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Do I need a Tak Mewlon 210? Yes!

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#1 Scott in NC

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:19 PM

Okay, so no one actually *needs* a Tak Mewlon 210, especially someone who already owns more scopes than they know what to do with.  I'd actually end up selling a scope or two from my current arsenal if I bought this one, although I haven't decided which one yet.  My goal would be to have a relatively short, lightweight, portable scope for high-magnification lunar, planetary, and double star viewing, with more aperture than any of my 3-5" refractors.  I would plan to mount it on my DM6 & Berlebach Planet.

 

I've already chatted with one of you (dr.who) about this scope, but I'd like to hear from others who have experience with the Mewlon 210.  Any insights, whether positive or negative, will be greatly appreciated.  And while I'd love to try out one of these scopes, I'm also stalling for time, hoping that someone else will buy the one I've got my eye on.  That way I won't have to explain to my wife why I'm buying yet another scope! :lol:



#2 rmollise

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:34 PM

Depends on what you want to do with it. Can be a wonderful planetary scope, sure, or just something to show off,

For general use a Celestron Edge 800 is probably more practical. The difference in price will pay quite a few bar-tabs, too. :lol:


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#3 dr.who

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:38 PM


Scott-

Sitting on my hands... But if you pass on it I will be buying it... :lol:

#4 Scott in NC

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:42 PM

Depends on what you want to do with it. Can be a wonderful planetary scope, sure, or just something to show off,

For general use a Celestron Edge 800 is probably more practical. The difference in price will pay quite a few bar-tabs, too. :lol:

 

That's what I was wondering.  Will this give me anything that my Meade LX90 8" SCT isn't already giving me (other than a smaller bank account)?  My SCT actually has pretty decent optics, and unless it's really cold outside, doesn't have too horribly long of a cool-down period.  And it's the only scope I have with a highly-convenient alt-az go-to mount.  The downside is that I can't use it manually on my DM6 (and no, I'm not about to defork it).  If I didn't already have the LX90, this would be a no-brainer.  Hmm...



#5 Scott in NC

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:42 PM

Scott-

Sitting on my hands... But if you pass on it I will be buying it... :lol:

 

If you'd just buy it, then I could stop looking at that ad 10 times a day. :lol:



#6 The Ardent

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:57 PM

Scott

if you come to SR, and Mr Catapoman attends, yaw'l need to talk. He had a 210 for a number of years. Fantastic views and no corrector to dew up. But the FOV is small....



#7 Kunama

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:58 PM

Yes, everyone needs a Mewlon 210  but it needs to be allowed to cool well to get the best out of it.  The baffle holds quite a bit of heat, remove the diagonal and dew cap and point it upwards for an hour and you will be rewarded with very nice views.  Excellent on planets.....

 

 



#8 The Ardent

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 04:09 PM

Before buying another scope, try binoviewing the planets or moon first. You'll be surprised at how well even a 3" scope will work on planets with 2 eyes. 

 

My 3" refactor monoviewing Jupiter  :vomit:

Same scope binoviewing  :waytogo:

 

Okay, so no one actually *needs* a Tak Mewlon 210, especially someone who already owns more scopes than they know what to do with.  I'd actually end up selling a scope or two from my current arsenal if I bought this one, although I haven't decided which one yet.  My goal would be to have a relatively short, lightweight, portable scope for high-magnification lunar, planetary, and double star viewing, with more aperture than any of my 3-5" refractors.  I would plan to mount it on my DM6 & Berlebach Planet.

 

I've already chatted with one of you (dr.who) about this scope, but I'd like to hear from others who have experience with the Mewlon 210.  Any insights, whether positive or negative, will be greatly appreciated.  And while I'd love to try out one of these scopes, I'm also stalling for time, hoping that someone else will buy the one I've got my eye on.  That way I won't have to explain to my wife why I'm buying yet another scope! :lol:

 



#9 Scott in NC

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 04:31 PM

Ray, I just sold a great pair of Denk Standards with Powerswitch and D21s last week.  No matter how good I find the views, I just haven't ever been happy with what I call the futz-factor of binoviewers.  Yeah, the views really are good through BVs, but when I view through a single Nagler, Ethos, or ES100, the gear just simply gets out of the way and allows me to enjoy a more comfortable viewing experience.


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#10 rolo

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 07:33 PM

Okay, so no one actually *needs* a Tak Mewlon 210, especially someone who already owns more scopes than they know what to do with.  I'd actually end up selling a scope or two from my current arsenal if I bought this one, although I haven't decided which one yet.  My goal would be to have a relatively short, lightweight, portable scope for high-magnification lunar, planetary, and double star viewing, with more aperture than any of my 3-5" refractors.  I would plan to mount it on my DM6 & Berlebach Planet.

 

I've already chatted with one of you (dr.who) about this scope, but I'd like to hear from others who have experience with the Mewlon 210.  Any insights, whether positive or negative, will be greatly appreciated.  And while I'd love to try out one of these scopes, I'm also stalling for time, hoping that someone else will buy the one I've got my eye on.  That way I won't have to explain to my wife why I'm buying yet another scope! :lol:

I have M250 and I did use an M210 for a while. While it won't show you anymore than a good 8" SCT the views will be of better quality. Celestron and Meade can only dream of making an optic of such quality. That being said, its not a night & day difference at the eyepiece either. In the M210 you'll have better contrast and slightly sharper at high power. Its open in the front so cool down is not a big problem. Collimation can be tricky but will hold once dialed in. tTe biggest difference I found in the star test vs an excellent C8 was the smoothness of the M210 optics and the lack of spherical aberration. Considerably less light scatter makes the M210 a excellent planetary scope. Get the darn thing, you've got nothing to lose.



#11 Scott in NC

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 08:34 PM

Collimation can be tricky but will hold once dialed in.


Thanks for the input. Could you expand upon this part a little? In what way is collimation more difficult than for an SCT? I had assumed that the primary orientation was fixed, and collimation just involved tweaking the axial alignment of the secondary. Or is it that the spider vanes add 4 more potential directions of misalignment?



#12 Kunama

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 09:35 PM

My M210 had more frequent flyer miles than Richard Branson but still held its collimation perfectly.  

 

A great scope!



#13 Scott in NC

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 09:46 PM

Thanks for the input, Matt.  On those rare occasions when you needed to collimate it, do you recall finding it difficult?



#14 dr.who

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 10:47 PM

Depends on what you want to do with it. Can be a wonderful planetary scope, sure, or just something to show off,
For general use a Celestron Edge 800 is probably more practical. The difference in price will pay quite a few bar-tabs, too. :lol:

 
That's what I was wondering.  Will this give me anything that my Meade LX90 8" SCT isn't already giving me (other than a smaller bank account)?  My SCT actually has pretty decent optics, and unless it's really cold outside, doesn't have too horribly long of a cool-down period.  And it's the only scope I have with a highly-convenient alt-az go-to mount.  The downside is that I can't use it manually on my DM6 (and no, I'm not about to defork it).  If I didn't already have the LX90, this would be a no-brainer.  Hmm...


Still sitting on my hands... Still sitting on my hands... Still sitting on my hands... Oh Bloody Hell! I have to chime in! ;)

I had a very good LX90 too. What killed it for me was the overall weight of the forks plus the tube. I loved the scope but it was a hassle to observe with and I was always afraid I was going to trip and drop it or pull a muscle lifting it around. And I am a big guy. It's the same reason I don't like the CPC's.

This scope will punch above it's class due to the longer focal length. It's only an 8 1/4" but visually it performs like a 9 1/4" or even a 10" SCT.

And is going to be better than the LX90, even a good one. It's the difference between a mass produced scope and one where only about 40 are made per year. This number comes from Chris at OPT. I asked and he said they only made about 40 a year, between 18-20 of which came to the US and the rest to Europe and Asia.

#15 dr.who

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 10:48 PM

Scott-

Sitting on my hands... But if you pass on it I will be buying it... :lol:

 
If you'd just buy it, then I could stop looking at that ad 10 times a day. :lol:


All you have to do is say that you don't want it and then I will engage. :lol: Until you do it's yours. I don't like to poach on a friend's turf.

#16 dr.who

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 10:51 PM

Yes, everyone needs a Mewlon 210  but it needs to be allowed to cool well to get the best out of it.  The baffle holds quite a bit of heat, remove the diagonal and dew cap and point it upwards for an hour and you will be rewarded with very nice views.  Excellent on planets.....


Or use a small fan to blow air in like Daniel M. does. It cools quick. I don't do that and I get no seagull or wooly stars after about 15-20 minutes. After about 30 I get pinpoint ones close to what I get in my refractors. This is without active cooling. With active cooling (a fan) I can cut that time by 1/3. This is why I always had and swear by the TEMPest fans on my Edges. I can't stand seagull and wooly stars which is why I am a big refractor head.

#17 dr.who

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 10:53 PM

Collimation can be tricky but will hold once dialed in.


Thanks for the input. Could you expand upon this part a little? In what way is collimation more difficult than for an SCT? I had assumed that the primary orientation was fixed, and collimation just involved tweaking the axial alignment of the secondary. Or is it that the spider vanes add 4 more potential directions of misalignment?


My guess is he is talking about the screws being very tight and somewhat difficult to work with vs. the standard SCT. Whatever you do don't put Bob's Knobs on it. That just makes it worse.

#18 Alvin See

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 11:02 PM

I was extremely happy with my Mewlon 210.

 

About collimation, I have always managed to nailed it on a tracking mount. Once collimated, it usually holds very well. But there was one collimation ordeal that I will never forget: http://www.cloudynig...-sides-unequal/

Even the guy who is now putting the Mewlon 210 on sale has never experienced this problem. But if it happens to you, I will know how to fix it.

 

I'll let the pictures do the speaking:

 

11909656_10153479778666280_35141567_n_zp

11868683_10153479778686280_207660121_n_z


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#19 Kunama

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 11:38 PM

Thanks for the input, Matt.  On those rare occasions when you needed to collimate it, do you recall finding it difficult?

I really only had to tweak it once and even then about 1/8 of a turn on one screw.  After that it never moved.

Of all the Tak scopes I have owned, the M210 and TSA120 are the ones I should have kept for visual astro.


Edited by Kunama, 16 September 2015 - 11:44 PM.

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#20 Alvin See

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 12:00 AM

Also to say something about its performance on planets. It gave me the best view I have seen of Jupiter. It was an immediate WOW and felt absolutely contented about my choice of telescope. I have once looked at Jupiter through a C11 and I didn't remember the WOW factor.

 

It has plenty of backfocus, allowing me to binoview as I like. As you can see in the picture, it can even take a 2 inch diagonal + power and filter switch (modified to shorten light path) + a Pentax XW30 - and comes to focus in all power modes. You can also add a Moonlite focuser (which I did), which is not terribly expensive.  


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#21 rolo

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 02:30 AM

 

Collimation can be tricky but will hold once dialed in.


Thanks for the input. Could you expand upon this part a little? In what way is collimation more difficult than for an SCT? I had assumed that the primary orientation was fixed, and collimation just involved tweaking the axial alignment of the secondary. Or is it that the spider vanes add 4 more potential directions of misalignment?

 

Correct the spider vane screws  could be used as a slight push pull adjustment to center the secondary. I use the Tak collimating scope for this procedure. I believe the secondary is spherical so it wouldn't matter much but it did bother me.



#22 Scott in NC

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 07:14 AM

Thanks, guys!  Alvin, your pictures are making this decision even more difficult, although the possibility of significant collimation issues is scaring me off a little.  But I guess that's possible with any scope, even with one of my beloved refractors.



#23 Bill Barlow

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 08:48 AM

Is there any way to remove the straight through finder that comes with the M210 and replace it with a RACI 9x50, say a SV model?  This has been a big reason why I have very little interest in this scope as it seems the finder bracket is welded onto the OTA with no way to remove it and replace the finder.  I can't stand using a straight-through finder on an altaz mount.

 

Scott, not sure this Mewlon would give you any better views than your FS 128 on planets, but maybe a bit better on deep sky targets?

 

Bill


Edited by Bill Barlow, 17 September 2015 - 08:50 AM.


#24 Alvin See

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 09:08 AM

I have not tried removing the finder - I don't think you should since it also acts as a holder - but I love straight through anyway. Though I would have wished for a 60mm finder since I'm bad at star hopping.

Except for that one occasion, collimation has always been easy, not much more difficult than collimating a standard SCT. But please use a tracking mount when collimating. This thing is a planet and globular killer. The only object I find disappointing in the Mewlon 210 is super wide DSOs, like the Veil, which is almost invisible due to the inability to go lower power. The Orion Nebula still looks great it it at lowest power possible.

 

Now I shall show you more pictures :)

 

11897105_10153479778901280_1348631789_n_

11258594_10153254394886280_290300187_n_z

10888199_10153018133996280_1823078190_n_

10799741_10152810014686280_14531448_n_zp

Capture11_2_20152_14_51AM_zps10ff4fc2.jp 


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#25 Alvin See

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 09:09 AM

Scott, if you have any question about it, ask away!




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