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What did you do to your Scope/Mount Today?

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#8626 Kasmos

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Posted 19 February 2024 - 03:07 AM

I refelted the C5 lens cover with self adhesive felt. It's a rotary cutter, it makes a clean precision cut, a true

game changer for cutting fabric. My wife is a quilter and saves her worn out blades for me.

Robert

 

attachicon.gif IMG_2064.JPG

attachicon.gif IMG_2066.JPG

Where did you get self adhesive felt that thin?

The stuff at Ace is too thick for a lot of applications.



#8627 norvegicus

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Posted 19 February 2024 - 09:14 AM

I use this 1mm thick felt tape.  Comes in 1/2", 3/4", 1"

 

https://www.amazon.c...uct/B01B6ATAK8/


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#8628 clamchip

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Posted 19 February 2024 - 11:49 AM

Where did you get self adhesive felt that thin?

The stuff at Ace is too thick for a lot of applications.

I buy it at a craft store Ben Franklin the brand is Presto Felt.

 

Robert


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#8629 deSitter

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Posted 19 February 2024 - 12:29 PM

Where did you get self adhesive felt that thin?

The stuff at Ace is too thick for a lot of applications.

I get 8x11 sheets of it - the kind you see on chess pieces, very thin, and the adhesive is super sticky.

 

Comes in colors (as well). "She's like a raaain - bow"

 

https://www.amazon.c...adhesive backed

 

-drl


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#8630 Kasmos

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Posted 19 February 2024 - 02:30 PM

I buy it at a craft store Ben Franklin the brand is Presto Felt.

 

Robert

waytogo.gif Cool. I looked it up and my local Joann fabric and craft store that carries it.


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#8631 clamchip

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Posted 19 February 2024 - 06:32 PM

waytogo.gif Cool. I looked it up and my local Joann fabric and craft store that carries it.

The black is a perfect thickness for the Celestron C5 dust cover so it will probably also be

just right for the C8.  The last thing we want is one of these beautiful spun aluminum dust

covers dented from falling off unexpectedly.

 

Robert 



#8632 Kasmos

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Posted 19 February 2024 - 08:36 PM

The black is a perfect thickness for the Celestron C5 dust cover so it will probably also be

just right for the C8.  The last thing we want is one of these beautiful spun aluminum dust

covers dented from falling off unexpectedly.

 

Robert 

I've been in need some thin black adhesive backed felt for some White Vixen tube clamps so I can paint the clamps black.

I've been delaying it because they are brand new and they will need new felt when I do it.


Edited by Kasmos, 19 February 2024 - 08:36 PM.


#8633 ccwemyss

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Posted 20 February 2024 - 05:22 PM

The lock ring for the Pentax focuser came from Precise Parts today. It perfectly fits the threads, and is only about 2mm thick. I was able to use it to lock the 2" diagonal, that has matching threads, in the upright position, so it doesn't flop over. Tested with a UO 40mm MK-70 Konig, and it comes to focus with plenty of room to spare. 

 

Chip W. 


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#8634 clamchip

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Posted 24 February 2024 - 08:18 PM

I did it again, I spent nearly the entire day looking for something.

It's tough because I get started and I'm easily distracted with that I find

during my journey. It is good exercise and I will reward myself with

lots of ice cream tonight.

 

Robert


Edited by clamchip, 24 February 2024 - 08:31 PM.

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#8635 Kasmos

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Posted 24 February 2024 - 10:49 PM

I did it again, I spent nearly the entire day looking for something.

It's tough because I get started and I'm easily distracted with that I find

during my journey. It is good exercise and I will reward myself with

lots of ice cream tonight.

 

Robert

I do the same thing.

But I don't need any reason to reward myself icecream grin.gif


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#8636 deSitter

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Posted 25 February 2024 - 03:58 AM

I do the same thing.

But I don't need any reason to reward myself icecream grin.gif

I reward myself with a Maker's Mark BEFORE getting started. That always works.

 

Today I had a bright idea. I am adapting the tripod head plate of my LXD650 mount to sit on a much shorter tripod. This requires a 6" aluminum circular plate to adapt the hub on the short tripod to the head plate. I had to reproduce the hexagonal bolt pattern on the bottom of the plate exactly. I measured and measured and drew triangles and erased them and did it again and then suddenly had a brainstorm. I had one of those screen protectors in large format that was never going to be used (not even sure how I came by it, I don't use those things). I cut out a circle of this stuff to stick over the bolt pattern and made a direct copy of it on the clear film. Then I peeled this off and stuck it to the aluminum disk and presto, drill baby drill and the whole process took an hour and a half of dithering followed by 10 minutes of solution. Very simple way to reproduce a bolt pattern without fuss.

 

-drl


Edited by deSitter, 25 February 2024 - 04:19 AM.

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#8637 norvegicus

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Posted 25 February 2024 - 08:39 AM

I reward myself with a Maker's Mark BEFORE getting started. That always works.

Today I had a bright idea. I am adapting the tripod head plate of my LXD650 mount to sit on a much shorter tripod. This requires a 6" aluminum circular plate to adapt the hub on the short tripod to the head plate. I had to reproduce the hexagonal bolt pattern on the bottom of the plate exactly. I measured and measured and drew triangles and erased them and did it again and then suddenly had a brainstorm. I had one of those screen protectors in large format that was never going to be used (not even sure how I came by it, I don't use those things). I cut out a circle of this stuff to stick over the bolt pattern and made a direct copy of it on the clear film. Then I peeled this off and stuck it to the aluminum disk and presto, drill baby drill and the whole process took an hour and a half of dithering followed by 10 minutes of solution. Very simple way to reproduce a bolt pattern without fuss.

-drl

Beer is my beginning drink for thinking tasks. (I’m part owner of a brewery and also homebrew.)

Taking on 3D printing as a hobby has prompted me to switch to digital means for getting things like bolt patterns just right. Drawing such things in CAD software is quick and accurate and easily editable ( after learning the software workflow of course, which is a time investment but a very worthwhile one)and I can print either paper templates or a 3D plastic template for drilling, or of course just print the part if appropriate. I’ve designed and printed a bunch of mount adapters with great results.

Edited by norvegicus, 25 February 2024 - 08:40 AM.

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#8638 clamchip

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Posted 25 February 2024 - 02:25 PM

I did something interesting this morning I tested a modern Maksutov.

You know, these modern scopes are made by computers, lets see what we got.

Well it's overcorrected by a small amount.

It's my Orion 5 inch. It has moving primary focus like a SCT so I could watch during

test as the correction changed as I moved the primary. I found the best correction

just a few inches out from the rear port. So if you own one of these you might try

observing without a diagonal, just the eyepiece for best correction. I'll try it now

myself although the telescope is excellent with a diagonal in place, it will no doubt

be better the closer you can get your eye to the rear port. Providing Synta

didn't change the mirror spacing. Or maybe as they come out of polishing the

correction is variable, maybe the computer can't make every one the same.

 

Robert


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#8639 clamchip

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 02:40 PM

Today I bench tested my orange C90 Astro.

It was a little difficult because of the barrel focuser, the whole front of the tube rotates

for focus like a SLR camera lens and not very bench test friendly.

I was surprised to see jail bars both sides of focus. Also I was surprised to see color on

those jail bars in white light, it looks a little like CA to me, I'm not sure what to think

of that. But let's pretend we didn't see that, I think its meaningless with this design.

Celestron did an amazing job considering it's a rotating meniscus along with a

rotating secondary too. Not to mention an extremely fast f/11 for a Mak.

My C90 focuser thread grease had long since dried up, I gave it a lube job with Mobil 1

completely tightening things up, and I'm sure this makes an enormous difference if you

have one of these odd rotate tube focus Maks. Use Mobil 1 full synthetic the red

stuff it is perfect for this job. Use enough Mobil 1 in the threads to remove all play

while rotating the barrel. 

Robert 

 

IMG_1830.JPG

IMG_1832.JPG


Edited by clamchip, 27 February 2024 - 02:56 PM.

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#8640 deSitter

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 04:14 PM

It's such a fast Mak you are seeing CA from the very steep meniscus. The primary looks like f/2, which is insanely fast. I have a Meade "mirror lens" 90mm f/11 Mak that isn't very good as a telescope compared to the ETX90. It also has a f/2 primary. It's a shame because it is amazingly well made. Although it's 30 years old the focus is very smooth.

 

-drl


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#8641 Kasmos

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 04:21 PM

Today I bench tested my orange C90 Astro.

It was a little difficult because of the barrel focuser, the whole front of the tube rotates

for focus like a SLR camera lens and not very bench test friendly.

I was surprised to see jail bars both sides of focus. Also I was surprised to see color on

those jail bars in white light, it looks a little like CA to me, I'm not sure what to think

of that. But let's pretend we didn't see that, I think its meaningless with this design.

Celestron did an amazing job considering it's a rotating meniscus along with a

rotating secondary too. Not to mention an extremely fast f/11 for a Mak.

My C90 focuser thread grease had long since dried up, I gave it a lube job with Mobil 1

completely tightening things up, and I'm sure this makes an enormous difference if you

have one of these odd rotate tube focus Maks. Use Mobil 1 full synthetic the red

stuff it is perfect for this job. Use enough Mobil 1 in the threads to remove all play

while rotating the barrel. 

Robert 

 

attachicon.gif IMG_1830.JPG

attachicon.gif IMG_1832.JPG

Mine is way overdue for servicing so it has loose and tight spots.

That and the RA needs adjusting so it made focusing a little difficult.

But even with the challenge of both problems,

the other day it gave great images of a transformer label I test scopes on.

The image was brighter and probably sharper that any 60mm refractor I have.

Since its so light, easy to set up, and has a built in drive, at one time it was my most often used telescope.


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#8642 clamchip

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 06:55 PM

I'm having so much fun I decided to test a few more Maks.

Sorry I have so many, these are rescues, they all were broken. And this group is actually probably post

2000, except the ETX is very early, probably 1996.

The Bushnell North Star 90mm (Synta) is overcorrected, and the worst correction of the bunch but still at

the eyepiece a very sharp telescope. All of these are all excellent at the eyepiece. 

Orion 127mm (Synta), very slight overcorrection.

ETX 90, (Meade) very very slight overcorrection, almost can't see it.

 

Surprise surprise, Orion 90mm (Synta) jail bars! with a very slight clocking to the bars, which could be me

in my set up or a touch of astigmatism. This telescope is superb, I knew it would test well.

I found it in a pawn shop, I initially saw a craig's list ad for it.

Upon examining before purchase I couldn't help noticing the primary was loose sliding along the baffle tube

bashing against the corrector and what was left of the focusing mechanism.  I'm pretty sure it got knocked

over and hit the floor. Once they knew it was broken, and they had a fish, and they could tell I was looking

for a project, they let me have it for a much discounted price.

One carefully placed drop of super glue, and I cleaned all the grease off the meniscus, and thankfully that

was it. Now such a perfect test, I can't even imagine this beautiful glass may have ended up in a land fill. 

Robert 

 

IMG_2071.JPG

IMG_2073.JPG


Edited by clamchip, 27 February 2024 - 07:10 PM.

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#8643 jkmccarthy

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 06:28 AM

My recent accomplishment has been modifying the top cap[*] of the 5-inch diameter x 9-inch half-pillar extension --- which I use atop a Celestron 2-inch tubular steel tripod --- so that in addition to the Vixen GP it will also accept a heavier-duty Vixen SP-DX equatorial mount.

 

SP-DX_vs_GP_850px.jpg

 

To do this I enlarged the M10-threaded hole in the bottom center of the pocket to 0.987-inches diameter so it centers the bottom of the 25mm (0.984-inches) stud of the SP-DX, which I now clamp in place from underneath using an M12 bolt and a thick washer that is 40mm in diameter.

 

Half-Pillar_Top-Cap_Mods_850pix.jpg

 

Here is the classic SP-DX heavy-duty equatorial head now, solidly affixed the modified half-pillar:

 

IMG_3360c_850pix.jpg

 

Conservatively, the SP-DX mount has been reported to have had no trouble handling OTAs weighing up to at least 25 lbs (e.g., https://www.cloudyni...s-dx/?p=8277556 ) for visual observations --- indeed it has greater load capacity than the later GP-DX [aka GPD] head (see posts 3 + 4 in the thread just referenced) --- so I was confident it could carry a SkyWatcher 180mm Maksutov, which tips the scale at just under 20 lbs.   To mate the OTA's V-style dovetail, I drilled + tapped two 1/4-20 holes (160mm = 6.30-inches apart) into the bottom of a 7-inch (178mm) long Farpoint Astro V-style dovetail saddle clamp, in order to bolt the V-style dovetail clamp across the top of the SP-DX saddle, using the existing OTA attachment holes (but with two stainless steel 1/4-20 socket head cap screws + washers replacing [for now] the original two Vixen captured screws having black plastic knobs and C-clips).

 

FARPOINT_FVS_Dovetail-Saddle_Mods_850pix.jpg

 

IMG_3360d_850pix.jpg

 

Personally I'm pleased with both how long *and* how low-profile this V-style dovetail saddle implementation is using the Farpoint Astro FVS saddle, compared to the much greater weight and thicker (causing the OTA to move further outboard of the R.A. axis, increasing its inertia as well as that of the counterweights) ADM and StellarVue saddles I've used retrofitted onto other Carton and Vixen mounts previously.   The only thing I might do differently (and still could) would be to replace both of my 1/4-20 tapped holes into the Farpoint Astro aluminum saddle plate with steel threaded inserts (whose exterior threads into the aluminum would then be larger diameter and coarser pitch , and whose internal 1/4-20 threads would obviously then be in steel not in aluminum), allowing higher torque without fear of stripping the threads (in the Farpoint aluminum saddle plate) on the two 1/4-20 cap screws through the holes in the Vixen saddle.

 

Clear Skies,

 

        -- Jim

 

_________

 

[*] Originally this was a 125mm dia. disk, 30mm thick, into which was machined a 60mm I.D. x 20mm deep pocket with a captured M10 bolt in the bottom center, designed to accept either a Vixen SP or GP equatorial mount.


Edited by jkmccarthy, 28 February 2024 - 06:43 AM.

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#8644 CHASLX200

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 06:51 AM



My recent accomplishment has been modifying the top cap[*] of the 5-inch diameter x 9-inch half-pillar extension --- which I use atop a Celestron 2-inch tubular steel tripod --- so that in addition to the Vixen GP it will also accept a heavier-duty Vixen SP-DX equatorial mount.

 

attachicon.gif SP-DX_vs_GP_850px.jpg

 

To do this I enlarged the M10-threaded hole in the bottom center of the pocket to 0.987-inches diameter so it centers the bottom of the 25mm (0.984-inches) stud of the SP-DX, which I now clamp in place from underneath using an M12 bolt and a thick washer that is 40mm in diameter.

 

attachicon.gif Half-Pillar_Top-Cap_Mods_850pix.jpg

 

Here is the classic SP-DX heavy-duty equatorial head now, solidly affixed the modified half-pillar:

 

attachicon.gif IMG_3360c_850pix.jpg

 

Conservatively, the SP-DX mount has been reported to have had no trouble handling OTAs weighing up to at least 25 lbs (e.g., https://www.cloudyni...s-dx/?p=8277556 ) for visual observations --- indeed it has greater load capacity than the later GP-DX [aka GPD] head (see posts 3 + 4 in the thread just referenced) --- so I was confident it could carry a SkyWatcher 180mm Maksutov, which tips the scale at just under 20 lbs.   To mate the OTA's V-style dovetail, I drilled + tapped two 1/4-20 holes (160mm = 6.30-inches apart) into the bottom of a 7-inch (178mm) long Farpoint Astro V-style dovetail saddle clamp, in order to bolt the V-style dovetail clamp across the top of the SP-DX saddle, using the existing OTA attachment holes (but with two stainless steel 1/4-20 socket head cap screws + washers replacing [for now] the original two Vixen captured screws having black plastic knobs and C-clips).

 

attachicon.gif FARPOINT_FVS_Dovetail-Saddle_Mods_850pix.jpg

 

attachicon.gif IMG_3360d_850pix.jpg

 

Personally I'm pleased with both how long *and* how low-profile this V-style dovetail saddle implementation is using the Farpoint Astro FVS saddle, compared to the much greater weight and thicker (causing the OTA to move further outboard of the R.A. axis, increasing its inertia as well as that of the counterweights) ADM and StellarVue saddles I've used retrofitted onto other Carton and Vixen mounts previously.   The only thing I might do differently (and still could) would be to replace both of my 1/4-20 tapped holes into the Farpoint Astro aluminum saddle plate with steel threaded inserts (whose exterior threads into the aluminum would then be larger diameter and coarser pitch , and whose internal 1/4-20 threads would obviously then be in steel not in aluminum), allowing higher torque without fear of stripping the threads (in the Farpoint aluminum saddle plate) on the two 1/4-20 cap screws through the holes in the Vixen saddle.

 

Clear Skies,

 

        -- Jim

 

_________

 

[*] Originally this was a 125mm dia. disk, 30mm thick, into which was machined a 60mm I.D. x 20mm deep pocket with a captured M10 bolt in the bottom center, designed to accept either a Vixen SP or GP equatorial mount.

The hub of my GP is the same of the CG5 i think. 



#8645 deSitter

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 07:28 AM



My recent accomplishment has been modifying the top cap[*] of the 5-inch diameter x 9-inch half-pillar extension --- which I use atop a Celestron 2-inch tubular steel tripod --- so that in addition to the Vixen GP it will also accept a heavier-duty Vixen SP-DX equatorial mount.

 

attachicon.gif SP-DX_vs_GP_850px.jpg

 

To do this I enlarged the M10-threaded hole in the bottom center of the pocket to 0.987-inches diameter so it centers the bottom of the 25mm (0.984-inches) stud of the SP-DX, which I now clamp in place from underneath using an M12 bolt and a thick washer that is 40mm in diameter.

 

attachicon.gif Half-Pillar_Top-Cap_Mods_850pix.jpg

 

Here is the classic SP-DX heavy-duty equatorial head now, solidly affixed the modified half-pillar:

 

attachicon.gif IMG_3360c_850pix.jpg

 

Conservatively, the SP-DX mount has been reported to have had no trouble handling OTAs weighing up to at least 25 lbs (e.g., https://www.cloudyni...s-dx/?p=8277556 ) for visual observations --- indeed it has greater load capacity than the later GP-DX [aka GPD] head (see posts 3 + 4 in the thread just referenced) --- so I was confident it could carry a SkyWatcher 180mm Maksutov, which tips the scale at just under 20 lbs.   To mate the OTA's V-style dovetail, I drilled + tapped two 1/4-20 holes (160mm = 6.30-inches apart) into the bottom of a 7-inch (178mm) long Farpoint Astro V-style dovetail saddle clamp, in order to bolt the V-style dovetail clamp across the top of the SP-DX saddle, using the existing OTA attachment holes (but with two stainless steel 1/4-20 socket head cap screws + washers replacing [for now] the original two Vixen captured screws having black plastic knobs and C-clips).

 

attachicon.gif FARPOINT_FVS_Dovetail-Saddle_Mods_850pix.jpg

 

attachicon.gif IMG_3360d_850pix.jpg

 

Personally I'm pleased with both how long *and* how low-profile this V-style dovetail saddle implementation is using the Farpoint Astro FVS saddle, compared to the much greater weight and thicker (causing the OTA to move further outboard of the R.A. axis, increasing its inertia as well as that of the counterweights) ADM and StellarVue saddles I've used retrofitted onto other Carton and Vixen mounts previously.   The only thing I might do differently (and still could) would be to replace both of my 1/4-20 tapped holes into the Farpoint Astro aluminum saddle plate with steel threaded inserts (whose exterior threads into the aluminum would then be larger diameter and coarser pitch , and whose internal 1/4-20 threads would obviously then be in steel not in aluminum), allowing higher torque without fear of stripping the threads (in the Farpoint aluminum saddle plate) on the two 1/4-20 cap screws through the holes in the Vixen saddle.

 

Clear Skies,

 

        -- Jim

 

_________

 

[*] Originally this was a 125mm dia. disk, 30mm thick, into which was machined a 60mm I.D. x 20mm deep pocket with a captured M10 bolt in the bottom center, designed to accept either a Vixen SP or GP equatorial mount.


I am involved in a very similar process adapting a LXD650 mount head to a latter-day LXD75/Exos2 2" legged tripod, which will lower my 10" scope by nearly a foot vs. the stock Meade tripod (same essentially as the 8" and 10" SCT tripod). I will post pics when complete.

 

My Celestron 180mm Mak lives happily on my LXD75. No sweat at all. Very stable.

 

-drl


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#8646 Terra Nova

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 10:55 AM

And use some oil doyle.   A drop of oil and going slow would have saved you from having to buy new bits, as well as finished the job in 1/3 the time.  bangbang.gif

And you can use a little kerosene as a cutting fluid when working AC grade aluminum. It works great when using a lathe or mill.


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#8647 Terra Nova

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 11:01 AM

I got tripods coming out the ying yang.

Ouch! That’s gotta hurt!



#8648 Terra Nova

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 11:08 AM

The other day I noticed my local Ace Hardware is replacing some of the Bakelite knobs with

modern (cheezy) equivalent replacements. I thought to myself,

"Here we go, wrinkle gray, Converse All Stars, and now Bakelite knobs. Lord, I'm ready."

Today I visited another Ace over by my moms and found a much larger selection of Bakelite 

knobs than I've ever seen before, it's like a Super Ace. I guess we are safe for a while. 

I feel the Bakelite knob's days are numbered. 

While I was at the 'Super' Ace I couldn't help noticing a table covered with candy 50% off and

even 75% off on your choice of Jalapeno or Pumpkin peanut brittle. I picked Jalapeno and it

never made it home, I didn't think I would like it. I also bought those hard to find neoprene

washers found under our Bakelite knobs used on our classics for the perfect feel. I bought

a few knobs too. 

 

Robert

Wow! Is it real bakelite Robert? I didn’t realize they were making anything anymore with real bakelite.



#8649 Terra Nova

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 11:18 AM

Beer is my beginning drink for thinking tasks. (I’m part owner of a brewery and also homebrew.)

Taking on 3D printing as a hobby has prompted me to switch to digital means for getting things like bolt patterns just right. Drawing such things in CAD software is quick and accurate and easily editable ( after learning the software workflow of course, which is a time investment but a very worthwhile one)and I can print either paper templates or a 3D plastic template for drilling, or of course just print the part if appropriate. I’ve designed and printed a bunch of mount adapters with great results.

My dad used to make a 30 gallon crock of homebrew every spring. When it was finally done ’cooking’ it was time for the bottling, and that was a family operation! I have fond memories of helping my mom and dad with that. My dad always determined when it ready for bottling by floating a hygrometer in it. Once I guess it wasn’t quite ready and it got bottled a little two soon. We had a particularly warm June that year. We heard a weird popping sound coming from the garage. Three or four cases blew up! What a mess! Ah, good times! :lol:



#8650 clamchip

clamchip

    Hubble

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  • Posts: 13,433
  • Joined: 09 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Seattle

Posted 28 February 2024 - 11:18 AM

They call it phenolic I know it's Bakelite. I could grind on one then I would know for sure, the

aroma is unmistakable.

Most of the Ace knobs are for kitchen use and must handle high temp, pot and pan knobs, etc.

 

Robert 


Edited by clamchip, 28 February 2024 - 11:19 AM.

  • Terra Nova likes this


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