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Saturn

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#1 Phil

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 08:29 AM

Hi, I was wondering if it should be possible to make out Saturn's rings using 16x50 bino's? (or at least to notice that there is something odd about it). I had a look the other night, but what I thought should be Saturn looked like a slightly golden star (it may well have been a star - I'm just learning!). Is this all i can expect, or was i probably looking at the wrong object? I managed to find Jupiter with no problem. It resolved as a small, but clear disk. I live in London, so the sky isn't exactly ideal.
Thanks. :o

#2 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 09:58 AM

Hello Phil,

A 16x50 binocular with the Fully-Multi Coatings will get Saturn resolved (showing the rings) with Ideal skies!
I know some of the others have seen Saturn resolved with a 15x70 Oberwerk Binocular.
Happy Hunting!
P.S.- What brand 16x50 do you own?
Ray A.

#3 Phil

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 11:51 AM

I have a pair of Pentax XCF 16x50. I think they are OK, but obviously not top of the range.

#4 EdZ

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 12:33 PM

You should be able to tell the elongation of the rings and possible see a little black space between the rings and the disk at the widest part.

I can see the black space with my Obie 15x70s and Pentax 16x60s but not with my Pentax 12x50s.

edz

#5 KennyJ

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 01:15 PM

In my experience it takes at least 20x to see the most diminuitive version of the image we are all so familiar with, and only then in very good conditions with a rock steady image.

30x does the trick much better in average to poor conditions.

That said I can even distinguish Saturn from any other celestial object through my very good 7 x 42s , so I suspect you could have been looking at the wrong object in this case.

Try again tonight if it's clear and you should be able to at last see it having the appearance of having "ears"

Regards --Kenny.

#6 rboe

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 09:28 PM

I can barely make out the oblong look of Saturn with my 15X70's. When I first got them I couldn't. But my collimation skills are getting a bit better so I think that helped.

#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 11:28 PM

I'm able to rather easily make out the shape in my Oberwerk 12x60s, but there's not a hint of separation or detail as expected.

Maybe it's just an astigmatism? :)

#8 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 08:13 AM

I took a look of Saturn last night for the first time with my 22x100 obies and I definitely could see an elongated appearance. Sometimes I thought I could make out the black void between the rings and the disk...maybe that was just wishful thinking!


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