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supernova bubble nr Albireo

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#1 nytecam

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 10:46 AM

Last night I was recording M56 GC in Lyra with Wikisky running on my laptop at the telescope.  Panning Wiki east I spied a very faint inclined 180 deg arc or partial 'bubble' immediately above [north] of Albireo [beta Cyg] ~2-1/2 degs in diameter as below.  It seems like an ancient supernova shockwave bubble.  Does it have a name?

 

Nytecam . 

Attached Thumbnails

  • albireo bubblex.jpg

Edited by nytecam, 19 May 2015 - 12:47 PM.

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#2 MrJones

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 11:25 AM

You could email Richard McCray and ask if you don't get an answer here.

 

http://jilawww.colorado.edu/~dick/



#3 MikeK314

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 11:38 AM

The large bright section at the bottom is Sharpless 91 (Sh2-91) and the strand at 2 o'clock is Sharpless 94 (Sh2-94).  I don't think the other bits (or the whole thing) has a name, but would also be interested to know if it does.  I'm familiar with this region but hadn't noticed how these pieces seem to fit together in an arc, so thanks for that.


Edited by MikeK314, 19 May 2015 - 11:38 AM.


#4 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 12:54 PM

Those two somewhat arcuate and better defined lineaments are intriguingly suggestive of their sharing a common front from an expanding bubble. The more diffuse patches which seem to delineate a void are less so; the different morphology argues against a commonality. And we must ever be wary of our visual system's propensity to construct patterns. ;)

I wonder if the WHAM (Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper) data has sufficient angular resolution to discriminate any radial velocity differences in this region. If sufficiently different, this would likely settle the matter.

#5 MrJones

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 02:06 PM

Well done! More info here http://galaxymap.org...st/sharpless/91



#6 MikeK314

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 04:24 PM

Ah, so yes, it's a supernova remnant.  SIMBAD has it under the name SNR G065.2+05.7.



#7 David Knisely

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 11:55 PM

I saw the lower arc Sh2-91 in a 25 inch Newtonian with an OIII filter at the Nebraska Star Party and it was fairly easy but not exactly brilliant (at the time, we were hunting for the "proto-planetary" nebula Minkowski 1-92 and ran into the arc by mistake).  Clear skies to you. 



#8 sgottlieb

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 02:33 PM

I've observed the section of Sh 2-91 near Phi Cygni (V = 4.7) several times -- a dark sky and an OIII filter are the key (as David's post suggests).  Here's my last observation with my 18-inch Starmaster from the Sierra Buttes (7200' elevation) --

 

18" (8/2/05):  Sh 2-91 was immediately picked up in the field of Phi Cygni (15' to the south) at 115x and OIII filter as a huge, narrow, faint filament stretching across 13'-14' of the field.  It begins close to mag 8.2 HD 185735 and extends to the NE, passing just south of mag 9.6 HD 332384 (7.7' from the mag 8 star).  It continues northeast, brightening somewhat and heads towards a 30" pair of mag 11 stars where it seems to spread out and dim.  Overall, the filament is fairly straight, but gently arcs a bit near the center and at times appears split into two strands.

 

Another section I've seen is near 9 Cygni (V = 5.4).  This observation is with my 24-inch from Lake San Antonio in central California --

 

24" (9/13/12): at 125x and OIII filter, I was surprised to immediately see a huge filament stretching at least 30' east-west across much of the field in the 21mm Ethos.  The filament tapered at the east end and fanned out on the west end.  The surface brightness was a bit uneven; brighter along the boundary, particularly noticed on the southwest edge and weaker within the broader fan portion on the west end.

 

More information, observations and labeled images is on Deep Sky Forum


Edited by sgottlieb, 20 May 2015 - 02:36 PM.

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#9 reiner

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 02:44 PM

This SNR is similar in size to the Veil, but it's almost twice as distant and substantially older. Hence quite a bit more difficult to observe. Nevertheless, most parts are accessible to visual observation.

 

I have spent quite some time on this SNR and observed most of the brighter filaments with my 22". My notes as well as a detailed finder chart are here http://www.reinervog...Sh91_SNR_e.html

 

SH91_findersmall.jpg

 

A large version of this finder chart is here

http://www.reinervog...1_finderbig.jpg


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#10 Mel Bartels

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Posted 22 July 2015 - 09:25 PM

Rather than start a new thread I thought I'd add to an older discussion.

 

Two sketches showing how I progressively sketch a difficult object. Each sketch is about 1.5 hours of effort at the eyepiece.

 

As I observe, features brighten into view, more extensions and graduations are noticed. The subsequent night, aided by my initial sketch, I remember visually what I saw and gradually see more of the supernova remnant.

 

Surprisingly, I cannot see the short arcs visible in Howard Banich's 28 inch [71cm]. Instead I see broad featureless strokes of varying brightness and thickness. I am able to see the SN's features with scopes from 6 inches [15cm] to 13.2 inches [34cm].

 

SN%20remnant%20G65.3%205.7%20progressive


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#11 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 22 July 2015 - 10:18 PM

Very impressive composite sketch, Mel! I wonder what might be seen using an image intensifier with H-alpha filter, perhaps with a focal reducer ahead of the intensifier so as to deliver the highest surface brightness...



#12 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 23 July 2015 - 05:05 AM

Cool sketches, thanks for the views.  :waytogo:

 

Rich (RLTYS)



#13 JayinUT

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Posted 23 July 2015 - 12:40 PM

I have observed this SNR several times in my 14" and my 17.5" and once in my 24".  Dark Skies and an OIII filter are key as shared already.  Sky & Telescope has an article online about observing this and with a wide field image that shows the entire bubble.  Here is the LINK




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