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What did you do to your Scope/Mount Today?

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#5601 ccwemyss

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Posted 31 August 2020 - 09:34 PM

Hey Robert (clamchip):

 

I've been thinking about your former configuration of the C-14 on a Harbor Freight lift table, and was wondering.  

 

 

Which lift table did you use?  They have a 500 pound and a 1000 pound that's about a hundred bucks more and a little wider.  I've been thinking about getting one of these for Cosmic Acres, so I can use it (with perhaps an appropriately designed cradle on top) to install and remove heavy OTAs from my EM-500 mount.  The saddle is currently about 5 feet off the floor, so quite scary to lift heavy scope up there and try to tighten the dovetail saddle with one hand while holding the scope with the other.  This weekend, I put my 12.5" f/23 Cassegrain (5' long teak plywood tube) on the saddle by first taking the primary cell out of the tube first, then reassembling after the tube was secured on the mount.  A better way would be to stand the tube on end, on a cradle on top of one of these lift tables, then raising it enough to engage the saddle (without the counterweights on the mount), then adding the weights and freeing up the lift table.  Because of its size and height (based on the specs online), I bet the table could be used as a...  ...table for things like eyepieces and laptops.  Even better than an actual table or desk because it's on wheels, so can be moved around the scope when switching targets from one side of the meridian to the other.

 

-Tim.

In my observatory, I use a wire-rack chef's cart from Lowes that has a butcher-block top. I put the C14 on it (with a couple of pieces of 4x4 for a little extra height), face down. It's wheeled, so I can easily push it around until the dovetail aligns with the saddle. once clamped in place, add counterweights to balance, and the C14 lifts right off. When it's not in use, the rack goes into one of the alcoves and holds an eyepiece case, lens covers, and some odds and ends. It's light but very strong. 

 

Chip W. 


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#5602 Mbinoc

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 03:59 PM

I made this simple adapter sleeve so I can experiment with some microscope eyepieces in a vintage .965" scope.

 

1.JPG

 

It was super easy to make, and this is how it was done. I picked up a broken microscope with stripped gears really cheap at goodwill (Under 3$). It came with 5 eyepieces, and a few miscellaneous parts I could use on other projects.

 

The adapter was made from the top portion of the microscope seen in this next photo.

 

2.JPG

 

I just removed it, and shortened it about a 1/4" with a pipe cutter. I then shimmed the exterior diameter of the tube with a few wraps of aluminum flashing tape, and drilled a few holes so the screws in my various diagonals will lock the microscope eyepieces in place when used.

 

3.JPG

 

The adapter works good, and I think the end result looks pretty decent as well.


Edited by Mbinoc, 03 September 2020 - 04:01 PM.

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#5603 Bomber Bob

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Posted 04 September 2020 - 12:18 PM

Meade StarFinder + Losmandy CP-100 Tripod:

 

Meade SF #1 on Losmandy CP-100 Tripod S03.jpg Meade SF #1 on Losmandy CP-100 Tripod S04.jpg

 

My 2 Meade StarFinder EQs are my most versatile Big Mounts.  With practice, I'll be able to assemble the CP-100, pop on the SF EQ, and add counterweights in 10 minutes or less.  My APM 152ED, Tinsley 6" Cass, and my Dakin 4 can go mobile, and I'll still have that stable platform + tracking with no wires, no extension cords, no fuss.

 

Even before CV-19, most of my observing is in the back yard, and I was already moving away from tripods -- pedestals take up less space, I can move around them without smacking something, and such.  BUT, with Jupiter & Saturn so far south & low, I have to set up at the north edge of the yard.  With pedestals, that means using the concrete pool deck -- don't want any tip-overs!  With a tripod, I can set up on the lawn about a dozen feet further north, which puts these low-hanging planets higher above the tree tops sooner & longer -- more observing time.

 

The extra height of the CP-100 means I'll be able to observe these planets straight-through -- no diagonals.  Thanks to Majestic, the Tinsley's coatings are very bright, and the colors are more vivid without a diagonal in the light path.  Ditto for my APM 152ED.  With either scope, just 2 pieces of glass, an eyepiece, and my eyeball.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 05 September 2020 - 07:26 AM.

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#5604 Mbinoc

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Posted 04 September 2020 - 06:50 PM

Last night I went through my spare parts, and pimped out this "Circle T" Towa made Meade Model 226.

 

It was mostly all metal construction to begin with, but with some spare parts I was able to replace any remaining plastic parts with metal parts.

 

1.JPG

 

2.JPG

 

3.JPG

 

It was just a fun little project in trying to optimize a cheap vintage department store scope.

 

The only plastic parts left is the dew shield, and eye piece on the finder.

 

The metal focus knobs were borrowed from a Damaged Tasco Microscope I picked up earlier this week, and were a direct swap out fit.

 

I added lots of washers / shims / and some rubber bushings in strategic places.


Edited by Mbinoc, 04 September 2020 - 06:58 PM.

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#5605 Mbinoc

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Posted 04 September 2020 - 07:13 PM

Harbor freight sells this rubber grommet kit.

 

4.JPG

 

 

I added these bushings to the mounts vertical axis bolts, they made a big difference in the smoothness of operation. Before these bushings were added the adjustment bolts would loosen every time verticle moment was made. Now with the added cushion the scope is more user friendly, and maintains preset friction in movement much better.

 

5.JPG

 

I also added a few of these rubber bushings on the adjustment bar to limit vertical movement and prevent the scope from bottoming out on the cheap mount it came with.


Edited by Mbinoc, 04 September 2020 - 07:33 PM.

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#5606 Marc-Andre

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Posted 06 September 2020 - 07:45 PM

I received the replacement spring for my sander's paper clamp. It took about 15 minutes and 4 clamps to install it under tension.

 

IMG_20200904_113541.jpg

 

The legs for my tri-pier have now received two coats of polyurethane.  They are shown next to the prototype. One error resulted in a design change.  I only planned to route the outside edges of the upper parts of the legs and not the inside where it connects to the pier trunnion, but both sides are done with no effect on fit or function.

 

IMG_20200906_184439.jpg

 

I finished assembly of the leg spreaders.  I still need to drill holes for the leveler screws, once the 1-5/16 Forstner bit arrives, and holes for the trailer hitch attachment.  Here, the 2nd error resulting in a design change. On the one to the left, I glued in the 1' thick layer forgetting cut it to accept the hitch, thus a 2nd 1" thick piece tops the assembly.  It raises the hitch but should not affect its function.  The prototype is included on the right.

 

IMG_20200906_184904.jpg


Edited by Marc-Andre, 06 September 2020 - 07:47 PM.

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#5607 Marc-Andre

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 10:03 AM

Rework.  I didn't like the compromise aesthetics and had to correct the error.  It holds the hitch as planned.

 

Before;

 

IMG_20200906_184904 - Copy.jpg

 

After;

 

IMG_20200907_104558.jpg

 

Plan;

 

IMG_20200907_104717.jpg


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#5608 Marc-Andre

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 11:35 AM

grin.gif   Testing the fit.  

 

IMG_20200907_121656.jpg

 

IMG_20200907_121703.jpg

 

 


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#5609 Pete W

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 12:33 PM

Last night I had the Sears 6339a riding its native EQ head attached to ash legs that came with an old Giro alt-az mount. This setup was more jiggly than I'd hoped, even with a round tray clamped to the legs and using Celestron anti-vib pads on barren ground.  As a comparison, last week I had the Tasco in the grassy backyard riding its native EQ, legs and homemade spreader tray.  This set up was acceptable stability-wise.    So, today I did a side-by-side comparison on the daytime moon only about 15 degrees up. Both setups used the anti-vib pad in the thick grass.

 

IMG_0238.jpg

 

The results:

  • The 6339a was less jiggly than last night (Likely due to the low position of the moon or the grass?) but still unacceptable when the legs were almost fully extended. When I reduced them by about 3 inches as shown in the pic the stability did noticeably improve.  
  • The Tasco setup was still better and was slightly taller than the Sears setup.
  • The Sears EQ is noticeably smoother RA-wise than the Tasco.

I could place the homemade tray spreader on the ash legs, but it's a bit fiddly to do so and it's already too hot today.  It was easier to put the Sears EQ head on the Tasco tripod setup.   It looks like it'll be clear tonight for a backyard test. 

 

 


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#5610 Garyth64

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 01:34 PM

I don't think that the vibration pads should be used on grass.


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#5611 Pete W

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 02:05 PM

I don't think that the vibration pads should be used on grass.

 

I’ve found that they do improve things if you smoosh them into the grass down to the soil.  They have to be seated firmly on the soil or they start tilting.  I use them with the RV 6 pier legs in the grass too.   


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#5612 arachman

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 03:52 PM

Hello All,

 

I love telescopes. If the truth were to be known, I probably like working on them more than looking through them. But I do look through them.

My observing is usually limited to rolling (or carrying) the one I have been working on out of my garage and observing for maybe an hour (sometimes less) and rolling it back in. Moon, planets and a few DSO's. Short and sweet. Every time I see a friend’s astrophotography I start thinking dangerous thoughts about experimenting with a camera but so far I have been able to resist.

Early this year an 8" Cave fell into my lap and it has become my go to scope. It is on the light weight mount with 1" shafts and suffers from two problems. It is not steady enough and it doesn't always want to point where I want to point it.

I have several Dobsonian mounted scopes and they seem more suitable for my usual type of observing. This has led me to a solution. I thought of a way to convert my old design large GEM to work like a Dobsonian (or maybe an Alt/Az). Smaller newer design equatorial mounts can be adjusted to do this simply by rotating the right ascension axis to be vertical but, these older mounts, made for larger reflectors, cannot do this. My solution was to make a simple bushing to go into the top of the pier in place of the pivot fitting that is normally there. Then, if you remove the drive motor from the right ascension axis, it can be inserted, vertically, into the center of this bushing and there it is. Not only does it now work like a Dob but, you have removed the largest contributing factor to shaking. Photos are attached.

I did this first with an 8” Meade 826 and that success encouraged me to try it on the Cave.
The Meade operated very well after conversion with just the right amount of resistance in the right ascension axis. But, not so the Cave. The Cave rotates so freely that I can give it a spin and it makes 3 rotations before stopping. It’s rock steady and is actually usable but, if you sneeze it moves off target. I’m thinking I can add resistance by putting a set screw in the side of the bushing so as to not alter anything on the actual scope. This conversion has not permanently altered the mount in any way. It can easily be put back into it original form.

 

Let me know what you guys think.

Attached Thumbnails

  • GEM_DOB 3.jpg
  • GEM_DOB 2.jpg
  • GEM_DOB 4.jpg

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#5613 tim53

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 12:35 PM

Oh gawd.

 

It is YOUR scope so you can do what you want with it.  Personally, I don't do dobsonians for anything under about 16", didn't like the man the handful of times I met him, and have to wonder if Tom Cave is turning over in his grave.

 

I had one of these some years ago.  I found it worked VERY well when balanced carefully and the rotating rings were tensioned just right.  I'm mostly a planetary imager, and I was surprised to find I could easily recenter a planet just by pushing gently on the tube.  I never used a drive corrector with it.  It also had the best optics of the four 8" Newtonians I had at the time.  I think an 8" Cave on the 1 1/2" shaft mount is just about the perfect size for planetary viewing and imaging.  But the 1" shaft mount works well when adjusted well.  Easy to roll in and out of the garage, fully assembled.

 

-Tim.


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#5614 Augustus

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 12:49 PM

Hello All,

 

I love telescopes. If the truth were to be known, I probably like working on them more than looking through them. But I do look through them.

My observing is usually limited to rolling (or carrying) the one I have been working on out of my garage and observing for maybe an hour (sometimes less) and rolling it back in. Moon, planets and a few DSO's. Short and sweet. Every time I see a friend’s astrophotography I start thinking dangerous thoughts about experimenting with a camera but so far I have been able to resist.

Early this year an 8" Cave fell into my lap and it has become my go to scope. It is on the light weight mount with 1" shafts and suffers from two problems. It is not steady enough and it doesn't always want to point where I want to point it.

I have several Dobsonian mounted scopes and they seem more suitable for my usual type of observing. This has led me to a solution. I thought of a way to convert my old design large GEM to work like a Dobsonian (or maybe an Alt/Az). Smaller newer design equatorial mounts can be adjusted to do this simply by rotating the right ascension axis to be vertical but, these older mounts, made for larger reflectors, cannot do this. My solution was to make a simple bushing to go into the top of the pier in place of the pivot fitting that is normally there. Then, if you remove the drive motor from the right ascension axis, it can be inserted, vertically, into the center of this bushing and there it is. Not only does it now work like a Dob but, you have removed the largest contributing factor to shaking. Photos are attached.

I did this first with an 8” Meade 826 and that success encouraged me to try it on the Cave.
The Meade operated very well after conversion with just the right amount of resistance in the right ascension axis. But, not so the Cave. The Cave rotates so freely that I can give it a spin and it makes 3 rotations before stopping. It’s rock steady and is actually usable but, if you sneeze it moves off target. I’m thinking I can add resistance by putting a set screw in the side of the bushing so as to not alter anything on the actual scope. This conversion has not permanently altered the mount in any way. It can easily be put back into it original form.

 

Let me know what you guys think.

Personally I don't see the point in a mount like that. Either go Dob or keep it as a GEM. 



#5615 arachman

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 10:27 AM

Yes, I knew there would be some purists who would view this a blasphemy but, I see it as a better alternative than to attach bearings and put the Cave tube on a dobsonian mount. 

 

That said, I respect your views. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion.

 

Thanks for your input.


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#5616 vjstangelo

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 03:06 PM

Meade StarFinder + Losmandy CP-100 Tripod:

 

attachicon.gifMeade SF #1 on Losmandy CP-100 Tripod S03.jpgattachicon.gifMeade SF #1 on Losmandy CP-100 Tripod S04.jpg

 

My 2 Meade StarFinder EQs are my most versatile Big Mounts.  With practice, I'll be able to assemble the CP-100, pop on the SF EQ, and add counterweights in 10 minutes or less.  My APM 152ED, Tinsley 6" Cass, and my Dakin 4 can go mobile, and I'll still have that stable platform + tracking with no wires, no extension cords, no fuss.

 

Even before CV-19, most of my observing is in the back yard, and I was already moving away from tripods -- pedestals take up less space, I can move around them without smacking something, and such.  BUT, with Jupiter & Saturn so far south & low, I have to set up at the north edge of the yard.  With pedestals, that means using the concrete pool deck -- don't want any tip-overs!  With a tripod, I can set up on the lawn about a dozen feet further north, which puts these low-hanging planets higher above the tree tops sooner & longer -- more observing time.

 

The extra height of the CP-100 means I'll be able to observe these planets straight-through -- no diagonals.  Thanks to Majestic, the Tinsley's coatings are very bright, and the colors are more vivid without a diagonal in the light path.  Ditto for my APM 152ED.  With either scope, just 2 pieces of glass, an eyepiece, and my eyeball.

What diameter are the shafts? They look like 1" but maybe they are 1.5"?



#5617 Bomber Bob

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 03:15 PM

What diameter are the shafts? They look like 1" but maybe they are 1.5"?

1" steel shafts



#5618 Terra Nova

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 12:29 PM

Those #826 mounts are nice. Quite capable. I donated one to the Cincinnati Observatory last year for the outreach program.


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#5619 Bomber Bob

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 12:58 PM

Let me know what you guys think.

 

I think it's cool, though I wouldn't use it for a LONG reflector.  Our grandkids use the Vixen Polaris that I gave them in AZ mode -- a neat feature of those old mounts -- it carries my intentionally heavy Jaegers 4" F5 RFT.  They use it with 2" stuff at low powers, and it seems natural to them as an alt/az platform...

 

I assume your adapter / bushing is hollow?  How far down does the polar shaft extend?  I also assume there are 3 holes already in the original pedestal...  If so, I'd drill a hole through the bushing at an existing hole, and use one of the long 1/4-20 screws with handles (like I use on my heavy counterweights) as the "clutch" that presses against the polar axis shaft (I'd put a steel collar on that shaft so the screw doesn't scratch / gouge the shaft itself).  Then, you could control the resistance / shaft rotation.  I'd probably add other parts to this clutch assembly to make it smoother -- and prevent metal-on-metal clutching.

 

Something like this:

 

0 - CN Cave EQ - AZ Adapter.jpg


Edited by Bomber Bob, 10 September 2020 - 01:08 PM.


#5620 arachman

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 12:10 PM

I guess it's true, brilliant minds do run parallel! Ha-Ha.  I did almost exactly what you suggested except I decided that the 3 existing holes for the set screws were too small to suit my purpose. I felt I had no choice but to drill a new hole in the pier. 

 

The "GEM-DOB Converter" is a solid bushing 3" long and just under 6" in diameter with a 1.005" hole thru the center and a flange to sit on top of the pier. I drilled a 5/16" hole thru the side of the bushing and then threaded the first 1.5" of this hole at the OD to a 3/8"-16.  Lowe's had an appropriate knob with a threaded shaft about 1.5" long so I inserted a 3" wooden dowel into the hole and tightened it against the shaft with the knob. I really wanted a brass rod but couldn't find one immediately and settled for the dowel.  I'm pretty sure it will wear quickly so I'll start casting around for a brass rod and swap it when I get it. The fit between the shaft and the center hole of the bushing is perfect. The shaft shows no play at all. 

 

Before I drilled the hole in the pier I used a short set screw in the threaded section to apply pressure against the dowel. The set screw was recessed into the bushing when installed. Doing this I had to put the bushing on the shaft, adjust the friction where I thought it should be and then install the assembly on top of the pier. After mounting the tube back on to the mount and finding that I needed more friction I had to disassemble the whole thing to tighten the set screw. I don't like handling the telescope tube any more than I absolutely have to.That made it evident that this set up was not practical and I needed to be able to adjust the friction without taking anything apart. So, the hole and knob. Works good, looks OK so I don't regret it.

Attached Thumbnails

  • GEM_DOB 5.jpg

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#5621 ccwemyss

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Posted 16 September 2020 - 09:18 PM

Cleaned the mirrors and finder optics on the RV-6 that was donated last year. Repaired a break in the outer ring of the primary cell with JB weld. Replaced the two rusted steel and one plastic 10-32 collimation nuts with stainless. Cleaned the grime off of the outside of the tube and the mount. Cleaned the dust and spiderwebs out of the inside. Finished polishing the brass draw tube, and did a clean-up polish of the setting circles. Freed the RA circle so it turns again. Re-installed the primary. Collimated the secondary and primary. 

 

Came out better than I expected, given how bad it looked when it arrived. 

 

Will test it tomorrow. But I think it's ready to go out on loan next week. 

 

I've been trying to collimate the other RV-6, and it did not go nearly as easily - the secondary spider seems to have been twisted. 

 

Chip W. 


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#5622 SamTheMan

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 05:27 PM

SamTheMan again with an update about my Sears Model 3 (like Towa 80mm F15) focuser challenges.  This is my latest and hopefully last post about this.  I think I finally have a working system.

 

I made a focus adapter using a 3" PVC coupling I bought at the local hardware store.  I mated an Orion 80mm (86.4mm ID) focuser to the Sears 84mm OD tube using a cutoff wheel to grind the PVC IDs to size.

 

Total cost: $20.00...total time spent (minus many hours of planning an designing this in my sleep  :-) )...just two hours of hand work.  Now I have this. see attached pic.

It's currently being held together with white duct tape, until I figure out where and how I'm going to place screws.

 

Because the focuser fully-extended did not quite reach as far as the original Sears focuser which required excessive draw tube extension, I had to find a way to extend the focus range, which I did with a threaded 1 1/4" chrome sink pipe extension.

 

You also might notice the strange star diagonal arrangement.  Looks strange but works.  And, the star diagonal has a SvBony 1 1/4" helical focuser in place of the original star diagonal's EP holder.

 

So, now I have support for 1 1/4" EPs and two helical focusers in the telescope...one in the focuser body and one in the star diagonal.

And, I have a Tasco electric focuser that I might adapt to this.  So, I think I'll finally be able to use my good 1 1/4" EPs and focus sharply at 200x w/o disturbing the scope.

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Orion focuser installed using plumbing matl.jpg

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#5623 SamTheMan

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 09:02 PM

In a previous post, I shared my successful experience upgrading my Sears Model 3 (same as Towa 80mm F15) telescope from .965" EPs to 1 1/4".
This post takes the Sears focuser one more step.. I shall show you how to upgrade the straight-cut focuser to true helical-cut R&P.

 

Here's what you need in advance.
1.  Your original Sears/Towa focuser removed and on a bench or table, comfortable to work at.
2..Good lighting.
3.  4 small screws, washers, and nuts.  I used Ace Hardware...
4.  screws, stock no. 64095, washers stock no. 64097, stock no. 64098

A NOTE ABOUT THE SCREWS...The screws I bought are 1/4" long.  You should buy the next length longer, otherwise, you may not be able to get the nuts to screw onto them
A helical-cut focuser from which you can cannibalize the R&P.
about these parts...
1. The rack must be the same thickness as the rack from the Sears focuser.
2. The pinion gear must be the same diameter as that of the Sears focuser.
3. The potion of the pinion shaft that rests on the focuser must be the same diameter as that of the Sears focuser.

 

A hand drill and small drill bit. (.030" dia. max)
Some very sticky tape (about 2" long 1/2" wide...duct tape is best)...will be used to hold the attaching nut to your finger when you attach the new rack.
Pic 1 sows the Sears focuser afrter I had modified it to support 1 1/4? EPs.
Pic 2 shows the Newtonian focuser that gave its life for this project.
Pic 3 shows the Sears focuser with its rack removed.
Note: the rack is secured with brass rivets, not screws.  Simply drill them out.  Afterwards, you may have to push the remnants from the focus tube.
Pic 4 shows the new helical-cut rack secured with just one screw to the Sears focus tube.  Note that the two holes in the focus tube are closer together than the holes in the rack.  We'll handle this.

Note about the tape:  I attached a small piece of tape to the end of my index finger (doubled over to expose the sticky side and held in this position with another small piece of tape) and used this to "pick up" the nut.  This is the most difficult part of this procedure.

Note:  Without the security of the tape to keep the nut on your finger, you'll find it almost impossible to get the screw to mate with the nut.  My experience.

However, using the tape technique, I only needed a 1/2 dozen attempts before I managed to get the screw to mate with the nut. Good luck.

1.  with just the one screw securely attached and holding the rack to the focus tube, insert the focus tube and rack into the focus body, leaving about 1/4" of the rack exposed.
2.  Now, center the rack, and drill thru the hole in the rack into the focus tube.
3.  Remove the focus tube and secure the loose end of the rack.
4.  Re-insert the focus tube into the focuser, making sure that the rack moves freely over its entire length.
5.  If step 4 is successful, tighten the screws holding the rack if needed and place a tiny drop of Locktite on the nut inside.
6.  Re-insert the focus tube and complete reassembly of the focuser.
You are done.  Good job!
Pic 5 show the completed mod.
Pic 5 shows the completed modification.

You now have a more precise and repeatable functioning focuser.
Enjoy.
Sam

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#5624 SamTheMan

SamTheMan

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 09:40 PM

Opps!  I bought the screws etc at McClendon's Hardware in Sumner, WA NOT ACE Hardware.

  If you need the exact sizes, let me know.

Sam

samdhunt@outlook.com



#5625 SamTheMan

SamTheMan

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  • Joined: 28 Dec 2007
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Posted 17 September 2020 - 10:36 PM

hmmm...not sure why I am seeing this twice, but I have had some trouble with the editor taking me to "la-la" land, so I am now writing the text in Wordpad, then copying and pasting it into the p[ost.

Sorry for the apparent wasted bandwidth.

 

OK. For those of you have been following my Sears focuser trials and tribulations, you might realize that I actually now have two focusing systems that meet my most stringent requirements...

1. Smooth helical-cut R&P

2. Support for 1 1/4" EPs.

 

The Orion focuser solution provided support for 1 1/4" EPs, however, the total body plus focus range was actually about 1 1/2" less than the original Sears focuser.  And, that was a problem for me from the get-go.  I wanted to reduce the required extension of the draw tube in the Sears focuser.  And, although the Orion focuser supports 1 1/4" focusers "out of the box", I still had a serious decision.

 

I have two focusers.

Both support 1 1/4" EPs

Both have smooth helical-cut R&P motion.

Which will I use?

Here's my choice (pic attached)...and the reason.  Finder bracket (and finder) versatility.

The attached pic is of my 70mm F4 finder that I assembled from parts everywhere.  Besides the 70mm F4 objective and bino body (obvious), it incorporates a step-down ring to mate the bino to the SvBony 1 1/4" focuser, a 1 1/4" start diagonal, and (presntly) a 23mm SvBony aspheric EP that I really love.  Magnification?  12X.  Of course, the magnification can be changed by changing the EP, so I have a very nice finder, plus it can be used with Sky Glow and BB filters to make a very nice fast hand-held telescope.

So, the Orion focuser and McClendon's hardware win out.

 

SamTheMan

samdhunt@outlook.com

anyone care to play my Windows computer blackjack program I wrote myself?  It's free.

 

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