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Mewlon - why not?

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#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 06:33 PM

I've just started reading about these and they sound really intriguing - big aperatures, fine optics, much cheaper than refractors. So I need something to daydream about and they do the trick. I'm surprised I haven't seen more about them out here.

Wanted to get people's thoughts on these - how are they optically, what are they like to lug around, how do you mount 'em? Any cons to these? How they do versus an SCT or Refractor?

Thanks,

chuck

#2 Suk Lee

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 06:37 PM

Just terrific scopes.

Read:

http://www.cloudynig...s/mewlon250.htm
http://www.cloudynig...3/mewlon300.htm
http://www.cloudynig...y/Mewlon250.htm
http://www.cloudynig...iews/mewlon.htm
http://www.scottsqui..._mewlon_250.htm
http://www.scottsqui...50_vs_fs152.htm

Cheers,
Suk

#3 wilash

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 09:39 PM

The Mewlons are excellent telescopes, but thay are not Catadioptric. They catoptric (reflectors) as they only use mirrors.

#4 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 06 March 2004 - 02:21 AM

Why not, indeed. I got one recently. I haven't used it enough to comment on its performance, but it's a well built telescope. Unlike other Tak scopes it comes with a dovetail system, which makes it easy to balance. The finderscope that doubles as a handle is a great feature. I can easily lift this 18-pound telescope and secure it on the mount by myself.

I guess it does have a couple of disadvantages compared to refractors. Its secondary is supported by four spiders so you get diffaction spikes, just like on a Newtonian. The Mewlon 210 focuses by moving the primary so there is some image shift, like most SCTs. Also with the 2415mm focal length it can get a little claustrophobic - again, just like a SCT. But since an 8" Mewlon costs about the same as a high-end 4" APO, I'm willing to overlook these minor quirks.

By the way, take a look at Suk's web page. He has some spectacular solar and planetary photos taken with his Mewlon 250. :bow:

#5 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 09 March 2004 - 11:12 AM

I've seen better reviews of the 250/300 series than the 180/210 series -- probably due to image shift with the smaller models. Also, bigger scope = bigger mount. Mewlon vs. refractor wins on the apeture per dollar scale, but you'll need a bigger mount to hold it.

#6 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 10 March 2004 - 12:17 AM

Mewlon vs. refractor wins on the apeture per dollar scale, but you'll need a bigger mount to hold it.

You're right, if you are comparing Mewlon vs. refractor at the same price point, the Mewlon needs a larger mount. But if you are comparing the two at similar apertures, the Mewlon is much lighter than a refractor. The Mewlon 180 is only a pound heavier than the FS-102, and a couple of pounds lighter than the FS-128.

#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 10 March 2004 - 03:55 AM

I've been very interested the Mewlon's since I had a chance to check one out in Japan. The planetary images I've seen produced with them are absolutely stunning, particularly those on this page.

Ken, if you don't mind, how do you say "collimation" in Japanese? Is it just spelled out in kana? For some odd reason, I always thought there was a word for it. Thanks very much!

-John

#8 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 10 March 2004 - 06:57 AM

Collimation in Japanese is "ko-jiku cho-sei". It literally means "optical axis adjsutment."

#9 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 10 March 2004 - 01:45 PM

Thanks, Ken. I explained it as best as I could to my wife (she's Japanese) but it bothered me that I didn't know the Japanese word for it.

-John


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