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Drawing or Dimensions for bolt pattern for Celestron HD Pro Wedge on a tripod mount?

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#1 Ralph Semrock

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 07:58 PM

I'm having a steel pier fabricated and I need to have the dimensions for the bolt circle layout for the tapped holes on the Celestron HD Pro Wedge.  Yes, I could attempt to measure that myself, but I'm not a machinist and if I'm off even a little, the wedge won't bolt on the top plate of the pier.

 

I've searchd the web for hours and I cannot find any drawing or dimensions of the three hole layout. I even talked to Celestron and their technicians couldn't access one either.  I guess if I can't find it somehow, I'll just have to take either the wedge itself or the tripod itself over to the fab shop and let them measure it.

 

Thanks,

Ralph



#2 Arctic_Eddie

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 07:16 AM

Measure the center-to-center distance between two of the holes, P. Calculate the bolt circle diameter, D,  from the below equation.

 

D = P / 0.866

 

Taken from this link using method 2.

 

http://www.had2know....e-diameter.html



#3 hdt

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 08:10 AM

I'm having a steel pier fabricated and I need to have the dimensions for the bolt circle layout for the tapped holes on the Celestron HD Pro Wedge.  Yes, I could attempt to measure that myself, but I'm not a machinist and if I'm off even a little, the wedge won't bolt on the top plate of the pier.

 

I've searchd the web for hours and I cannot find any drawing or dimensions of the three hole layout. I even talked to Celestron and their technicians couldn't access one either.  I guess if I can't find it somehow, I'll just have to take either the wedge itself or the tripod itself over to the fab shop and let them measure it.

 

Thanks,

Ralph

Ralph,

 

Let me make a few suggestions in case you haven't already thought of it:

 

Make the flange of the pier removable , in case you choose to change to a different mount later in retirement.  Also think about height placement.

 

Also--consider that your observatory (if I remember your post) is up on the second story. How stable is your pier going to be? Is it attached to your floor joist, or does it go to one of the house vertical posts? Will the pier shake every time you walk on the floor?  



#4 Ralph Semrock

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 02:46 PM

Measure the center-to-center distance between two of the holes, P. Calculate the bolt circle diameter, D,  from the below equation.

 

D = P / 0.866

 

Taken from this link using method 2.

 

http://www.had2know....e-diameter.html

 

Arctic Eddie,

 

Thank you so much!  I should have known that since I taught CAD and drafting for 25 years before I retired, but I drew the diagram from the website and yes, it works just great!  Practical Trig wins again!  My hole-to-hole distance is 4.4375 and the BC is 5.124 (which is probably 5.125)  The precision is based on how accurate you measure the hole-to-hole distance, so I'm comfortable with what I got since the BC's are usually increments of eighths, quarters, etc.

 

I can now finish the drawings for the fabricator, thanks to you!

 

Always the best,

Ralph

 

Anyway, it works. .  I've now got it, and thanks so much to you



#5 Ralph Semrock

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 04:34 PM

 

I'm having a steel pier fabricated and I need to have the dimensions for the bolt circle layout for the tapped holes on the Celestron HD Pro Wedge.  Yes, I could attempt to measure that myself, but I'm not a machinist and if I'm off even a little, the wedge won't bolt on the top plate of the pier.

 

I've searchd the web for hours and I cannot find any drawing or dimensions of the three hole layout. I even talked to Celestron and their technicians couldn't access one either.  I guess if I can't find it somehow, I'll just have to take either the wedge itself or the tripod itself over to the fab shop and let them measure it.

 

Thanks,

Ralph

Ralph,

 

Let me make a few suggestions in case you haven't already thought of it:

 

Make the flange of the pier removable , in case you choose to change to a different mount later in retirement.  Also think about height placement.

 

Also--consider that your observatory (if I remember your post) is up on the second story. How stable is your pier going to be? Is it attached to your floor joist, or does it go to one of the house vertical posts? Will the pier shake every time you walk on the floor?  

 

 

Hello hdt!

 

Yes, I spent a lot of thought in where to locate the observatory.  As the attachment shows, it's a 6 ft Home Dome that rests on a 6 ft x 6 ft wall supported structurally over a concrete divider wall in the garage areas below that separates our Kubota garage from the 2-car garage.  It's 27 ft off the ground and is accessed by the third floor dormer across a deck. The observing floor is isolated 32" higher than the pier mounting floor so I don't walk on the same floor as the mounting.  Structually, the mounting floor is overkill with multiple sheets of plywood (over 2.25" thick) glued and screwed to oversized floor joists spaced only 12" apart.  I want to really limit any vibration.  The floor is supported by heavily beefed up garage roof rafter and joist structural elements that are oversized and braced excessively tied to the concrete wall.  I just wanted to mininmize any vibrations as much as I could.  A single pier over 27 feet long is just too long for a self-standing element.

 

Observatory.jpg

 

I know this is probably heresy to most observers, but I believe it should work.  I'll let you know.  :)

 

Thanks for the comments and suggestions.

 

Always the best,

Ralph



#6 hdt

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 06:07 PM

hope your neighbors are far away, and don't have a backyard light pointing straight at you  ;)

 

It's great that you have no trees to get in your way.  Sounds like you thought this out pretty well; you should be OK vibration-wise.

 

Best of luck! Looks like a beautiful house.




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