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Recommendation for child's first bino's

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#1 Jarad

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 11:21 AM

Hi all -

My nephew is turning 5 soon, and he is interested in astronomy. I would like to get him a decent pair of binoculars. Since he is only 5 (i.e. little hands and little biceps) I was thinknig of something like a pair of 10x40's so they will be light enough for him to hold. Also, since he is 5 and likely to drop, bang, or otherwise not take the best care of them, I don't want a high-end pair, just something decent (not a toy, but nothing over $100). He will probably use it on the moon and birds during the day. Anyone have any recommendations for something in this range?

Thanks,

Jarad


#2 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 11:32 AM

Maybe you should get him an even smaller pair. Some adults have difficulty holding a 10x pair still; I wouldn't expect your four year old nephew to hold them still. Consider 6x or 7x magnification, this will give the added benifit of larger field of view. I can't suggest any specific binoculars, but you should see how much he can comfortably hold. Weight is probably the most important thing, but exit pupil should also be considered. The bigger the exit pupil, the easier it will be for him to match with his eyes.

#3 Erik D

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 11:37 AM

Jarad,

I like to visit <eagleoptics.com> and <adorama.com> for specs and prices on binos. Both sites list weight, dimension, and features: WP, Close focus, RP/PP etc. Adorama probably has a bigger selection of binos under $100. Some Bushnells (don't laugh) and Minolta waterproof binos looks pretty rugged.

You can visit <excelsis.com> bino review section for brief comments on many models. 10X40s usually have 5-6 deg FOV. You may want to consider 8X32 or 8X40s with wider FOV. It will be easier for him to find his way around the night sky. You can't really see much detail with binos under 15X. Might as well go for wider FOV.

Erik D

#4 EdZ

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 12:39 PM

I think it's a good recommendation above to get a smaller pair.

Two I could recommend from having used are the Swift Ultralite 8x42, an excellent binocular with a very small IPD potential(52mm) but that's prpbably a little to costly at maybe $180new. The other would be the Minolts Activa 7x35, sometimes available for $100 +/- on Astromart.

Pay close attention to IPD for a small child. Adults can range from 58mm to 67mm, but children can be way down around 58mm to 52mm. Most binocs only go down to 58-57.

edz

#5 kfred

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 12:39 PM


I would recommend Orions's 10x30 compact travel sport binos for your nephew.

Their very good quality for only $35, and I don't think you will find a better pair...but you might!

Here's the info:

TravelSportâ„¢ 10x30 WA Compact Binocular
Prism type Porro, BAK-4
Anti-reflective coatings Fully coated
Magnification 10x
Eye relief 15.3mm
Objective Lens Diameter 30mm
Field of view 6.5°
Near focus 10 ft.
Exit Pupil 3.0mm
Physical Parameters
Weight 15 oz.
Height 4.6 in.
Tripod Adaptable No
Accessories
Included accessories Soft case and neck strap


Hope this helps.

Fred


#6 KennyJ

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 01:31 PM

Great shout by Kfred !

PROVIDING the all -important minimum inter -pupillary distance is narrow enough the child.

I had to settle for "toy" plastic 6 x 30s when I was that age -- but at least the experience prepared me well for my Chinese refractor :-)

Actually it's not THAT bad REALLY -- I suppose

-- well maybe it is

---but then again :-)

Regards -- Kenny



Regards -- Kenny.

#7 Jarad

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 02:11 PM

Thanks for all the advice guys! I will definitely check the IPD before I buy (I hadn't thought of that issue before - glad I posted for advice). I want to get him a little bit of aperture, so I will look around on Astromart for those 8x42's, and check out the Orion 10x30's too.

Jarad


#8 Jarad

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 03:31 PM

Found the Swift's on Astromart (7x42's instead of 8, but should do).

Thanks, guys!

Jarad


#9 sftonkin

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 05:05 PM

FWIW I started my daughter (then 6) with a 6x30. Reasonable exit pupil, and not too much magnification. I think 10x is too much for a young child (it's too much for many adults until they learn how to hold the bins steady).


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