Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

The Classic Moon

beginner classic moon refractor
  • Please log in to reply
175 replies to this topic

#26 NeilMac

NeilMac

    Skylab

  • -----
  • Posts: 4,063
  • Joined: 25 Sep 2010
  • Loc: MedHat, AB, Canada

Posted 14 December 2014 - 12:10 PM

Nice grab :waytogo:



#27 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 26 December 2014 - 10:20 AM

December 25. was the first starry night in many weeks, here north of Copenhagen (Denmark).

A change to winds from the west swept away the clouds and brought clear, frosty air,

plus a nice 4 days old crescent moon in the south, sailing west at the night approached.

 

I took out my 80mm Vixen for a closer look at Mare Crisium.

 

MareCrisium-2014-12-25.jpg  

 

Crisium is a 400km wide impact bassin with 2-5km high mountain massifs at the N and S shores,

in combination with a relatively low W and E rim, which can be explained by an oblique impact

of a comet  or asteroid coming in low from the west.

 

The Crisium floor is relatively smooth, covered by a thick layer of old, dark (titanium-rich) basalt,

which has also submerged the craters Yerkes and Lick at the SW border of the Mare.

 

The central part of the floor has then caved in, leaving a ca. 25km wide, shallow bench at the edge;

Younger lava flows have since covered the central part of Crisium, causing a system of wrinkle wridges

at the shallow bench. I could clearly see the NE wrinkle ridge (Dorsum Oppel) that curves

from E of Pierce up towards Cleomedes F.

 

The young craters Picard and Pierce can be seen to have excavated some of the dark basalt

from the deeper and older lava layer.

 

Allan


  • Carol L, Charles B., buddyjesus and 6 others like this

#28 raffaello

raffaello

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 262
  • Joined: 10 Oct 2007

Posted 26 December 2014 - 11:09 AM

great study. I agree with the intersting Sinus Aestuum region as source of pyroclastic deposit. I am recently working on that region for an out study, including Schroter crater.
In some restricted area of Sinus Aestuum II region have been discovered spinel rich rocks, described in literature.
Raf
=================================
online lunar domes atlas (GLR group)
http://lunardomeatlas.blogspot.it/


  • AllanDystrup likes this

#29 Sasa

Sasa

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,545
  • Joined: 03 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Ricany, Czech Republic

Posted 26 December 2014 - 11:12 AM

Wonderful drawing Allan!

#30 Tore E

Tore E

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 299
  • Joined: 27 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Oslo, Norway

Posted 28 December 2014 - 01:35 AM

Wow, impressiv drawing Allan!!!



#31 NeilMac

NeilMac

    Skylab

  • -----
  • Posts: 4,063
  • Joined: 25 Sep 2010
  • Loc: MedHat, AB, Canada

Posted 28 December 2014 - 11:10 AM

Great Drawing ! :)



#32 kraterkid

kraterkid

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,167
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2005
  • Loc: Jacumba, California

Posted 28 December 2014 - 04:51 PM

Allan, I very much enjoy your superb sketch of Mare Crisium, Cleomedes and Taruntius as well as your concise and well written area commentary and description. I find basins to be some of the most intriguing and exciting features on the Moon, as they provide large scale geological engines for much of the near side topography. An interesting aspect of the Crisium basin morphology is that a number of “platform massifs” surround the mare. They appear to have slid toward the basin center after being undermined and floated on mare lavas. This occurred not only due to the mass of basalt that began to fill in the transient crater, but also because the hotter asthenosphere below the brittle crust of the lithosphere also flowed toward this center and as it did, fractured sections of terra broke away from the basin rim margins and drifted towards the mare center, where we observe them now. Another interesting aspect to this basin is the obvious presence of a set of multi-ring concentric scarps separated by basalt flooded moats that surround the mare.

 

I’ve sketched Crisium before so I thought I’d share this one.

 

 

This is a image I acquired with my Alter 815 f/15 3048 mm Maksutov telescope with a Luminera Skynyx 2.0 M video camera on December 12, 2014 at 04:03 to 04:06 UTC, avis captured with Lu Cam Recorder, 1500 frames sorted and stacked in AutoSkakkert 2.0, Wavelets applied in Registax 6.0. Sharpness and contrast adjustments in LightZone. 

 

 

Oh and Merry Crisium!

Attached Thumbnails

  • Web M00001_g3_ap637 121114 1115 UTC 1500 frames 90pc avi 12.jpg

Edited by kraterkid, 30 December 2014 - 01:25 PM.

  • Kutno, buddyjesus, AllanDystrup and 1 other like this

#33 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 29 December 2014 - 06:31 AM

Hi Rich, -- and yes: Hare Crisium :-)

Thank you, and I thoroughly enjoyed your superb sketch and description of the dramatic genesis of Mare Crisium 2-2-07 in your album (which I have now "earmarked" for further reference, what an excellent inspirational source of information on lunar geology!).

 

I found your description of the history of “platform massifs” especially interesting, as I was not aware of this geological process. I think I caught some of the mare massifs North of Yerkes E (also visible on the photo with your Mak), and it seems like some others have "slid out" on the border shelf East of the southern part of Dorsa Tetyaev? Very interesting !

 

A Happy Lunatic New Year!

Allan



#34 Ziggy943

Ziggy943

    In Memoriam

  • *****
  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 3,537
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2006
  • Loc: Utah

Posted 30 December 2014 - 03:40 AM

Allan,

I have a renewed interest in viewing the Moon following what is, for me, a pretty nice photo of a nearly 10 day old Moon on Oct. 3rd. I find the documentation you are posting very interesting but I’m trying to understand your labeling.

 

In the original post the top drawing shows a 9 day old Moon with an arrow to a location labeled Sinus Aestuum. It looks to me though that the drawing is a North up, East to the right, drawing and the arrow is actually pointing to the eastern edge of Mare Nubium.

 

Am I misinterpreting the arrow?

 



#35 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 30 December 2014 - 04:43 AM

Hi Ziggy,

 

Yes, the finder view is drawn using a Zeiss Amici diagonal, so it's North up, East right, as you mention.

 

Comparing now with a picture of the 9 day moon, I can understand your confusion. 

M.Nubium was in the dark (west of the terminator), but what seems to have happened is, that the area I focused on (southern Imbrium) has somehow "swollen" in importance on the drawing, so it fills a disproportionate area...

 

Here's what the finder drawing should have looked like.

 

SA2.jpg

 

Thanks for the correction.
Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 30 December 2014 - 04:53 AM.


#36 Ziggy943

Ziggy943

    In Memoriam

  • *****
  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 3,537
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2006
  • Loc: Utah

Posted 30 December 2014 - 11:44 AM

Thanks for the explanation Allan. I had read the current S&T article about IMPs and trying to identify them on my picture. Your drawings and description were just up that alley. Volcanic activity is what I want to focus on this year. At this year's star parties I want to focus on showing volcanic activity to the public. So I am very interested in identifying them and seeing if I can find them.

 

I can see I'm going to have to get a better Lunar atlas.

 

Thanks again. Great work.


Edited by Ziggy943, 30 December 2014 - 11:52 AM.


#37 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 27 January 2015 - 07:33 AM

Weeks of dreary, damp and overcast weather i N. Europe...
Then, on Jan. 25, the clouds scattered, and I had a clear view of the 6 day old moon !

 

Sunrise on the eastern shore of Mare Serenitatis, one of the areas I had lined up for further study, so that was quite fortunate :-) On the negative side, as the evening turned into night, the temperature dropped, the humidity condensed to freezing fog -- and my R.A. motor went into some annoying backlash spasms.

 

Anyway, I did manage an overall study of Posidonius plus the Mons Argaeus hinterlands, before the situation deteriorated from annoying to intolerable.

 

150125-SerenitatisEast.jpg

The wealth of FFC details in Posidonius is always rewarding,-- the eastern landslide and central peaks were easily seen in the low sun.

 

I continue to find the Mons Argaeus area is fascinating, -- the geological history of the block faulted highlands is intriguing, and on top of that, there's the pyroclastic deposits (DMD) from vulcanic eruptions. In my 80mm Vixen refractor at ~125x magnification, I could easily investigate the Taurus-Littrow valley and the area between the North and South Massives, where the Apollo 17 LEM touched down.

 

Alas, at this point the transparency dropped drastically, so further study must await the next CS with a favourable lunation.

Allan


  • Carol L, Charles B., buddyjesus and 3 others like this

#38 NeilMac

NeilMac

    Skylab

  • -----
  • Posts: 4,063
  • Joined: 25 Sep 2010
  • Loc: MedHat, AB, Canada

Posted 27 January 2015 - 11:16 AM

Great Sketch :waytogo:



#39 Sasa

Sasa

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,545
  • Joined: 03 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Ricany, Czech Republic

Posted 27 January 2015 - 04:35 PM

Great observation and wonderful story, Allan.



#40 kraterkid

kraterkid

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,167
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2005
  • Loc: Jacumba, California

Posted 28 January 2015 - 02:34 PM

Wonder is definitely alive in your heart, Allan. Well done!  :waytogo:



#41 Sasa

Sasa

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,545
  • Joined: 03 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Ricany, Czech Republic

Posted 23 February 2015 - 03:27 AM

Hello Alan,

 

    have a look at page 316 in this wonderful old document

 

www.the1963aristarchusevents.com/JALPO_Vols__18-20.pdf

 

                    Alexander



#42 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 25 February 2015 - 03:39 PM

Yep, sure looks familiar :-))

 

Domes.jpg

 

Thanks for sharing !
Allan
 


 


  • buddyjesus and Sasa like this

#43 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 25 April 2015 - 10:00 AM

A nice spring evening yesterday at our weekend cottage, dusk falling (18:30 UT), carrying a 6 day young moon high in the southern sky and our song thrush in the old oak tree (too early in the season for the nightingale).

 

I had my Zeiss AS63/840 semi-APO out on our small terrace, the evening was mild, the seeing was exceptionally good, the transparency somewhat changing, from drifting cumulus over high cirrus to above medium clear skies.

 

My primary target was the moon, one of my favoutite areas (East Serenitatis) was perfectly illuminated -- but I have spent a lot of time up there recently... So I concentrated on Mare Nectaris instead, -- it was well placed with all four impact rings clearly visible, the Altai Scarp sharply delineated close to the terminator. I hadn't brought my drawing tools or my small astro-cam, so instead I just took a quick snapshot with my moblie phone :

 

2015-04-24%2020.58.46-A.jpg

 

Click on image for full size from the cell phone... (press ESC to return).
Note : this is the raw Picture from the phone camera, *NO* post processing beyond a downscaling to fit the CN size limit...
 

As I said, the seeing was really good, and the optics of the small refractor matched it nicely, with a Baader 1.7x GPC, Zeiss Amici diagonal and a Zeiss 10mm ortho for 143x magnification   :)

 

Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 26 April 2015 - 05:02 AM.

  • gustavo_sanchez, A6Q6 and Tore E like this

#44 NeilMac

NeilMac

    Skylab

  • -----
  • Posts: 4,063
  • Joined: 25 Sep 2010
  • Loc: MedHat, AB, Canada

Posted 25 April 2015 - 10:04 AM

Awesome image Allan :)


  • AllanDystrup likes this

#45 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 13,352
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 26 April 2015 - 04:11 AM

Really fine image! 

 

I myself was at the eyepiece of my 85mm Zeiss apochromat at the very same time. Using 64x, 80x and 128x on the binoviewer, I closely examined the lunar surface in the best seeing so far this year. I had an unusually fine look at the Mare Marginis Swirls, which for the first time for me, where resolved into a large number of white patches. I noticed them already two days before, but then I was only using a 72mm ED, which didn't offer enough light and resolution to resolve them clearly. 

 

I also studied the Arago domes, Rimae Bürg and Rimae Hypatia, as well as admiring the central mountain complex of Theophilus. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


  • AllanDystrup likes this

#46 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 27 April 2015 - 12:48 AM

Here I've  drawn a rough outline of the 4 main Nectaris bassin rings.
(Fragments of) all 4 rings are identifiable on the cell phone snapshot :) 
 

MN.jpg

(Topographic Map of the Moon from USGS, prepared for NASA)

 

Allan


  • j.gardavsky likes this

#47 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 05 May 2015 - 02:40 AM

Here’s a raw image of the Earth Moon:  13 days, 95% illumination ,143x magnification, 0.28dg FOV :

 

Moon_13dy.jpg
(Click for larger view).

 

Date: May 1, 2015, Time: 19:30, Seeing: 3/5, Transparency: 7/10
Telescope was my: Carl Zeiss Jena AS63/840 Telementor (semi-apo refractor), 

Mount : Carl Zeiss Jena Parallactic TM on 2V tripod
Accessories : focal extender: Baader 1.7x GPC, Focal length: 1430, Eyepiece: CZJ 10-O orthoscopic
Camera was my: Apple iPhone 4 1/3.2" BSI CMOS (8MP, 1.4um ), hand held at the eyepiece
(1 frame, no stacking or postprocessing -- Surely not the best focus nor resolution -- but still useful :) )

 

The raw image from the iPhone-4 camera shows (among other objects) the Rainer Gamma swirl (local magcon) and the flooded craters in S. Procellarum (Flamsted P, Wichmann R, Letronne); -- What caught my eye though, was the distinctively  darker, reddish hue of  the 2km elevated Aristarchus plateau, which has been linked to the volcanic origin of the Schröter Valley / Cobra head formation (vulcanic ash with iron/sulfur deposits). :

 

VallisSchröteri.jpg

 

This prompted me to try slightly adjusting the saturation of the iPhone color image, and here’s what I got :

 

Procellarum-3.jpg

(The maps on the right are from USGS, The geologic history of the moon, Wilhelms)

 

The lunar maria show a mostly uniform, greyish color to the naked eye, the noticeable exception being the dark grey areas known as DMDs (Dark Mantle Deposits: pyroclastic crystalline/glass soils), which are clearly seen in even the raw/unprocessed the photo.

 

In the color saturation “enhanced” version, the north Imbrium and Procellarum  show a faint bluish hue, while the Nubium and surrounding areas show a warmer, more red hue. My guess is, that this difference in albedo is reflective (so to speak) of the north Imbrium/Procellarum bassalts having a higher TiO2 – Fe content than the Nubium ditto.

 

Allan


  • A6Q6 likes this

#48 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,713
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 25 May 2015 - 05:38 AM

The Janssen Glider Gun...

 

 

Yesterday, while observing the 7dy moon with my Classic Zeiss Jena AS63/840, I began wondering about the origin of the Janssen crater chain, which was very prominent, -- almost like a glider gun, for those of you who remember Conways "Game of Life"...

 

msg-212744-0-73019700-1433014058.jpg

 

 

 

Pardon the fuzzy image -- I shot it through through a 16mm orthoscopic EP, handheld with my cell phn. at 89x magnification; -- The map is from Antonin Rükl, Atlas of the Moon, 2004, p.163
 

Look at the chain...I mean, yes, it could be a random alignment of morphologically similar craters, but it's so strikingly linear, that one would suspect a common origin, maybe somewhat like the comet Shoemaker-Levy collision with Jupiter in 1994..., or ?

 

There are other crater chains in the neighbourhood, noticeably the Vallis Rheita, but they are thought to be created by Mare Nectaris ejecta, and the orientation of the Janssen crater chain does not line up with these.

 

Any thoughts on this lunar feature ?

 

Allan


Edited by star drop, 30 May 2015 - 02:53 PM.

  • Sasa likes this

#49 Sasa

Sasa

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,545
  • Joined: 03 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Ricany, Czech Republic

Posted 25 May 2015 - 05:58 AM

Great observation, Allan. Lines of craterlets is one of the features I'm trying to look at when observing the Moon.


  • AllanDystrup likes this

#50 Timaoes

Timaoes

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 66
  • Joined: 08 Dec 2008
  • Loc: Sweden

Posted 28 May 2015 - 09:08 AM

As a rather newborn lunatic your reports, and especially your sketches, are really inspiring. I have been sketching DSO:s for years, but the lunar features are a very different challenge, and I'm presently trying to develop my own techniques. Thanks, and keep them coming.

 

Clear skies!

 

Johan (Sweden)


  • AllanDystrup likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: beginner, classic, moon, refractor



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics