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What did you do to your Scope/Mount Today?

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#3801 Marc-Andre

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Posted 17 September 2018 - 09:11 PM

Dolly Update:  I received Jack Handles I'd ordered and filed the top of the leveling screws to accept them and made  ground pads for the fixed point and leveling screws.  Today I added thick furniture felt, mounted the pier and mount and placed the tube on it's mount.  Everything rolls smoothly.  Well, it did cloud over with rain forecast for tonight and tomorrow.

 

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#3802 Augustus

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 03:29 PM

Finally got the 10" Starfinder to balance. Put a Moonlite focuser on it as well.


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#3803 KentTolley

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 01:10 PM

Repainted pier and legs of Cave 8" (a 3rd time) and happy with the results.

 

I added a weight to counter the focusser, ep and finder.  I bought the counterweight from someone here and just had it laying around waiting for installation.  I needed to counter-balance 299 inch-oz, and this weight and bracket gave me 300 inch-oz.  And now the scope goes smoothly where I put it and stays there. 

But I see why Tom Cave further modified the Dec housing by boring it out for the installation of needle bearings.  The old Dec housing, sans bearings  and seen in photo, is harder to turn in the East than it is in the West.  It's easy to see there would be some eccentricity of the housing bearing surface when the housing is clutched down on one side with that big knob.  But at the ep this is not much of an issue.

 

Will add photos later.  Picresize is down.

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Edited by KentTolley, 07 October 2018 - 04:21 PM.

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#3804 KentTolley

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 03:55 PM

This 63 Cave is a real beauty.  Solid yet managable, it is the Goldilocks, just the right size between my little 6" f8 and my big 10" f7.  And it's built like a Leica so that even after 55 years in various stages of use and misuse it is completely restorable.  This little gem only needed a painted pier and legs and a few other details and she shines up good as new.  Thanks again Tim. Here is close-up of splatter paint.

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Edited by KentTolley, 07 October 2018 - 09:54 PM.

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#3805 KentTolley

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 04:00 PM

I'll paint the weight brackets like the pier.

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#3806 KentTolley

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 04:34 PM

You can see why there is some eccentricity when the knob is clamped down.

The Telescopics mount works this way on both axes.

 

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Edited by KentTolley, 07 October 2018 - 04:58 PM.

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#3807 CharlieB

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 09:59 AM

I finally got around to restoring the interior of the case for my Lafayette Galactic.  It was missing the interior tray that houses the 40m finder/guide scope and other accessories as well as the cover for the missing tray.  Thanks to a couple of CN'ers from a while back, I had some good photos to base my construction on.  I didn't follow the original layout exactly, as I was using some wood parts from other old cases, but it's close enough for me.

 

This is the bottom layer with the CW and CW rod, dew shield, mount, eyepiece tray, solar projection screen and its holder.  I pretty much just cleaned it up and replaced felt.

 

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#3808 CharlieB

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 10:01 AM

This is the replacement tray I made from scrap wood from older, trashed cases.  No dovetails - just butt joints.  Now the 40mm scope has a safe place to rest.

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#3809 CharlieB

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 10:02 AM

With the cover.

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#3810 CharlieB

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 10:06 AM

The finder mount rings are not designed to be removed from the OTA.  They fit with the rings facing downward in the case and there is a notch in the case build for it to fit into.  Works like a charm.

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#3811 CharlieB

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 10:08 AM

In cleaning out the case, I found this hiding in a spot I've never looked into.  It's just a bit more documentation to estimate the real age of the scope.

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#3812 CharlieB

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 10:10 AM

The whole shebang.  Everything fits well and in its proper place.

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#3813 Garyth64

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 10:13 AM

Very nice work, it looks great!



#3814 CharlieB

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 10:26 AM

Thanks.  It's not difficult woodworking, but like most projects, the real difficulty is in getting the project in motion.  The Galactic is a superior scope and now I can cart it around without too much worry.


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#3815 Juha

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 11:44 AM

Clean and rebuild, after 20 years not in use :)



#3816 Kasmos

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 02:28 AM

I'm way behind on detailing/restoring several purchases so I find myself hopping back and forth doing a bit here and there on them.

 

The other night while shuffling some boxes I ended up doing several hours of unplanned work on one of my Bushnell Sky Chiefs.

 

These early Sky Chiefs take much longer to clean up than what would be expected because of a particular problem unique to them. Their boxes originally had some kind of foam rubber padding in a few spots that disintegrates into fine particles and basically glues itself to everything it comes in contact with. I've yet to find one good cleaner or solvent that will safely get it off the various different materials/finishes of the scope. Prior to this session, the objective of the scope in the box (photo below), was bathed in a solution of 1 part distilled water to 1 part Windex for an hour or so to successfully softened it up. Curiously Windex wouldn't work on the painted parts. I'm guessing the foam debris chemically bonds to the paint. For the painted stuff I tried mineral spirits, alcohol, Windex, Simple Green, Awesome, followed by polishing compound followed by Turtle Wax. The mineral spirits was the best of the cleaners, but it took polishing compound and wax too get most of it off. 

 

Warning: Be especially careful when using alcohol as a cleaner as it sometimes will dull or take off certain kinds of paint. I remember reading how another member used it on a focuser's badge and it ruined it.

 

Sky-Chief-79.jpg

I wondered what would be lurking under the finder's base? Now I'm wondering what number will be on the other scope.

BTW, you can't see it here, but there's still some sand packed up in the base left from the original sand casting. I noticed the same thing with my old Tasco.

 

2 Sky-Chiefs.jpg

At this point, the foreground tube, finder and mount, is all cleaned up. The scope in the background has been cleaned some but still needs better detailing.

 

Sky-Chief-hardware.jpg

It took over an hour of soaking in mineral spirits, then scrubbing with lacquer thinner and acetone, to get the hardware clean.

 

There's a lot to do and cover on these two scopes so I may start a dedicated thread.


Edited by Kasmos, 13 October 2018 - 02:34 AM.

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#3817 Steve Allison

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 01:04 PM

Don't quote me, do it outside, use rubber gloves and hold your breath...

 

Gasoline often does the trick and does not seem to bother old paint unless you rub too hard.

 

One of my daughter's cars was sideswiped by another car, which left paint from the other car smeared all over the side of hers. It looked horrible and dollar signs floated before my eyes...

 

Being a cheapskate and being that the car was not mine (just kidding, Stephanie!), I tried a rag soaked with gasoline and the errant paint just dissolved away. Her car looked as if nothing had ever happened!

 

I have used gasoline on my Porsche (ulp!) to remove road tar and paint marks left by the car doors of careless K-Mart shoppers. I have never had a problem...

 

I would test a small, inconspicuous area first, though...

 

Barn Burner Steve


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#3818 Kasmos

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 05:55 PM

Don't quote me, do it outside, use rubber gloves and hold your breath...

 

Gasoline often does the trick and does not seem to bother old paint unless you rub too hard.

 

One of my daughter's cars was sideswiped by another car, which left paint from the other car smeared all over the side of hers. It looked horrible and dollar signs floated before my eyes...

 

Being a cheapskate and being that the car was not mine (just kidding, Stephanie!), I tried a rag soaked with gasoline and the errant paint just dissolved away. Her car looked as if nothing had ever happened!

 

I have used gasoline on my Porsche (ulp!) to remove road tar and paint marks left by the car doors of careless K-Mart shoppers. I have never had a problem...

 

I would test a small, inconspicuous area first, though...

 

Barn Burner Steve

I agree. Gas would probably have worked better than anything I used. I was going to try it and completely forgot. foreheadslap.gif  I even had a small jar of it on my work bench left over from degreasing some motorcycle parts that I was going to use. It probably would have saved me hours.

 

It does worry me a bit that Barn Burner Steve, suggests gas.

 

Edit: Oops, by posting this, I just quoted you.


Edited by Kasmos, 13 October 2018 - 06:00 PM.


#3819 clamchip

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 08:31 PM

If you want a little milder gasoline and a much milder smell try Coleman stove fuel.

It's white gas, and I just used some to remove the sticky mess left behind from stick-on

reflectors on my bicycle. It didn't touch the paint, I was very careful of that because the

bike has a beautiful metallic maroon (1983) paint.

I tried Naphtha first and it wouldn't touch it, paint thinner next a no-go, so I kicked it up

a notch and went for white gas, worked great.

 

Robert  


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#3820 Kasmos

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 01:42 AM

Another great tip, but hopefully I'll never again need something as strong as gasoline for cleaning a telescope! 

 

And I thought working on telescopes would be a much cleaner and less toxic hobby than greasy old motorcycles. shrug.gif


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#3821 Steve Allison

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 02:37 AM

Probably already mentioned somewhere is this thread is the use of kerosene to remove old adhesive tape residue. I use valve oil from my trumpet kit, which is kerosene based, and it works great! Lighter fluid is also great for adhesive tape and dried grease removal.

 

But the careful use of gasoline has saved me hours on a number of occasions.

 

Steve



#3822 shredder1656

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 05:50 AM

GASOLINE!!!  My dad told me how he, his brothers, and his buddies decided gasoline, back in the 50s or early 60s, would "cure" their Poison Ivy.  So, they scraped it open, and poured gas all over their arms.  

 

It didn't hurt anything...EXCEPT their rear-ends when Grandpa whooped 'em for trying to get lead poisoning.  LOL.

 

So, it didn't hurt the paint on anything, but it sure warped the back pockets on their pants.  lol.gif 


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#3823 roscoe

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 06:37 AM

Coleman fuel is a great idea!

 

Being a country boy, gas is a regular solvent for cleaning stuff around here, and sometimes I even wear gloves..... it's definitely outdoors, because of the smell if nothing else, but it's 1/3 the price per gallon as any other sensible solvent.

 

I do often follow up with a rinse of mineral spirits to get the lingering smell and whatevers in the gas off the parts if it's going to be an indoors item, and sometimes lacquer thinner or acetone, but they tend to be hard on vintage paint jobs.

 

I have a big old restaurant serving pan about 16 x 24 x 2" deep that is my regular washing station...keeps most of the splatter under control, and is handy to pour into a can to let the ickies settle out.


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#3824 Geo31

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 07:32 AM

This stuff is an incredible parts cleaner:

 

facing-0996-449x750.png

 

https://www.berryman...-parts-cleaner/

 

I rebuilt an engine 20 years ago (OMG, I cannot believe it's been that long) and used this to clean everything.  I'd bought a parts washer, but this worked better than anything.  Just beware.  It WILL strip any paint on whatever you put in there.

 

I like trays.  I have an old set of heavy cookie sheets that I use when using any other solvents to clean products (usually Berryman's C12 Chemtool carburetor cleaner).  It's nice because unless you're filling the tray with solvent, it just evaporates and clean-up is easy.


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#3825 Michael Covington

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 10:25 AM

Does the can by any chance include a wire basket or something for getting parts in and out?  Or how do you approach that?  I like the idea of being able to close it up so there's no evaporation during the cleaning.




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