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A Newbie's Early Observation Log - Join me!

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#6576 Pbinder

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Posted Today, 08:18 AM

T-3           7-8pm

S-2

52 degrees   Low Humid

 

Went out last night to observe the waxing moon. It appeared to be average visibility night on Long Island with the moon clearly visible. Through the scope however view was below average. The previous night I was resolving images at almost 300x seemed to max around 200x last evening. Makes you really appreciate those clear nights. 

 

Also tried for some dso's but the seeing was so bad I gave that. Tried to find Neptune as it was several degrees above moon giving me a good jump off point. I have no idea if I saw it or not. Was pretty sure I saw a dot that appeared tinted blue but so small it could of just been wishful thinking that a star was Neptune. 

 

Skysafari said it was 7.8 magnitude. Would that even be visible with 8inch dob from suburban skies?  Uranus was 5.7 any chance that would be visible? 


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#6577 jklein

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Posted Today, 08:44 AM

In observance of International Observe the Moon Night, I set up up the scope - plus it was the first time in 10 days we have had skies clear enough to see anything except skyglow.

68/46%/slight breeze

 

I set up in the front yard at 1820 to see if any passers by would take a look. Moon was just rising over the trees, but of course the sky was still well lit by the not yet set sun. I had opted to use the 6.3 F/R to allow for a wider angle view of the moon. I also inserted the moon filter on the diagonal so I wouldn't have to change it between eyepieces. (...........Waiting for Ed to talk about the efficiencies of a zoom ocular.........).

 

At 1850 a young couple pushing a stroller passed by but did not take me up on my offer to show them the moon. Meanwhile, I was orienting myself using Moon Globe HD, and was fairly confident in identifying Tycho (of course!), Clavius, Copernicus, Galiendi, Heredotus, and Aristarchus.

 

At 1720, the neighbor's family came over and looked through with a scattering of oohs and aahs.  After they left, I looked around for some favorites, but they were lost in a thin layer of clouds. Packed up at 2010. Glad for the clear night, and the opportunity to be a bit more diligent in crater ID.


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#6578 SeaBee1

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Posted Today, 08:53 AM

Jim, had I not been at work last night, I would have had a scope out as well.... as it was, I did take a look at the moon a couple of times on the drive home... even without optical aid, it is a glorious sight...

 

I am hoping tonight will be unbusy and clear so that I can get some scope time...

 

Clear skies!

 

CB


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#6579 Pbinder

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Posted Today, 10:14 AM

Disregard my question on magnitude. Looked it up myself. My scope easily can view well beyond 7th magnitude. 


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#6580 JHollJr

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Posted Today, 11:32 AM

October 20, 2018
Evening
18:25. I stepped out front with my 10x50’s as the sun was setting and took a look at the moon. The skies were clear with good transparency, as far as I could tell in the early evening. The two features that impressed me were the roundness of Mare Humorum, and the striking appendage of Mare Imbrium in the shape of Mare Iridium. There is also a nasty gash of white material across Mare Serenitatis. I took a closer look with the 18x50’s at 18:35, but the color and shading contrasts with the 10x50s were much better.


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#6581 Tyson M

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Posted Today, 01:48 PM

Oct 20, 2018

 

With clear skies, 87.3% illuminated moon, and intermittent bouts of bad seeing and transparency, I decided to make the trip to the dark site with a friend.

 

I set up two refractors and had a look at anything I could think of, from 21:00 to 01:30, when the transparency took a dive for the worse. 

 

With my Starcannon, I had a look at:

 

Double cluster- stunning

M45 - nebulosity detected

M31 and M110- amazing at beginning of the night with 31N and 22N

M35- looked good up to 10D

M34

M27 - transparency wasnt the greatest, not as sharp

NGC457 - Owl cluster, looked great

M1- barely detectable with and without a UHC

M38- starfish cluster

M36

M37

 

With my Stardagger:

 

Spent a long time on the moon and showing others, who were very impressed with the views with and without the orange filter

M45 - very faint nebulosity detected

M35- faint but detectable

M38- starfish cluster

M36

M37

Vega, Capella, Algol

Hyades cluster

and Alpha Persei moving group

 

With my binoculars:

 

M45

Hyades

Alpha Persei moving group

Swept up MW around Cassiopeia

 

I also saw a meteor or a bolide break up upon entry into the atmosphere.  Had an orange streak to it, stretching across close to the Zenith. There were a few last night seen by others, but I only saw one impressive one. 

 

I was good to get out for the fresh air with friends/like-minded people.

 

Thanks for reading, clear skies


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#6582 JHollJr

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Posted Today, 03:11 PM

Oct 20, 2018

 

With clear skies, 87.3% illuminated moon, and intermittent bouts of bad seeing and transparency, I decided to make the trip to the dark site with a friend.

 

I set up two refractors and had a look at anything I could think of, from 21:00 to 01:30, when the transparency took a dive for the worse. 

 

With my Starcannon, I had a look at:

 

Double cluster- stunning

M45 - nebulosity detected

M31 and M110- amazing at beginning of the night with 31N and 22N

M35- looked good up to 10D

M34

M27 - transparency wasnt the greatest, not as sharp

NGC457 - Owl cluster, looked great

M1- barely detectable with and without a UHC

M38- starfish cluster

M36

M37

 

With my Stardagger:

 

Spent a long time on the moon and showing others, who were very impressed with the views with and without the orange filter

M45 - very faint nebulosity detected

M35- faint but detectable

M38- starfish cluster

M36

M37

Vega, Capella, Algol

Hyades cluster

and Alpha Persei moving group

 

With my binoculars:

 

M45

Hyades

Alpha Persei moving group

Swept up MW around Cassiopeia

 

I also saw a meteor or a bolide break up upon entry into the atmosphere.  Had an orange streak to it, stretching across close to the Zenith. There were a few last night seen by others, but I only saw one impressive one. 

 

I was good to get out for the fresh air with friends/like-minded people.

 

Thanks for reading, clear skies

Dark skies with a 152mm must be spectacular. My guess with M1 is that the moon was messing with you. I’m planning a binocular session for this evening. The skies are clear, but the wind is up around 20 mph. Now that I think about it, I’m going out with the Questar, too; a decision just made, because I observe from my deck.


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#6583 NYJohn S

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Posted Today, 03:58 PM

Disregard my question on magnitude. Looked it up myself. My scope easily can view well beyond 7th magnitude. 

Hi Paul, As you figured out both Neptune and Uranus are visible from here with your scope. The way I usually confirm I'm on them is by carefully comparing the star field with what I see in sky safari. Then I go up in power enough to see them as a disc so I know it's not a nearby star. It helps if the seeing is good. If I can get a steady view at 200x around here I consider that good seeing. Usually calm nights without wind are the best for good seeing. Windy nights can blow the moisture out of the air and we may have excellent transparency but poor seeing. On nights like that without the moon I like to look for galaxies, nebula and other dso where transparency and a dark sky is more important than seeing.


Edited by NYJohn S, Today, 05:58 PM.

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#6584 Pbinder

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Posted Today, 04:07 PM

Hi Paul, As you figured out both Neptune and Uranus are visible from here with your scope. The way I usually confirm I'm on them is by carefully comparing the star field with what I see in sky safari. Then I go up in power enough to see them as a disc so  know it's not a nearby star. It helps if the seeing is good. If I can get a steady view at 200x around here I consider that good seeing. Usually calm nights without wind are the best for good seeing. Windy nights can blow the moisture out of the air and we may have excellent transparency but poor seeing. On nights like that without the moon I like to look for galaxies, nebula and other dso where transparency and a dark sky is more important than seeing.

Noted thank you! 


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#6585 Tyson M

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Posted Today, 04:28 PM

Dark skies with a 152mm must be spectacular. My guess with M1 is that the moon was messing with you. I’m planning a binocular session for this evening. The skies are clear, but the wind is up around 20 mph. Now that I think about it, I’m going out with the Questar, too; a decision just made, because I observe from my deck.

Yea it was fairly bright, lots of background light. The 22N was better in this scope on all targets for that reason, darkened things up. 


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#6586 NYJohn S

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Posted Today, 05:58 PM

Oct 20, 2018

 

With clear skies, 87.3% illuminated moon, and intermittent bouts of bad seeing and transparency, I decided to make the trip to the dark site with a friend.

 

I set up two refractors and had a look at anything I could think of, from 21:00 to 01:30, when the transparency took a dive for the worse. 

 

With my Starcannon, I had a look at:

 

Double cluster- stunning

M45 - nebulosity detected

M31 and M110- amazing at beginning of the night with 31N and 22N

M35- looked good up to 10D

M34

M27 - transparency wasnt the greatest, not as sharp

NGC457 - Owl cluster, looked great

M1- barely detectable with and without a UHC

M38- starfish cluster

M36

M37

 

With my Stardagger:

 

Spent a long time on the moon and showing others, who were very impressed with the views with and without the orange filter

M45 - very faint nebulosity detected

M35- faint but detectable

M38- starfish cluster

M36

M37

Vega, Capella, Algol

Hyades cluster

and Alpha Persei moving group

 

With my binoculars:

 

M45

Hyades

Alpha Persei moving group

Swept up MW around Cassiopeia

 

I also saw a meteor or a bolide break up upon entry into the atmosphere.  Had an orange streak to it, stretching across close to the Zenith. There were a few last night seen by others, but I only saw one impressive one. 

 

I was good to get out for the fresh air with friends/like-minded people.

 

Thanks for reading, clear skies

What a great session Tyson! I don't usually try for most of the things on your list with the moon but it sounds like the dark site made up for it. Very nice!


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