thought about a brace across the extension tubes, but wasn’t sure how to deal with it obstructing the closure. The clip on is brilliant. I’ll be interested to hear how it works for you. 
 

Lazaroff, I think it may be true that the focus cantilever itself is not the weak point; that weight flexes both it and the secondary. Another support to the secondary would probably help. It’s not real noticeable even with my heaviest eyepiece, I just want the best views possible with the scope.


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#4947 SteveG

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 11:26 AM

 

I think the real weak point of the scope is the single-stalk secondary mount. It's very easy for it to go out of whack if the scope is jarred. It might be very helpful to install a spider mount, but I don't believe I've ever seen a post describing that modification. If done right, it could stabilize the structure at the top of the scope against flexure.

 

 

That stalk should be very tight, so that it doesn’t move no matter what. If yours is moving, it’s too loose.



#4948 Lazaroff

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 11:43 AM

That stalk should be very tight, so that it doesn’t move no matter what. If yours is moving, it’s too loose.

The stalk doesn't twist or or move in relation to the surface of the plastic ring to which it's attached. However, the whole plastic ring flexes slightly if enough pressure is applied to it by a heavy object attached to the focuser, and the flexing ring moves the stalk with it. This has nothing to do with how tightly the stalk is attached.

 

In any case, the movement is slight and seems to have little influence on the scope's visual performance, though it has worried some OneSky users.



#4949 SteveG

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 11:48 AM

The stalk doesn't twist or or move in relation to the surface of the plastic ring to which it's attached. However, the whole plastic ring flexes slightly if enough pressure is applied to it by a heavy object attached to the focuser, and the flexing ring moves the stalk with it. This has nothing to do with how tightly the stalk is attached.

 

In any case, the movement is slight and seems to have little influence on the scope's visual performance, though it has worried some OneSky users.

Yes, that flexure is not an issue. I’ve read some posts here where the vane was loose, which is what I thought you were discussing when you said “weak point”.



#4950 Lazaroff

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 12:31 PM

Yes, that flexure is not an issue. I’ve read some posts here where the vane was loose, which is what I thought you were discussing when you said “weak point”.

We're on the same page.

 

Just to clarify, I called the single-stalk the scope's weak point because so many OneSky users have had issues with it. Even if the stalk is good and tight, it can twist or become angled at its connection to the plastic ring if the scope receives a strong enough blow. This happens sometimes in shipping, as posts in this topic show, and it happened to me once when I banged the scope accidentally. In at least one case described under this topic, the barrel-shaped part of the secondary mount became loose and twisted on the shaft.

 

This the reason I think a spider mount would be an improvement. Bracing the plastic ring against flexure would be a bonus, but less important. However, I'm content to leave things as they are and do my best not to whomp my OneSky in the dark. 




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