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New Zeiss Fluorite Binos

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#1 KennyJ

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 02:07 PM

Well friends,

Hot off the press from a poster at Astromart , the new Zeiss "APO" binos I promised would be arriving soon have arrived in the market place.

http://www.optik-roe...y_fl_-_neu!.htm

I am both surprised and dissapointed that all three models are in fact 42mm ( in 7x 8x or 10x )

I would have thought that to make the most of fluorite glass, higher magnification and larger objectives would have been a more sensible alternative ?

Regards --Kenny.



#2 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 03:06 PM

You might be right. However, these seem to rectify some of the shortcomings of the Victory line. They look to have an improved armour, normal eye cups and normal strap lugs c.f. Leica and Swarovski. I noticed that the 7x42 has an incredible field of view as per your Zeiss 7x42 Classic.

It would be nice if Zeiss were back in the running.

Mmmm. I'd better not visit an optics dealer when they appear.

#3 lighttrap

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 03:16 PM

This is just a personal opinion, but I question the need for flourite (or HD, ED or APO) in any lens system using less than about 60mm and less than about 15x. Even that, may be a good bit too conservative. Let me put it this way, the color wasn't the noticeable thing when using a non-ED Nikon Fieldscope III at 25x60mm. I can understand the need for ED or flourite in large astro binoculars, but at 7x42, I really doubt whether it'd make much perceptible difference. The new Zeiss may well be great binoculars, but I agree that this might just possibly be more of a marketing campaign than anything else.

Note: I have NOT used the binoculars in question, so all of this is just an educated opinion.

Mike Swaim

#4 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 03:44 PM

You might be right about the lack of a need for low dispersion glass. I suspect the result will be a subtle but perceptible improvement in contrast and definition. It will be interesting to see.

#5 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 04:57 PM

I note that these aren't due until May this year.

Prices look reasonable though - 1361 Euro for the 10 x 42s

I wonder how much they will cost when they reach these shores.

Bruce

#6 KennyJ

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 05:04 PM

With regard to UK prices , I've no doubt by the time they arriveth in the shops we can add another 10% BEFORE the dreaded VAT kicks in.

The most annoying thing about VAT is that when it was first introduced , it was supposed to be non -applicable to ESSENTIAL goods , such as food and binoculars !

Regards -- Kenny.



#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 09:11 PM

My contact at Zeiss wrote me today NV42T FLs (USA model) close focus 6.5 ft, the best edge to edge sharpness and highest center field resolution of any Zeiss product(in its class) to date! So I will return my 8x42 Ultravids and wait for the new Zeiss.

#8 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 27 February 2004 - 01:54 AM

Ken

Don't forget that you can buy direct from Germany from anywhere in the EU, so that price should be the same.
Or at least you can in theory, despite what UK retailers may say - Single European Market etc.

I was thinking of certain telescope/binocular retailers based here in the UK and their wayward pricing policies.

:(


Bruce

#9 brocknroller

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Posted 27 February 2004 - 07:52 PM

Up until recently, I was of the same opinion as Mike about ED glass being overkill at lower powers (less than 15X) and apertures smaller than 60mm. I based this on comparing an 8.5X44 ED to a non-ED Audubon (very close) and the 9.5X44 Celestron ED I had, which didn't knock my socks off. However, I recently purchased an Eagle Optics 10X50 Voyager ED, which was made by Celestron. Physically, it looks very similar to the 9.5X44 model, except black armoring instead of gray. Optically, it's much better than the 44mm model (although I may have had a bad unit, the quality was inconsistent from what I've heard).

I compared the 10X50 Voyager ED to a Nikon 10X42 SE, and it compared more favorably than I expected, almost as sharp, and the color saturation is noticeably better. The ED has a "snap" to the image, like Fuji color film gives autumn foliage photos.

The ED has a smaller FOV (5*) than the SE (6*). The edges are decent though not as good as the SE, which are sharp to the edge, and the ED shows more distortion across the field. But boy, that color saturation looks great on Cardinals, which appear almost luminescent. Can't wait until the colorful migrant birds return (I thought I heard a Robin today, though it seems unlikely). However, I did see some chipmunks for the first time this year (and saved one from the jaws of my neighor's cat!).

I was expecting the Voyager to be about the same quality as the Ultima, with less false color, but the clarity and color saturation are exceptional. It also has great depth of field, though a long close focus (about 20 ft.). For astronomy, I like the SE better, because of the flatter field and better ergonomics (the ED is front heavy so I have to shift my hands forward). On the Moon, the SE's on-axis color correction is very good, on par with the ED, but for birding, the EDs produce more vibrant images, which seems to enhance the feather detail. Even grayish snowbirds seemed to have more zip, so did the evergreen tree I was vieiwing them in. Also, no false color against snow. This bin was a prototype, I'm told. Don't know why EO decided not to sell them.

Now that I've lowered my limit for ED bins to 10X50, I'm curious about the new 10X42mm flourite Victory (esp. if Zeiss replaced the smelly rubber tire armor). The body looks like a hybrid between the Classic and the Victory II. But since it costs over $1,000 more than my Voyager ED, I'll just have to remain curious!


#10 moynihan

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Posted 28 February 2004 - 11:08 AM

I recently purchased an Eagle Optics 10X50 Voyager ED, which was made by Celestron. This bin was a prototype, I'm told. Don't know why EO decided not to sell them.
...


Darn. Unavailable? antone seen these anywhere else?

for birding, the EDs produce more vibrant images, which seems to enhance the feather detail. Even grayish snowbirds seemed to have more zip, so did the evergreen tree I was vieiwing them in. Also, no false color against snow.


Same as my experience with my Swift 8.5x44 ED's, evidently a good pair.


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