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#3726 vballrican

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Posted 17 March 2019 - 10:13 AM

Hello everyone. JC here from sunny Sarasota, Fl. Just wanted to say HI. i'm new to AP and astronomy in general. Happy to be here and see all the great help and advice you guys and girls offer! Thanks. 



#3727 Hotsulphurnick

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Posted 17 March 2019 - 10:23 AM

Hello CN members my name is Nick. Super noob here with very little knowledge of the sky. My girlfriend saw the excitement in my eyes last summer when a coworker/buddy of mine brought another buddy and myself out to a dark site with his 14" Skywatcher dob. He is a very active member of CN and knows his way around the sky. He showed us the Ring Nebula, some globular clusters, and other objects that I don't have the skill to remember the names of. But when I saw Saturn and it's rings for the first time at the age of 34, wow, blew me away. And the thought of looking light years in the past at the other objects blew me away as well. The size of his scope was the first, "WOW" out of my mouth though.

Well, my girlfriend stole this buddy's phone number out of my phone and texted him asking what scope she should buy me for my birthday (Yes, she's the one). Extremely exited to help, he recommended his first scope. I came home after work on Feb. 28, 2019 and opened 2 large boxes containing an Orion XT8 dob and it's base. My face lit up with joy.

As I soon found out from my buddy, CN posts, and first hand, the skies would turn cloudy for 2 weeks after opening my gift (sorry to all of those in Colorado affected by her purchase). Well, I used that time to by a couple ES 82 EPs on the CN classifieds (I know, probably too soon for a noob with such limited knowledge/experience). Also bought a Chesire which I'm struggling with but that's for another forum and I did get it collimated pretty well with just the cap.

Anyway, I've peeked at the moon a few times as it has been out. Mars was a red dot right next to the first quarter moon. Tried to locate a couple DSOs but I think the moon and my neighbor's street light has affected my view. Saw Orion Nebula of course and that was pretty awesome to stare at (every night it's clear enough). The whole Orion constellation is pretty sweet. I also saw the Ring Nebula which was cool and may have seen the Great Cluster of Hercules but not certain. Looked like a cloud, and I was expecting a group of clear bright stars. My buddy reccomended I try to find M81 and M82 but that endeavor has lacked success. I plan to get to the dark site I went to with my buddy soon, but I live in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado at 8000 feet (dark and dry!) and there is still 3 feet of snow up at that spot (it's 5 minutes down the road though!)The past couple of mornings I have gotten up at 4 a.m. to acclimate my scope (see I've learned a little so far), and to view Saturn and Jupiter. It was as spectacular as I remember!!! (except it wasn't -20, yes that's 20 below 0, last summer). Venus poked her head up too but I've also learned that viewing low on the horizon is a no go. Saturn's rings were clear as day even with some moisture in the air and saw some nice bands in Jupiter. It was pretty sweet to see Lo come around from behind Jupiter from one day to the next (I've read about how Jupiter can be more spectacular than Saturn because the view is ever changing and I'm starting to see why).

I'll be sure to visit some forums about what DSOs to try to locate as a total rookie, how to find them and how to just learn the sky in general. I can't get Starry Night to load on my girlfriends older laptop, which sucks, but I do have Stelarium app and that is nice.

Anyway, thanks for reading my crazy long intro but I'm pretty stoked about this new hobby. I am notorious for starting something and not finishing it though so hopefully my XT8 stays in the living room and out of the closet for a long time. I think it should. If not, I guess I can recycle those ES 82s (and I'll be looking for more) on the classifieds for just a small loss. Thanks all, I look forward to hearing from you on some other forums.
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#3728 aeajr

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Posted 17 March 2019 - 10:26 AM

Welcome to all of our new members.    Be sure to take a look at the tips posted at this link.

https://www.cloudyni...32#entry9140132



#3729 TieDyeAstronomer

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 01:38 AM

Hello CN members my name is Nick. Super noob here with very little knowledge of the sky. My girlfriend saw the excitement in my eyes last summer when a coworker/buddy of mine brought another buddy and myself out to a dark site with his 14" Skywatcher dob. He is a very active member of CN and knows his way around the sky. He showed us the Ring Nebula, some globular clusters, and other objects that I don't have the skill to remember the names of. But when I saw Saturn and it's rings for the first time at the age of 34, wow, blew me away. And the thought of looking light years in the past at the other objects blew me away as well. The size of his scope was the first, "WOW" out of my mouth though.

Well, my girlfriend stole this buddy's phone number out of my phone and texted him asking what scope she should buy me for my birthday (Yes, she's the one). Extremely exited to help, he recommended his first scope. I came home after work on Feb. 28, 2019 and opened 2 large boxes containing an Orion XT8 dob and it's base. My face lit up with joy.

As I soon found out from my buddy, CN posts, and first hand, the skies would turn cloudy for 2 weeks after opening my gift (sorry to all of those in Colorado affected by her purchase). Well, I used that time to by a couple ES 82 EPs on the CN classifieds (I know, probably too soon for a noob with such limited knowledge/experience). Also bought a Chesire which I'm struggling with but that's for another forum and I did get it collimated pretty well with just the cap.

Anyway, I've peeked at the moon a few times as it has been out. Mars was a red dot right next to the first quarter moon. Tried to locate a couple DSOs but I think the moon and my neighbor's street light has affected my view. Saw Orion Nebula of course and that was pretty awesome to stare at (every night it's clear enough). The whole Orion constellation is pretty sweet. I also saw the Ring Nebula which was cool and may have seen the Great Cluster of Hercules but not certain. Looked like a cloud, and I was expecting a group of clear bright stars. My buddy reccomended I try to find M81 and M82 but that endeavor has lacked success. I plan to get to the dark site I went to with my buddy soon, but I live in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado at 8000 feet (dark and dry!) and there is still 3 feet of snow up at that spot (it's 5 minutes down the road though!)The past couple of mornings I have gotten up at 4 a.m. to acclimate my scope (see I've learned a little so far), and to view Saturn and Jupiter. It was as spectacular as I remember!!! (except it wasn't -20, yes that's 20 below 0, last summer). Venus poked her head up too but I've also learned that viewing low on the horizon is a no go. Saturn's rings were clear as day even with some moisture in the air and saw some nice bands in Jupiter. It was pretty sweet to see Lo come around from behind Jupiter from one day to the next (I've read about how Jupiter can be more spectacular than Saturn because the view is ever changing and I'm starting to see why).

I'll be sure to visit some forums about what DSOs to try to locate as a total rookie, how to find them and how to just learn the sky in general. I can't get Starry Night to load on my girlfriends older laptop, which sucks, but I do have Stelarium app and that is nice.

Anyway, thanks for reading my crazy long intro but I'm pretty stoked about this new hobby. I am notorious for starting something and not finishing it though so hopefully my XT8 stays in the living room and out of the closet for a long time. I think it should. If not, I guess I can recycle those ES 82s (and I'll be looking for more) on the classifieds for just a small loss. Thanks all, I look forward to hearing from you on some other forums.

Welcome, Nick! Your enthusiasm is contagious, and I wish you the best of luck as you explore this great hobby of ours. If you come up with any questions, don't hesitate to ask. I or anyone else here will be more than happy to help!

"The whole Orion constellation is pretty sweet." Yes, it is! It's certainly the highlight of the winter sky. The amount of treasures within his boundaries are too many to list here, but there are a couple which are less obvious that I'll let you in on. For one, up in the club/arrows area to the northeast of Betelgeuse, NGC 2169 is a small but very interesting little open star cluster. A little farther north, NGC 2174 (the Monkeyhead Nebula) is a neat object in my opinion, but you should definitely wait for a time when the moon is not up before you go looking for it. It's a very faint nebula, much fainter than the Orion Nebula and more comparable in brightness to the Flame nebula (another good target for dark skies, right by the easternmost belt star of Orion and the Horsehead nebula). The Monkeyhead Nebula is big, so use your lowest power eyepiece. My best view yet was had at 27x. (That said, there's always a lot of variables that go into how an object looks in the eyepiece, so never be afraid to experiment to find the right magnification for you!) As a bonus, the little obscure star cluster Pismis 27 is right on the edge of the nebula.

Since you've collimated your telescope, you might also try taking a peek at Sirius at high magnification. (It'll be eye-searing!) Sirius has a white dwarf companion, which is 8731x fainter than Sirius itself. It's also only a few arcseconds away, making it a challenge to see next to the brilliant glare of Sirius! However, the stars orbit each other quickly enough that their separation changes significantly over the course of a human lifespan. 25 years back, it used to take a large telescope, excellent conditions, and a good observer to be able to see Sirius B. Nowadays the two are headed towards maximum separation in their orbit, so it's a lot easier and this is a good time to check it out. I've been able to see Sirius B pretty much every time I've looked this winter in my Orion XT8, even when the seeing wasn't great. You'll probably have to look "through" some spikes and stuff coming off of Sirius for the little faintish dot. When you see it, you'll know!

Let us know if you have any questions!

Good luck and Clear Skies!



#3730 konrad

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:34 AM

Welcome to CN JC, Nick enjoy the forums



#3731 brybell

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 02:37 PM

Hello! Newbie here, I just purchased an Apertura AD8 from High Point with Barlow lens, as well as a 6mm and 20mm gold line (SVBONY) EP's from Amazon. Excited to receive everything! I live in Northern California.



#3732 brybell

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 03:00 PM

Hello CN members my name is Nick. Super noob here with very little knowledge of the sky. My girlfriend saw the excitement in my eyes last summer when a coworker/buddy of mine brought another buddy and myself out to a dark site with his 14" Skywatcher dob. He is a very active member of CN and knows his way around the sky. He showed us the Ring Nebula, some globular clusters, and other objects that I don't have the skill to remember the names of. But when I saw Saturn and it's rings for the first time at the age of 34, wow, blew me away. And the thought of looking light years in the past at the other objects blew me away as well. The size of his scope was the first, "WOW" out of my mouth though.

Well, my girlfriend stole this buddy's phone number out of my phone and texted him asking what scope she should buy me for my birthday (Yes, she's the one). Extremely exited to help, he recommended his first scope. I came home after work on Feb. 28, 2019 and opened 2 large boxes containing an Orion XT8 dob and it's base. My face lit up with joy.

As I soon found out from my buddy, CN posts, and first hand, the skies would turn cloudy for 2 weeks after opening my gift (sorry to all of those in Colorado affected by her purchase). Well, I used that time to by a couple ES 82 EPs on the CN classifieds (I know, probably too soon for a noob with such limited knowledge/experience). Also bought a Chesire which I'm struggling with but that's for another forum and I did get it collimated pretty well with just the cap.

Anyway, I've peeked at the moon a few times as it has been out. Mars was a red dot right next to the first quarter moon. Tried to locate a couple DSOs but I think the moon and my neighbor's street light has affected my view. Saw Orion Nebula of course and that was pretty awesome to stare at (every night it's clear enough). The whole Orion constellation is pretty sweet. I also saw the Ring Nebula which was cool and may have seen the Great Cluster of Hercules but not certain. Looked like a cloud, and I was expecting a group of clear bright stars. My buddy reccomended I try to find M81 and M82 but that endeavor has lacked success. I plan to get to the dark site I went to with my buddy soon, but I live in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado at 8000 feet (dark and dry!) and there is still 3 feet of snow up at that spot (it's 5 minutes down the road though!)The past couple of mornings I have gotten up at 4 a.m. to acclimate my scope (see I've learned a little so far), and to view Saturn and Jupiter. It was as spectacular as I remember!!! (except it wasn't -20, yes that's 20 below 0, last summer). Venus poked her head up too but I've also learned that viewing low on the horizon is a no go. Saturn's rings were clear as day even with some moisture in the air and saw some nice bands in Jupiter. It was pretty sweet to see Lo come around from behind Jupiter from one day to the next (I've read about how Jupiter can be more spectacular than Saturn because the view is ever changing and I'm starting to see why).

I'll be sure to visit some forums about what DSOs to try to locate as a total rookie, how to find them and how to just learn the sky in general. I can't get Starry Night to load on my girlfriends older laptop, which sucks, but I do have Stelarium app and that is nice.

Anyway, thanks for reading my crazy long intro but I'm pretty stoked about this new hobby. I am notorious for starting something and not finishing it though so hopefully my XT8 stays in the living room and out of the closet for a long time. I think it should. If not, I guess I can recycle those ES 82s (and I'll be looking for more) on the classifieds for just a small loss. Thanks all, I look forward to hearing from you on some other forums.

How did you get on the classifieds? It says I need 30 posts.



#3733 trurl

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 04:01 PM

How did you get on the classifieds? It says I need 30 posts.

I thought that restriction only applied to posting on the classifieds. In any case, it is very easy to get to 30 posts. Just go play one of the Off Topic Observatory Games.

 

https://www.cloudyni...ervatory-games/



#3734 brybell

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 05:11 PM

I thought that restriction only applied to posting on the classifieds. In any case, it is very easy to get to 30 posts. Just go play one of the Off Topic Observatory Games.

 

https://www.cloudyni...ervatory-games/

When I go to the "Swap & Shop" it shows nothing for me.



#3735 SleepyGuy

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 07:44 PM

Hello to all the sleepless stargazers,I have chosen to join the ranks of the bleary eyed.I was able to finally pick up an old Meade Starfinder 8" at a reasonable price.So let the bug begin!

I drive a truck for my dinner so see lots of clear nights,even though the pounding may make for a small adventure with the telescope.We will just have to see how bad this bug bites.Wish me luck.

Jack

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#3736 Greyhaven

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 06:16 AM

Good Luck!  Looks like your finder is installed backwards.

Grey


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#3737 konrad

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 07:34 AM

Welcome to CN  Jack enjoy your nice 8 inch scope


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#3738 SleepyGuy

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:48 PM

Good Luck!  Looks like your finder is installed backwards.

Grey

Doh!



#3739 maknswarf

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 11:38 PM

Edit: on recommendation from another user I just bought a Meade Infinity 102mm specifically for its mobility and will not take up the room in my small apartment. Cant wait for clear skies!😁

Hello everyone! My name is Jay and a newb, I have been stargazing since I was a kid, but recently decided to buy a scope. However my head has been spinning with trying to decipher astronomer language. I do feel like I'm starting to understand some things😁sorry if I'm asking stupid questions though.

I've done some research and think I would like to get the Orion XT6 or something similar. I'm interested in viewing pretty much everything, but I've read that you need different eyepieces for this. Which eyepieces should I look at getting? Also read something about Barlow lenses, how do these work?

As far as the visuals, how much difference is there between what you actually see and the photos I've seen. For example what would Orion's nebula look like through this scope? What filters would help bring out the colors?

As for transportation and storing do you guys use cases and what cases do you recommend if you do?

As for astrophotography, I'm not planning on jumping on this right away, but how much stuff do you really need for this? The pictures I've seen of some of your guys rigs, while REALLY cool looking it looks incredibly complicated not to mention the post-processing software. However, the end result pics are BEAUTIFUL like I want to put it on my wall beautiful😊 Would I be able to just get a DSLR and just start taking pics or do I need more in depth knowledge?

Thanks again and I can't wait to get deeper into this wonderful hobby.

Edited by maknswarf, 21 March 2019 - 01:29 AM.

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#3740 SeaBee1

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 08:22 AM

Welcome Jay!

 

As this thread is for intros only, questions typically can't be addressed here, it would just clog up the works badly. We love questions, and if you post in the appropriate forum, you will get more and better response.

 

Enjoy your stay, and looking forward to your posts!

 

CB



#3741 dakinemaui

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 09:52 AM

Wanted to throw out a big howzit from a new member! Between scopes at the moment, though a fair bit of meter-class experience via work. I'm looking forward to the challenges of planetary/lunar imaging on 20x smaller apertures on a more "constrained" budget. wink.gif



#3742 Colie75

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 11:32 AM

Greetings Cloudy Nights,

 

My name is Chris  I'm a new member to CL.  And although I've been stargazing for nearly three decades. I would consider my experience level into this hobby as a beginner.  I have owned several telescopes over the years ranging from the cheapest which I purchased from Walmart to most advanced SCT's.  My very first high quality telescope was a Meade 10" LX200. Which took me all Summer of 1995 to save up for.  Unfortunately due to the weight of the 10" OTA my usage of it got less and less..

 

Because of that my grand plan was to build an observatory on the property to permanently  house the LX200.  But at the time options were limited and never got around to it.   After selling the LX200 in 2003 to place a down payment on a car. I sort of became inactive in the hobby. Until I purchased my Meade 8" LX90 GPS in 2013. Which I ended up selling a year later with the intentions of getting an 8" LS.  I wanted something that I could easily take outside and flip a switch and done.. Mainly because my setup time when I got home from work was very limited.. Most of the time it was already dark when I got home. 

 

Unfortunately my plan to get the 8" LS didn't happen right away. Work got real busy and I ended up putting in lots of overtime.. Anyways I recently purchased that 8" LS a little over a month ago. Which ended up having some issues and needed to go back to Meade's factory in Mexico for some warranty work. I also just purchased a 12" LX200 and a SkyShed POD from the CL Classified to house it in..  Skies the limit.. 

 

Anyways I just wanted to say Hi and introduce myself. And I am very excited to be here.. I have also gotten lots of great advice just by lurking around the boards..  

And I can't wait to engage in some of the topics.. 

 

 

 

Clear Skies everyone

Chris


Edited by Colie75, 21 March 2019 - 11:39 AM.


#3743 scubaduderon

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 03:51 PM

Hi, Ron here from Momence Il.

 

I'm not exactly new to astronomy, having owned a 12.5" dob about 23 years ago, but have been out for about 20 years. I recenty picked up a StellarVue 80mm/D9 with an old Vixen GP mount with dual axis drives. I'm in the process of repairing the DD-1 controller, bringing the drive voltage down to a regulated 9v from the 12v the controller puts out while slewing at 32x. This is the first Equatorial mount I have owned, so I'm quite excited for the chips I need to come in from China!

 

I also used to throw  a Perseids party on my folks farm for 30+ years. 

 

At any rate thanks for the help I know I'm gonna get. I've read some of the board and I know you are a super group!

 

Best, Ron 

 

 


Edited by scubaduderon, 21 March 2019 - 03:53 PM.


#3744 CoMittWest

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 08:51 PM

Hello.....again !!! CoMittWest here, I feel I need to re-introduce myself, I've been away from this forum for what seems like the entire winter ! Not my intention but as we all know, life gets in the way at times.

Anyway, I am back amongst the living, more or less. Had a bout of shingles that kept me down for over 2 months. I am now a very forthright advocate for the vaccine for this particular nasty

little bug. Suffice to say this was some of the worst pain I have ever experienced and I have scars that, I am told, will be with me the rest of my life ! So, as you are able, get the vaccine,

it's a 2 shot process and feels like a kick from a mule, but believe me, you don't want shingles !!! Looking forward now to getting out with the scope and getting back into the wonder of this

hobby that gives so much to all of us. Glad to back !!! smile.gif flowerred.gif waytogo.gif


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#3745 jpcampbell

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Posted Yesterday, 01:02 AM

Hello! John C. from Montreal here, a city that is apparently one of the most light polluted environments in North America. While I've had a life-long interest in astronomy, I only began to take on observing as a hobby in late January. The light-pollution challenge definitely deterred me from ever making an effort over the course of 30 years. It always seemed an impossible challenge, but this winter I took the plunge for the first time. It was 45 years in the making (I'm 53).  I bought 10x50 binoculars and The Cambridge Star Atlas and would go out on clear nights when it wasn't too cold - not below -15C (5 F). A few weeks after I got the bins, I picked up the Lightbridge Mini 114 (my first time ever looking through a telescope). That scope is pretty good for what it is, and I've learned a lot using it these past few weeks, but 4.5 inches is just not enough for these light-polluted skies. 

 

My "observatory" is a second floor city balcony facing an alley and a three story building. That building and the balconies in the building next to mine aren't aren't too problematic, with only the occasional bedroom light to deal with. What's a little more problematic is a powerful light in the alley located outside my field of view, but has a powerful glow. The balcony is a relatively large, L shaped balcony, but observing can really only happen at the bottom of the L, which is 6' deep and faces SW. The sky above the building in front of me is all I got! This means my whole plan as far as city observing is to get to know whatever slice of sky is there. Orion has  been perfectly in view these past few weeks.

 

A couple of weeks ago I decided I had the budget and would get the Skywatcher 8" Dob, which I figure could still be useful on the balcony, even if it might be a tight squeeze. I was going to buy it this weekend locally, but an ad on Kijiji for a one year old Nexstar 6SE caught my eye, though the seller's initial price of $800 (CAD) was beyond what I was willing to pay. In the end, I managed to get the 6SE for $640 and the amazing thing is it has never been used! Assembled twice, but has never seen "first light". Seller bought it for his young son who has no interest and, apparently, neither did the seller. Bought it today and it's in pristine condition and really is brand new. Of course, no chance I could use it this evening - it's raining here. When I got the Lightbridge Mini, it was snowing. 

 

I want to thank all the contributors here over the years. I've only been here a few weeks, but have browsed and searched through this forum and it really is a fantastic resource. I've learned a lot from so many here.




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