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4x22 first light

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#1 Astrojensen

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 02:20 PM

Hello all

 

Yesterday evening, I had the chance to finally use my new 4x22 ultra wide-field binoculars. They have 68° apparent field of view and 17° true field of view, enough for whole constellations. They appear to be made in China and sold under various brand names. Mine came from Holland via a generous CN member, Starcees, who gave them to me.

 

I received them just after the Moon began to dominate the evening sky and after a few sessions in various degrees of moonlight, it was apparent that they were sharp and bright, so I was really eager to try them out under some dark, clear skies. Unfortunately, the weather turned for the worse, but yesterday evening, I had a spot of luck and could try them out on a dark, moonless sky, through some sucker holes. Clouds came and went and I constantly had to change targets. Distant lightning flashed regularly. 

 

So, what do such small binoculars do?

 

The Milky Way is ultra super stunning in them from a dark site. I just can't say this enough. It was breathtakingly beautiful. Dark nebulae and starclouds everywhere. The area from Cassiopeia and through Cygnus was simply beyond description. 

 

Messier objects are small, but many are visible. Very large open clusters, such as M34 and M39, that loose a lot of their splendor in even a small telescope at modest magnification really looked like open clusters. M31 was splendid, with M32 suspected in moments. I couldn't get really deeply dark adapted, because distant lightning kept flashing and illuminating the clouds. M33 was distinctly visible. I suspected M81. I think M101 might be visible. M13 and M92 could be seen as small, fuzzy blobs. M27 was visible as a tiny glow. NGC 7789 in Cassiopeia was a tiny fuzzball. NGC 663 could also be glimpsed. 

 

But I kept going back to the Milky Way and just swept it again and again. It was like observing it again for the very first time. I can't even begin to imagine how good it must be on a truly great night. I get goosebumps already, just thinking about it. Yes, it really was that good. 

 

The outer edges of the field aren't pretty, but as long as you look near the center 50% of the field and pan the binoculars around to center objects, you don't notice it, because our peripheral vision is so unsharp in itself. If you do this, the field looks gorgeously sharp and it becomes almost like bionic vision. The Milky Way suddenly looks like it does in poetry, resolved into literally countless stars. It is simply fantastic. This binocular does the Milky Way justice like no other I've ever seen (but I haven't tried the Vixen SG 2.1x42 or Widebino 2.3x42 - yet!). A pair of these should belong in any stargazer's collection, simply for its amazing Milky Way views.

 

More will come, when I get a truly fine night, or get some other interesting observations in.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark 



#2 Mark9473

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 05:05 PM

Is this your 4x22 Thomas?
http://www.cameranu....rrekijker-zwart

#3 penguinx64

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:10 PM

I'm a big fan of Wide Angle binoculars.  Sometimes my 7x35 9.3 degree Nikons aren't wide enough!  And forget about binoculars with a field of view narrower than 7.1 degrees or 375ft at 1000yds at less than 10x magnification.  If I can't see at least 2 stars in Cassiopia, then the field of view is not wide enough. 



#4 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 10:27 PM

Now I'll have to put my 4X22 optics into the 90 degree configuration that's been percolating on the back burner for several years.



#5 ronharper

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 11:58 PM

Thomas,

 

That is the most inspiring report in some time, and I trust your opinion from way back.  Of course it's only what one should expect of a decent 4x22.  Getting a 4x22 right shouldn't be rocket science, but kudos to the Chinese who understood what such a specification could do and built it.  I am happy for you, and envious, and want to see it with my own eyes now. 

 

Ron


Edited by ronharper, 19 August 2014 - 11:59 PM.


#6 Guilherme Lessa

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 12:52 AM

Very nice, inspired and interesting report, Thomas.

#7 Astrojensen

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 02:16 AM

Is this your 4x22 Thomas?
http://www.cameranu....rrekijker-zwart

Hi Mark

 

Yes, that's them. For that price, run out and buy them. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#8 Astrojensen

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 02:17 AM

Thanks for the kind comments, guys.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#9 Grimnir

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 02:51 AM

Thomas,

 

Are they fixed focus?

 

Graham



#10 Astrojensen

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 03:18 AM

Hi Graham

 

No, they have wonderfully smooth individual focus eyepieces, with nice rubber eyecups.. Works really nice! The eyepieces are quite large, larger than the objectives. The field stop is nice and sharp and the view is free from dust specs. The quality is quite amazing for the price and a clear step up from many of the ubiqutious 8x21 binoculars I've seen. It's also a fair bit bigger and heavier, due to the much bigger prisms. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#11 Astrojensen

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 03:18 AM

Prisms are BaK4, BTW.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#12 Grimnir

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 03:47 AM

Thomas,

 

Ok thanks. I know this bino comes in fixed and IF versions and the Dutch website (when translated by Google) says:

 

"The  Libra 4x22 WA SuperView  is a compact, waterproof binoculars with a fixed focus, and a 4X magnification. The binoculars have a wide field of view and is easy to operate with the focus rings on both eyepieces."

 

 

so they seemingly have both in stock.

 

Graham



#13 Grimnir

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 05:02 AM

I have spoken to the Dutch vendor and they only have the fixed focus version :-(

 

Graham



#14 JustaBoy

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 12:04 PM

Hi Thomas,

 

Have you checked the IPD on these?

 

 

Thanks,



#15 Astrojensen

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 03:09 PM

No, but I did just now. 56mm - 70mm. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#16 JustaBoy

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 03:27 PM

That's about what I figured, so that leaves me out.

 

I'm at 74mm

 

Thanks for checking, Thomas, I really appreciate it.



#17 Astrojensen

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 02:32 AM

Oh, sorry to hear that. I have very narrow IPD, so when I was young, I often had troubles with binoculars not being able to get the eyepieces close enough together. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#18 stargazer193857

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Posted 08 November 2015 - 11:36 AM

These binoculars have look alikes floating around for under $10. I'm sure quality varies with price.



#19 SMark

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 03:31 AM

I've never seen it for that price, FF or IF. If another one floats by, please post about it here. There are more than a few of us who would jump all over one priced that low...



#20 stargazer193857

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 01:10 PM

It was part of a Vivitar "buy a 10x, get a 4x free" deal. The 4x looked like this one, but was it this one or a Galilean look alike?



#21 SMark

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 03:09 PM

Yes, that one is a Galilean look alike. 



#22 Vincent33

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 08:07 AM

Is this your 4x22 Thomas?
http://www.cameranu....rrekijker-zwart

I don't think. Your link points to a 7x18.

Still waiting for an image of the 4x22 and to understand what kind of beast should it be. Galileian? Prismatic?



#23 Astrojensen

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 08:27 AM

 

Is this your 4x22 Thomas?
http://www.cameranu....rrekijker-zwart

I don't think. Your link points to a 7x18.

Still waiting for an image of the 4x22 and to understand what kind of beast should it be. Galileian? Prismatic?

 

Hi Vincent

 

They're porro prism binoculars. They are identical to these:

 

http://www.kasai-tra...perview4x22.htm

 

There's a nice drawing of the optical layout included in the manual, but I'm not sure I'm allowed to scan it and upload it.

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark



#24 BillP

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 10:14 AM

Thomas,

 

Have you ever used the Bushnell 4x30 Xtra-Wide Binoculars?  Curious how these two compare relative to how sharp the off-axis remains.

 

http://www.bhphotovi...m=Y&A=details=



#25 Sarkikos

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 10:49 AM

Bushnell 4x30 Xtra-Wide Binocular.  I've seen these come up before in this forum.  I thought about going for them but haven't yet.  

 

Specs per product description:

 

- 17.1 degrees TFOV

- 68.4 AFOV (17.1 x 4)

- 6mm exit pupil

- FC optics

- "Focus free."  Doesn't sound good to me.  I think that might be a deal breaker.

 

Here is one review from the B&H website:

 

 

 

You will need very good eyesight (without wearing glasses, and also the same eyesight for two eyes) to use the binoculars.

 

Well, that rules me out.  This is a reason similar to why I sold the Widebino 2.3x42's. Not good for eyeglass wearers.  I guess I'll just have to live with my Canon 10x42 IS binos. :shrug:

 

Mike


Edited by Sarkikos, 10 November 2015 - 11:19 AM.



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