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Anyone with the new Lunt 50mm PT?

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#1 Orion64

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 12:34 PM

Has anyone had a chance to acquire and review the new Lunt 50mm PT?

 

I am seriously considering getting this scope. My reason is basically that the scope is much cheaper than the 60mm. Plus, almost all 60mm lunt telescopes which are double stacked these days use a second 50mm etalon. Of course this then makes the 60mm scope redundant if not used in single stack.

 

So anyone had a chance to test the scope?



#2 bill1234

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 06:08 PM

I tested a double stacked one at NEAF in April an found it stunning.

I don,t think any have been delivered yet. Lunt had a production problem. So the first delivery date of July was postponed .  


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#3 skemobserver

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 10:56 PM

What was the view like in this scope single stack?
The scope is now scheduled for oct, I have one on order.

#4 Orion64

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 03:06 AM

I think that these scopes may be an excellent "replacement" for the 60PT. In single stack the 60PT should be better but when double stacking with a 50mm etalon, there is a huge cost savings. For me it almost does not makes sense to get the 50mm. IMO, if you are going for a small portable scope its either the 50PT or the 80PT. Depends on you available funds of course.

 

Can't wait for the reviews.



#5 bill1234

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 06:24 AM

They wouldn't let me try without the DS filter on..and I did ask several times.



#6 Orion64

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 07:39 AM

Bill, that's strange. I cannot imagine why.



#7 skemobserver

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 10:00 AM

I have heard that before, it is a strange one. Why would they not let someone look through the standard scope? Is it a way too make sure they wow you into buying the extra etalon?

#8 bob71741

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 11:31 AM

"I have heard that before, it is a strange one. Why would they not let someone look through the standard scope?"

 

I've heard that the LS50T used at that show was the engineering prototype and was the only one that they had; and based on that, there can be several reasons (mechanical, optical) why the unit could not be easily be shown in a single stacked mode. In about six weeks, there will be another major astronomy show in Tucson, and I'll bet that Lunt will have several LS50Ts outside pointing at the sun in single and double stack mode; if only double stack is available at that time, then maybe we can seriously question  whether the LS50T is a viable product  for single stack operation. 



#9 bill1234

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 03:22 PM

Just want to add the only thing I didn't like was the helical focuser .This is where the saving comes from.

Also it will replace the LS35 (witch is no longer being made)and be a better choice than a PST. 

If you plan on imaging the LS60 with a normal focuser is a much better choice and probably the biggest bang for the buck . IMO



#10 AlphaGJohn

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 10:06 PM

Bill E.,

 

Can you tell us more about the nature of the helical focuser (clearly not ideal but...)? How awkward/inconvenient was it to use?

 

Did it appear that you could fit it with another focuser if you wanted to lay out the cash? (Or is the blocking filter an integral part of the focuser?) I suppose I could ask the Lunt folks these questions, but they'd be less likely to be able to give a useful report of the character of the helical focuser.

 

I've been wondering about getting a SS LS60 and then maybe adding the DS unit later, but for about the same money as the SS LS60, I could have a DS LS50.... And of course, I have to convince my CFO/wife that this is a useful expenditure... ;-)

 

Thanks for whatever you can tell us, Bill.

 

John



#11 bill1234

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 06:50 AM

The helical focuser is used on the LUNT 35 and on all Coronado scopes except the PST. It is ring around the draw tube that when turned ,brings the draw tube in and out.It has a more limited travel than a conventional focuser.I have seen many Coronado 90s that have been converted to a conventional focuser.I think this has to be done by a shop. I don't think the LS50 can be converted.

Awkword....maybe at first few uses.        Inconvienient....no, just different.

the blocking filter is not intigrated and the one they showed a NEAF was the upgreded b600.



#12 AlphaGJohn

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 12:17 PM

Thanks for the info, Bill.

 

I assume the LS50 also have a drawtube for rough focusing adjustments. Helical focusers' limited range of travel generally requires some kind of coarse adjustment also, right? But, given that you were just looking through it, I don't suppose you had occasion to adjust the focus enough to need more than the helical. I've read comments of people complaining about how awkward it is to use the combination helical/drawtube focusers on some other solar scopes so that's mainly what I'm curious about.

 

Lunt certainly seems to have hit a good price-point with the LS50. It'll be very interesting to see what users of it have to say.

 

John



#13 Orion64

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 01:26 PM

I am reading this thread with great curiosity



#14 bill1234

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 02:51 PM

Well I guess we all have to wait till October for some owner reports. :fingertap:



#15 StarStuff1

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 03:34 AM

I have had the Lunt 35 for nearly 3 years and found the slide/helical focuser not to be a problem. Dunno if it is the same as on the new 50mm models. A good dual speed crayford would be even nicer but would certainly raise the price. BTW, I don't do AP.



#16 crow

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 06:01 PM

Don't assume the Crayford would be good focuser though. The one I got with my Lunt 60t is bad. Just rough and notchy to use.



#17 Telescopic

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 06:47 PM

I think that these scopes may be an excellent "replacement" for the 60PT. In single stack the 60PT should be better but when double stacking with a 50mm etalon, there is a huge cost savings. For me it almost does not makes sense to get the 50mm. IMO, if you are going for a small portable scope its either the 50PT or the 80PT. Depends on you available funds of course.

 

Can't wait for the reviews.

 

This is why I decided to get the 60mm DS unit for my Lunt 60mmPT and it was worth it.  Why spend the money on a 60mm scope only to stop it down to 50mm?  If I didn't already have the 60mm DS Lunt I would be looking at this scope though.



#18 StarStuff1

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 11:31 AM

To crow:

 

I had a stock Lunt 60 last year for a while and the focuser seemed very smooth to me.



#19 skemobserver

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 02:56 AM

Any news on the release on this scope in the states? Think we're looking at November now, here in the uk.

#20 steveward53

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 12:43 PM

I was talking to Alan Traino last week at Greenwich and he told me that they hope to star shipping this week , there will be an obvious wait until stockists have them available.

 

Hats off to the Lunt team for rejecting the first batch as not fit for purpose , and not just sending them out regardless of quality as Daystar did with the Quark ...  :waytogo:



#21 Lee.S

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 12:25 PM

I added my name to the list and will be  new to the H.a version of Solar observing although I use a white filter on my XT8i Dob to look at sunspots and transit/eclipses.

Fae  at Lunt says around four month lead time,so I  probably will start getting excited around March if all goes well on production issues.Gives me time to decide on saddling or purchasing separate go to  mount  I find that most answers to my questions have already been posted from this great forum ,but I might have to tweak my understanding by asking a lot more.

 

Thanks to all on C.N.

L.S.


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#22 bob71741

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 02:03 PM

This past weekend, Lunt was at the Woodland Hills Camera /Pierce College expo/star party. There are several images of a LS50 H-alpha telescope mounted outside for the viewing demo. It is double stacked. 

I have not heard of any reports from anyone viewing thought the LS50 on any of the solar forums; in fact of the six or so images of the telescope no one is viewing though it; then again it is mounted next to a big gun and everyone likes to look through the big ones. 

In about two weeks the ASAE show will be in Tucson; am hoping for sunny skies and an LS50 single and double stacked telescope setup outside  to view from.

 

Images of the Woodland Hills Camera event can be found here:

http://www.stephenra...2014/index.html

 

Images #17, #22, and  #41 show the best view of the LS50.



#23 skyward_eyes

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 10:19 AM

The LS50THa is a high quality instrument. The build quality is just like the LS60 and larger scopes. The view is bright with exceptional detail. Proms are easy and clear to see. Surface detail appears like the skin of an orange. When double stacked the filaments crack across the sun's disk and are easy to see. The back ground is nice and dark, not a lot of red glow. The scope even shows a nice thin line of spicuals which is normally seen in larger scopes. The scope is a winner in my book. I think this will become the new standard for a intro into H-alpha.


Edited by skyward_eyes, 17 October 2014 - 10:25 AM.

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#24 bandazar

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 12:58 PM

Hmmm, searching a bit online it looks lke spicules are .4 to 1.5 arc second widths..  but this is just a claim.  But if that claim were true, that would mean that you would at least need an 80mm roughly to see some of the largest spicules.  and more like 90mm to resolve.  Yes, you can "see" them in smaller apertures, just not in the same level of detail as 90mm or larger scopes.  Or am I missing something?



#25 skyward_eyes

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 10:19 AM

You really need a 90mm plus scope to get into the detail of spicuals. But the thin red band could be seen in the 50 but not much detail as far as individual spicuals.


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