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The Classic Moon

beginner classic moon refractor
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#1 AllanDystrup

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 05:00 AM

A break in the cloud cover yesterday, so I seized the opportunity to have a closer look at the south Imbrium bassin called Sinus Aestuum, the "Seething Bay" (or "Bay of Billows", as Rükl poetically call it).

 

This is an interesting area with several "DMD" (Dark Mantle Deposit) pyroclastic areas : plains and hills covered in dark ash from fire fountaining eruptions of nearby vulcanic vents.

 

SinusAestuum-141130.jpg

 

Extended areas with "dark matter" was clearly seen in my classic 80mm Vixen refractor, noticeably N of Scrhröter and E of Bode C.

 

Also a smaller (ca. 20x20km) distinctly dark area south of the E part of the Hyginus Rille. -- Afterwards I checked with Rükl, and he shows a pair of domes / shield vulcanoes in this small area, which I guess would be the source of the ash eruptions. I didn't see (or look for) these in my 80mm, but I plan to do so next time I get the chance (and possibly bring out my 100mm classic refractor too) !

 

Allan


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#2 stevenk

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 05:13 AM

Allan

Very nice indeed. With all the gadgetry around it is exceptionally refreshing to see a record of real observing.

I love your log and your drawing. 

 

Well done

 

Steve


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#3 Sasa

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 07:04 AM

Hello Allan, nice classic observation! I'm not sure if this is the same feature as your darker areas, somewhere around this time, there is a nice S shaped darker hilly region (close to Hyginus Rille), I need to look at the map to know its name and exact location. Concerning the domes, I catch some time ago a dome near Gambart C (left-bottom part of your sketch). It was nicely visible in 110mm refractor and should be still within the reach of your 80mm

 

Moon_GambardC_dome_20130518_1935UT.jpg


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#4 AllanDystrup

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 10:23 AM

Pyroclastics.jpg


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#5 NeilMac

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 10:37 AM

Cool ! :)



#6 kraterkid

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 10:39 AM

Great observation and wonderful sketches of the phase and region, Allan. There are some real surprises in this area, and I often reflect on what a spectacular sight it must have been when these eruptions occurred. I also wonder how many domes and rilles lay buried under the debris flows and ejecta from Imbrium and Copernicus. I was out imaging this area on the 30th as well, but the lighting was a bit more favorable for you (lunation 7.7 days for me) so this image shows less detail in the DMDs. Still it does indicate that the area is replete with volcanic features.   

Attached Thumbnails

  • Web small M00000_g3_ap647 11292014 0418 to 0558 UTC avi 16.jpg

Edited by kraterkid, 01 December 2014 - 10:42 AM.

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#7 Rick Woods

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 10:59 AM

Wonderful work by everyone here!


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#8 Terra Nova

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 11:02 AM

Wonderful observation report Allan. Your formalized observations are an inspiration to us all. I certainly am inspired by them to get out and do more sketching of the Sun, moon, and planets. Sometimes, I think we get too caught up with the equipment and loose sight of the purpose. Thanks for the reminder!


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#9 bremms

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 12:35 PM

Very nice! Turns out we decided to look at the daytime moon through the 12 3/8" Clark at the SC State Museum yesterday. I brought over an 80's military surplus 28mm wide field EP that I donated to the club for outreach. ( Design is like a Nagler Type 4) So for about 20 minutes we looked at the moon at 178x using a 28mm EP! only a few visitors came by that late in the day.



#10 AllanDystrup

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 02:16 PM

Thanks Terra, and all :-) 
Excellent photo of the South Imbrium bassin Rich! -- and yes, a shame we're too late for the  "hot spot" show, must have been a supreme sight of violent vulcanic fire fountains, 3 billion years ago...  Still, fun to explore the area in the telescope and try to find the (almost) "smoking guns".
Allan


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#11 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 07:40 PM

Allan, you inspire me. When I look at the Moon, I see only lots of crags. Never understood the interest. You are a forensic scientist. I could become one, a new direction in life, based on a new appreciation. Thank you! 

 

You ought to frame your drawings and sell them as part of a sure-fire get-rich-quick scheme. They are beautiful!


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#12 star drop

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 08:18 PM

Allan, excellent work indeed!



#13 AllanDystrup

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 02:12 AM

Thanks again friends, for the positive feed back on my recent moon observation !

 

A knowledge of the geological processes that shaped the moon,

really does add an extra dimension to the understanding of the evolution

and current morphology of the landscapes, we can observe up there.

 

Knowing specifically where to look and what to look for, greatly increases

the excitement and fun of lunar observation, -- at least in my experience.

 

Joe, here are some of my inspirational sources, to get you started  :)

 

Moon 101, NASA Johnson Space Center

https://www.youtube....h?v=vVwLr-1XfyA

A series of YouTube videos on lunar topology and geology.

At the same time educational and entertaining !

 

The Modern Moon: A Personal View, Charles A. Wood (Book)

http://www.amazon.co...w/dp/0933346999

The best source I know of for a comprehensive and coherent description and analysis

of the formation and current appearance of lunar landscapes.
Warmly recommended. -- Problem is that it's out of print, and the price is high.

(A have a spare, new copy for $185, -- you should be able to get a used one for le$$)

 

Photographic Moon Book, Alan Chu (PDF)

http://www.alanchuhk.com/

 

Selenology Today (journal, PDF)

http://www.lunar-cap...ologyToday.html

 

Enjoy!

Allan

 

PS: I wanted to know more about the DMDs I had identified in the Sinus Aestuum area, and found this geological map at LPI : http://www.lpi.usra....alog/usgs/I548/

 

SE-DMDs.jpg
 

 


Edited by AllanDystrup, 02 December 2014 - 05:37 AM.

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#14 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 09:30 AM

"Joe, here are some of my inspirational sources, to get you started"

 

Wow! Live from Denmark, tips to get this recovering Moon-basher started! Thanks, Allan; I'll let you know what I find! 

 

I can walk in a forest and, looking at the mix of trees, tell something of its history. Surely the Moon shall become similarly accessible! 


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#15 RussL

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 10:13 AM

Very nice! Turns out we decided to look at the daytime moon through the 12 3/8" Clark at the SC State Museum yesterday. I brought over an 80's military surplus 28mm wide field EP that I donated to the club for outreach. ( Design is like a Nagler Type 4) So for about 20 minutes we looked at the moon at 178x using a 28mm EP! only a few visitors came by that late in the day.

 

 

Hi bremms.  I'm Russell Lowery.  I work at the museum in the exhibits department.  I don't know your user name on here, but we may know each other.  I've done a lot of work in the observatory.  I also made the starfield in the window of the Fitz scope exhibit.  Been at the museum since 1985.



#16 Lew Chilton

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 01:10 AM

Back in the 1950s, Alika Herring's lunar drawings were a regular feature in Sky & Telescope magazine, as were Mars and Saturn drawings by Tom Cave and others. I briefly took up lunar drawing in 1958 after acquiring my first decent telescope, an Edmund Scientific 4.25-inch Palomar Jr.  (I still have those drawings somewhere.)  Seeing the beautiful lunar drawings on this thread, I am inspired by these astro-artists to take it up again, using, of course, my vintage telescopes. Thanks gentlemen for inspiring me!


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#17 AllanDystrup

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 10:23 AM

Here's a sketch from yesterdays full moon in Gemini.

I concentrated on the eastern shore of Mare Serenitatis.

 

MS-1.jpg

 

Here the increasing thickness of the Imbrian lava flows and the associated downdrop of the central bassin have caused the faults in the floor of Posidonius, as well as the submerged western rim and the complete flooding of Le Monnier.

 

The dark areas in and outside the 'fjord' 20km S of Littrow is glassy DM (Dark Mantle) material erupted from nearby fire fountains. 32 years ago the Apollo 17 LM gently set down here. The astronauts sampled rocks in a landslide from the South Massive guarding the entrance to the 'fjord'. The landslide was later dated 109 million years, -- roughly corresponding to the Tycho crater impact. A ray from the Tycho ejecta blanket can be seen crossing Mare Serenitatis, from Menelaus at the S shore through Bessel and further up north.

Allan

 

PS.

For this observation I used my small Zeiss C50/540mm refractor, with a 2.6xGPC and a BCO-18mm for 121x magnification.


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#18 NeilMac

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 11:54 AM

:waytogo:



#19 Astrojensen

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 04:50 AM

Hi Allan

 

Really nice drawings! But....

 

You really should have looked at Mare Smythii and Mare Marginis, as they were exceptionally well librated and under extremely favorable light Saturday night. I had the best view ever of Mare Smythii with my 6" f/8 newtonian. 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark



#20 AllanDystrup

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 11:18 AM

Dang :-)

 

I still consider myself new to (modern) lunar observation, and so many interesting areas to explore up there . . .

 

I'm sure tho' I'll get another shot at M.s Smythii and  Marginis, all in due time :-)

 

Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 08 December 2014 - 11:19 AM.

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#21 Astrojensen

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 02:45 PM

A hint: Whenever possible, always start with a close examination of the libration areas. Often, they're not particularly well librated or under good light, but when they are, you want to catch it at once and make as much of it as possible. 

 

Interesting areas include: Mare Marginis, Mare Smythii, Mare Humboldtianum, Mare Australe, Mare Orientale, Vallis Inghirami, the north and south pole areas (the south in particular).  

 

Mare Crisium also shows a markedly different appearance, depending on the libration. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#22 kraterkid

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 04:53 PM

A great idea Thomas, and for those folks who want to find the Moon's libration I would recommend the VMA (Virtual Moon Atlas) by Christian Legrand and Patrick Chevalley. The program has a red marker that can be selected to display the favorable libration zone. I've found it very useful as an obvious flag to pay attention to those areas when sketching or imaging. You can't miss a big red arrow!  :lol: It is a freeware program but if you use it and find it a valuable resource, be sure to send a donation. 


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#23 AllanDystrup

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 01:34 AM

 the VMA ... has a red marker that can be selected to display the favorable libration zone. 

 

Thanks for that tip, Rich !

I've used the VMA for over a year by now, but wasn't aware of that particular config flag !

Allan



#24 kraterkid

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 11:21 PM

You're very welcome Allan, glad it was helpful.

 

 

I was out imaging early in the morning on December 11, 2014 between 12:26 and 12:45 UTC and as I made sight of Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquillitatis, I thought about your great sketches and commentary on the area, so I took some images of the region and assembled them into a mosaic. I think your sketch compares quite well with this image, you did a terrific job capturing the tonal differences around the periphery of Serenitatis. Those dark albedo features related to the pyroclastic deposits in your drawing are easily discriminated in the mosaic as well. Just a fantastic job on this sketch. Hope you enjoy this one:

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#25 AllanDystrup

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 09:40 AM

WOW, wonderful mosaic picture there Rich, of M. Serenitatis !

 

Always interesting to compare a sketch with a good photography of the same area, --

the pyroclastic deposits were very obvious at "high noon" (full moon),

and the darker lava at edge (esp. the E and S) of M.S. were definitely noticeable

in my small 50mm refractor, though not as sharply delineated as in your picture.

 

I definitely plan to spend more time on the E shore of M.S., --

looking forward for a chance to sketch the Apollo 17 landing area

with my 4" refractor, with the terminator not too far away...

 

Thanks again :-)
Allan




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