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What did you do to your Scope/Mount Today?

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#6001 Terra Nova

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Posted 01 April 2021 - 02:02 PM

Here’s the medium-duty Edmund GEM on the Seco Heavy Duty Birch Wood Surveyors Tripod, easily carrying my Unitron model 114 OTA.

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#6002 mattyfatz

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Posted 01 April 2021 - 02:04 PM

☝️Looking good.


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#6003 SamTheMan

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Posted 01 April 2021 - 05:39 PM

SamTheMan again.

LX50 back on the tripod...WITH WHEELS!

Enjoy

Sam

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#6004 Bob Myler

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Posted 01 April 2021 - 06:54 PM

For a moment there Terra, I thought your Edmund GEM was equipped with a Hargreaves Strut.

I see now that it was only the stair railing in the background....lol.gif

 

 

Here’s the medium-duty Edmund GEM on the Seco Heavy Duty Birch Wood Surveyors Tripod, easily carrying my Unitron model 114 OTA.

 


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#6005 Bomber Bob

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Posted 01 April 2021 - 07:03 PM

1980s Tak SC EQ + 1960s Filo Tripod + BB Scraps Pillar - Assembled:  

 

Tak SC EQ Restore S22 - Filo Tripod Assembled (BEFORE).jpg Tak SC EQ Restore S26 - Filo Tripod Assembled (BEFORE).jpg

 

This is a BEFORE restore for sure.  Cleaned the Filo today, and there are nicks & scratches & stains that warrant refinishing.

 

I took all the photo-related hardware off the EQ - Back to Basics.

 

Hard to see in the pix, but the Filo's legs have a very slight orange in the finish -- better preserved on the inside pieces, of course.  The Filo brand is stamped into just one slider panel with dark brown lettering -- I will mask / preserve it.  I can clean & repaint the hub & spikes in a couple of days, so I'll do those first.  Taking the legs apart will knock it out of use for weeks, so that's a no-go while the weather / seeing is tolerable.

 

The Dark Bronze looks brown here, but in R/L you can see the gold in it, even at sunset.

 

BIF:  Rig as pictured weighs 32 lbs.  The silver column is textured.  Grab it with one hand, and the top of a leg with the other, and it feels lighter -- grab & go for sure.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 02 April 2021 - 06:54 AM.

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#6006 SamTheMan

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Posted 01 April 2021 - 09:53 PM

and...maiden voyage.

she only traveled about fifty feet from my living room to the backyard deck, but there were several twists and turns and uneven terrain along the way and she did good.

And, I didn't have to disassemble her, carry her in pieces to the backyard, and reassemble her because she can go where ever she wants on wheels now.

Sam

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#6007 machvolum

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Posted 03 April 2021 - 11:44 PM

Did some long exposures with my Edmund Rank 3 inch f/11 and observed some strange curved artifacts.. it was not visible with a short exposure or with visual observations. I thought it might be from street lights, turns out it was one of the internal baffles that was warped and loose in the tube. So I took some time to ray trace the tube and 3d print some new baffles which I then sanded to a matt finish. They slid right in the tube with a little force and are held in place by the nuts for the guide scope mount. I am looking forward to some nice clear skies!!!

 

Cheers!!!

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Edited by machvolum, 03 April 2021 - 11:48 PM.

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#6008 Bob Myler

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Posted 04 April 2021 - 08:48 AM

 
Great detective work here and an equally professional fix!

Gotta wonder how many Classic refractors out there have

distorted baffles far removed from where they should be....



#6009 machvolum

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Posted 04 April 2021 - 09:00 AM

 
Great detective work here and an equally professional fix!

Gotta wonder how many Classic refractors out there have

distorted baffles far removed from where they should be....

Thanks Bob! I too wonder. I imagine this was sitting in a hot car or hot storage at some point. And it warped these cheap plastic disks. Plus there was only 2 of them. Ray tracing revealed 5 potential places for baffles. I only made 3 since the drawtube was not worth baffling. I will likely use flocking in there and the front of the tube.

 

Cheers!!


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#6010 Bomber Bob

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Posted 04 April 2021 - 01:52 PM

Painted some of the metal parts on the Filo tripod Dark Bronze today:

 

- Hub has 2 parts -- cast aluminum base + machined aluminum top platter.  I polished the platter, then masked it.  Found traces of the original paint job - a dark orange satin.

 

- Spikes also have 2 parts -- cast aluminum shoe + stainless steel tips.  I painted just the shoes - will polish the tips.

 

- Horseshoe caps on the side leg slats -- thin brass that I think was chrome-plated 55 years ago.  Yellow Brass on the inside / against the wood.  Also, all of bolts, washers, & nuts are / were chromed brass, too.  Each one is in a different state from new-looking to dull gray.  A few of the long bolts have corrosion.  I'll "dry polish" it off with Barkeeper's Helper + an old toothbrush, then wipe them all down with machine oil.


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#6011 ccwemyss

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Posted 04 April 2021 - 06:07 PM

Took the AP 6" f9 apart. The focuser has to go back to AP. I tried to replace the 2" tailpiece with one of their new ones, going from a single thumbscrew to three with a brass band. But the new one is just slightly oversized. So they said to send both back, and they will machine it to fit.

 

At the same time, I want to put in additional baffles. I thought there were two, but it turns out it is just one, about 2/3 of the way down the tube. It's a strange casting that has a flange sticking forward, with an L-shaped lip that I think is intended to create a trap. While the focuser is away, I'll be working on the new baffles.

 

Also did some cleaning of the exterior. I'm debating whether to preserve the classic mediocre original paint job, or see if I can find a local place to powder coat it. 

 

Pulled the mount out of the observatory, trying to get ready to pour a taller concrete pier in place of the tripod.

 

Chip W. 


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#6012 clamchip

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 11:14 AM

Something I'd like to mention if you need to replace a electronic component on a

circuit board.

I suggest snipping the bad part off the board leaving as much of the leads as possible

soldered to the board.

Then solder your new part to these leads.

On my Celestron 6 I snipped the part and removed the leads from the board. This is

better mechanically but difficult and you risk damaging the copper traces. 

Sooner or later you will probably find yourself fixing dead electronics. Some of our 

classics have electronic circuit boards and these may not be available anymore.

Or, you can always move the OTA to a new mount.

 

Robert


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#6013 mikerepp

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 12:54 PM

If you use a solder sucker your bad component will be able to come off the board with a clean hole to solder the new component into.  This is the best way to repair a board.  This is mechanically as well as electrically a better way to repair.

 

Solder suckers are spring loaded with an internal piston.  Heating the connection with the iron and then putting the tip of the sucker over the connection you press a button to release the piston which draws the solder up into the cylinder.  Nice and clean.  No damage to the circuit board and the new component will have a good mechanical/electrical connection.

 

I have had to do what Clamchip suggests, and it does work, but the best way is to use a solder sucker if at all possible.


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#6014 clamchip

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 03:38 PM

If you use a solder sucker your bad component will be able to come off the board with a clean hole to solder the new component into.  This is the best way to repair a board.  This is mechanically as well as electrically a better way to repair.

 

Solder suckers are spring loaded with an internal piston.  Heating the connection with the iron and then putting the tip of the sucker over the connection you press a button to release the piston which draws the solder up into the cylinder.  Nice and clean.  No damage to the circuit board and the new component will have a good mechanical/electrical connection.

 

I have had to do what Clamchip suggests, and it does work, but the best way is to use a solder sucker if at all possible.

Ah yes nice! I want one:

https://www.youtube....h?v=TJkEAOkaL-4

 

Robert


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#6015 Joe1950

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 03:52 PM

Nice tool!

 

There is also solder wick. It’s a flat braided copper wire that will wick up the solder when you have it placed between your iron tip and the solder pad. Usually works nicely.

 

But I don’t do that work much anymore. The SMD components are way to small for my iron and my eyes!


Edited by Joe1950, 06 April 2021 - 04:30 PM.

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#6016 clamchip

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 06:07 PM

You mean like this! from a Meade:

Robert

 

post-50896-0-88176200-1519423874_thumb.jpg


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#6017 Joe1950

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 06:14 PM

Right you are Robert!

 

And if they used discrete components like resistors and capacitors, it’s even worse.

 

I once burned up a circuit on a handheld transceiver. I ordered all the parts that were affected so I could repair it. When they arrived I looked at them and said ‘forget it!’ Just too small.


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#6018 Augustus

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 08:09 PM

Repainted most of the mount of the early RV6. Still need to get a bit around the drive housing, the bottom halves of the rings, and de-rust the counterweight shaft. And fix the backwards RA setting circle, oops. 

 

This is actually my first time really repainting an old scope, and I'm pretty proud of the job I did on the pier.

 

Suggestions on how to remove pitting from the setting circles and rings would be greatly appreciated. Vinegar does nothing.

 

IMG_9504s.jpg


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#6019 RichA

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 10:59 PM

Did some long exposures with my Edmund Rank 3 inch f/11 and observed some strange curved artifacts.. it was not visible with a short exposure or with visual observations. I thought it might be from street lights, turns out it was one of the internal baffles that was warped and loose in the tube. So I took some time to ray trace the tube and 3d print some new baffles which I then sanded to a matt finish. They slid right in the tube with a little force and are held in place by the nuts for the guide scope mount. I am looking forward to some nice clear skies!!!

 

Cheers!!!

3D printing of baffles sounds like an excellent solution.  Baffles are a pain to make out of metal, unless you have specialized equipment. 


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#6020 machvolum

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Posted 07 April 2021 - 01:33 PM

3D printing of baffles sounds like an excellent solution.  Baffles are a pain to make out of metal, unless you have specialized equipment. 

I thought this as well. I had briefly tried to cut a circle out of foam, but realized making a whole cell that slides in would be a better choice so I designed a simple solution in sketchup, printed it and superglued it together. It worked wonderfully. This Friday I will be putting it to the test!

 

Cheers!!


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#6021 Terra Nova

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Posted 07 April 2021 - 02:22 PM

Well not exactly a  telescope or mount per se’ but check out this cool little  hobby mini- table saw that I bought from Amazon. I love it! It’s really neat! Very small and compact, yet very sturdy and well made. It’s heavy and very nice. I’m thrilled! It will be perfect for making precise cuts on small pieces of wood, plastics, etc. for various projects. It was a kit that had to be put together to a degree. The instructions were rather lacking but I figured out how from the pictures and it works like a champ! It’s made by Huanyu Instruments. It even has a secondary axle opening on the side and comes with a small chuck so that a small grinding wheel or other drimel tools can be attached and it can be used as a mini-bench grinder! Next things I want to add to my workshop, a mini-lathe and a mini-mill.

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Edited by Terra Nova, 07 April 2021 - 02:24 PM.

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#6022 mikerepp

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 05:14 AM

Terra, that is very cool.   Can you mount cut off wheels instead of a blade?   If so you could then cut metals on it also.  Would come in real handy when cutting blanks for the mini lathe and mill. laugh.gif


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#6023 Terra Nova

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 08:47 AM

Terra, that is very cool.   Can you mount cut off wheels instead of a blade?   If so you could then cut metals on it also.  Would come in real handy when cutting blanks for the mini lathe and mill. laugh.gif

The 4” circular saw blade is changeable and raises and lowers. So as long as the cut off wheel is thin enough to fit through the slot on the table, I would imagine so. I do have a small Ryobi table top band saw that will cut aluminum plate.


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#6024 godelescher

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 09:08 AM

The 4” circular saw blade is changeable and raises and lowers. So as long as the cut off wheel is thin enough to fit through the slot on the table, I would imagine so. I do have a small Ryobi table top band saw that will cut aluminum plate.

Be careful using that saw to cut small parts. I think I would laminate the whole top (not the miter track) with a piece of formica and then raise the running saw blade through it to make a zero clearance plate. That gap on either side of the blade can grab small off-cuts and launch them back at you. A zero-clearance top will also give you cleaner cuts.

 

Also, replacing the sacrificial wood on the miter gauge with a longer one and then running it through the blade will leave you with a miter fence that's perfectly in line with the blade.

 

It looks like a handy little saw, but it could use some mods to make it safer and more accurate.


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#6025 mikerepp

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 10:24 AM

I was checking these out this morning on Amazon.   They have a lot of different models. Which one is this one the 150W or the 300W?   They have a black one that has a 40mm cut height that shows that it cuts metal also (in the pictures).  Very neat little saw.  Let us know how well it works for you.


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