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NVD Micro - green or white phosphor

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#1 eastwd

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 01:39 PM

I've read several threads about using night vision scopes like the NVD Micro for astronomy.  Eddgie's posts about how much he and friends have enjoyed low power scanning with his NVD Micro over the last 6 months have really impressed me.  I love the idea of being able to get wide-angle, "live" views of a whole new class of extended objects like the Heart and Soul nebulae, Barnard's loop, etc., and the prospect of (carefully) passing the unit around at outreach events I host.  I've also read cnoct's excellent posts and enjoyed his terrific videos of imaging he's done using night vision on YouTube.  So I'm thinking about jumping in, and I'd appreciate some advice.  Honestly, I prefer the look produced by white phosphor tubes over the green views most night vision scopes deliver. But my preference for the aesthetics of white over green is not so strong that I want to sacrifice too much in the way of lost sensitivity, additional noise, etc.  I really like the look of the white phosphor images and videos jdbastro has posted, particularly this video he took at 1x with an H-alpha filter showing areas in and around Orion, Monoceros, and Taurus:https://vimeo.com/148837447, including the Rosette Nebula, the NGC 2023 & Horsehead Nebula area, and the nebula around Lambda Orionis ("Meissa Ring").  But I'm not sure what night vision equipment he's using (he describes it as a "Gen 3 unfilmed white phosphor image intensifier"), or how his images will compare to what you'd see with a white phosphor NVD Micro operating at similar (1x) magnification with an H-alpha filter under similar skies.      

 

If I pull the trigger on an NVD Micro, my plan would be to use this mainly for handheld viewing in 1x and similar (maybe 3x) low power modes, but also occasionally as an electronic eyepiece in my refractors.  At some point, I'll probably try taking some photos with my modded Canon 6D, but I expect that'll only be a once in awhile thing.  And I'd use it sometimes for terrestrial scanning at night try to see what the dogs are barking at.  My main observing site is an a semi-rural area in an orange zone with most of the light pollution confined to the northern horizon, and with skies that can regularly get as good as Bortle 4, mag 6.  Every once in a while, I get to travel to dark sky sites, including international dark sky parks.

 

As of today, the difference in price on Night Vision Depot's website between the highest performing white phosphor NVD Micro they list (Part number NVD-MICRO-WHP) and the highest performing green NVD Micro they carry (Part number NVD-MICRO-ULT) is less than $200.  So price isn't going to be the deciding issue.  In the specs shown on their website, the only differences I can see are that the green ULT tube has a signal to noise ratio of "30.0 min.," and a "photocathode response" of "2400 min."  By contrast, the white phosphor WHP unit has a signal to noise ratio of "25.0 min.," and a "photocathode response" of "2200 min."  Both are listed as having identical resolutions ("64 lp/mm min.").  As a noob, I have no idea what these differences will mean out under the night sky.  If I knew the white phosphor WHP NVD Micro unit with an H-a filter would yield views that approach what you see in jdbastro's video above under similar skies, then it would be a no-brainer -- I'd go for the WHP white phosphor unit. 

 

Any insights from you veterans will be greatly appreciated!  Thanks.

 

Larry


Edited by eastwd, 29 December 2015 - 01:45 PM.

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#2 REC

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 01:44 PM

I've read several threads about using night vision scopes like the NVD Micro for astronomy.  Eddgie's posts about how much he and friends have enjoyed low power scanning with his NVD Micro over the last 6 months have really impressed me.  I love the idea of being able to get wide-angle, "live" views of a whole new class of extended objects like the Heart and Soul nebulae, Barnard's loop, etc., and the prospect of (carefully) passing the unit around at outreach events I host.  I've also read cnoct's excellent posts and enjoyed his terrific videos of imaging he's done using night vision on YouTube.  So I'm thinking about jumping in, and I'd appreciate some advice.  Honestly, I prefer the look produced by white phosphor tubes over the green views most night vision scopes deliver. But my preference for the aesthetics of white over green is not so strong that I want to sacrifice too much in the way of lost sensitivity, additional noise, etc.  I really like the look of the white phosphor images and videos jdbastro has posted, particularly this video he took at 1x with an H-alpha filter showing areas in and around Orion, Monoceros, and Taurus: https://vimeo.com/148837447, including the Rosette Nebula, the NGC 2023 & Horsehead Nebula area, and the nebula around Lambda Orionis ("Meissa Ring").  But I'm not sure what night vision equipment he's using (he describes it as a "Gen 3 unfilmed white phosphor image intensifier"), or how his images will compare to what you'd see with a white phosphor NVD Micro operating at similar (1x) magnification with an H-alpha filter under similar skies.      

 

If I pull the trigger on an NVD Micro, my plan would be to use this mainly for handheld viewing in 1x and similar (maybe 3x) low power modes, but also occasionally as an electronic eyepiece in my refractors.  At some point, I'll probably try taking some photos with my modded Canon 6D, but I expect that'll only be a once in awhile thing.  And I'd use it sometimes for terrestrial scanning at night try to see what the dogs are barking at.  My main observing site is an a semi-rural area in an orange zone with most of the light pollution confined to the northern horizon, and with skies that can regularly get as good as Bortle 4, mag 6.  Every once in a while, I get to travel to dark sky sites, including international dark sky parks.

 

As of today, the difference in price on Night Vision Depot's website between the highest performing white phosphor NVD Micro they list (Part number NVD-MICRO-WHP) and the highest performing green NVD Micro they carry (Part number NVD-MICRO-ULT) is less than $200.  So price isn't going to be the deciding issue.  In the specs shown on their website, the only differences I can see are that the green ULT tube has a signal to noise ratio of "30.0 min.," and a "photocathode response" of "2400 min."  By contrast, the white phosphor WHP unit has a signal to noise ratio of "25.0 min.," and a "photocathode response" of "2200 min."  Both are listed as having identical resolutions ("64 lp/mm min.").  As a noob, I have no idea what these differences will mean out under the night sky.  If I knew the white phosphor WHP NVD Micro unit with an H-a filter would yield views that approach what you see in jdbastro's video above under similar skies, then it would be a no-brainer -- I'd go for the WHP white phosphor unit. 

 

Any insights from you veterans will be greatly appreciated!  Thanks.

 

Larry

I just tried to view your video link and I got an error message. Does it open for you?



#3 eastwd

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 01:49 PM

Just fixed the link to jdbastro's video. The link in my original post (but not the one in REC's reply) should work fine now. Thanks.


Edited by eastwd, 29 December 2015 - 02:01 PM.


#4 PEterW

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 01:53 PM

Smallest EBI performance you can as well... This numbers looks pretty good.

You will need a narrow hydrogen alpha filter, 7nm or so, maybe also a deep red one too for looking at star fields. A Fast refractor or Newtonian will also give good views with some added focal reduction.

 

Good luck

 

peter



#5 eastwd

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 01:58 PM

Smallest EBI performance you can as well... This numbers looks pretty good.

You will need a narrow hydrogen alpha filter, 7nm or so, maybe also a deep red one too for looking at star fields. A Fast refractor or Newtonian will also give good views with some added focal reduction.

 

Good luck

 

peter

Thanks, Peter.  Looks like the EBI specs are the same for both units I'm considering (and for all 10 types of NVD Micros that are listed on nvdepot's website, for that matter), so it looks like there'll be no drop-off on that front if I go with a white phosphor model. 



#6 Eddgie

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 05:10 PM

Hi Larry,

 

I won't get into the actual hardware stuff because I have a poor track record with stating anything to do with the technology, and rather than make more stupid mistakes I will leave that part of the dialog to others.

 

I do want to mention two points though.

The first is that the "List Price" and "Buy Now" prices are both over what you should pay.    In most cases, if you contact your preferred authorized NVD agent, they will give you a lower price than is even shown on their web page, so don't hesitate to ask for a discount off of the current web listed price.

 

If you don't believe my, you can go on to Ebay, and for any of these devices, you will often see a "Buy Now" price that matches the one on the companies web page, but in many cases, you will also see a "Make Offer" button as well, and if you make a offer that is a few hundred dollars lower than the "Buy Now" price, there is a good chance you can save a few bucks.

 

Also, we know that Bruce at Night Vision Universe has been successful in having the ENVIS lens substituted for the CCTV lens that is "Standard Equipment" on the NVD Micro, and my own advice would be to try to get this on your Micro.  There are a couple of reasons for this (one is personal to me, and maybe others have not had this experience).

 

The first reason is that this lens will take a filter ring that will let you screw 1.25" fitlers directly on to the lens.   RAFCamera sells this adapter for about $30.

 

The next reason is that the 3x afocal lens snaps right on.    Now you may in time get some SLR lenses or other lenses, the 3x afocal (to me personally anyway) is the lightest and most comfortable lens I have used.   It snaps on and off easily, and you can also slide it over a 1.25" filter (though it will not snap in place).  You can also add on Mil-spec like attachments like the compass or any other standard Mil-Spec kind of accessory.  

 

Last (and the one I said was more personal) is that the aperture ring on the CCTV camera lens often gets turned accidently (wearing gloves in particular) when you are focusing the objective.    I found this happened so often that I was getting ready to mechanically pin the aperture ring in place, but the ENVIS lens came along just about then and that was that.

 

We know Bruce was successful in getting this substitution (not to say that other dealers would not be equally as successful), so he clearly knows the drill by now, and I know he will almost always come down some in price 

 

I don't have any interest at all in his or anyone else's business, and am not even endorsing him, but he has made deals in the cases I know about, and he has gotten the ENVIS in the deal at least once.

 

Don't want to involve myself in the technical merits of your decision because I am just not at all reliable source for that info, but wanted to chime in on the transaction side with what I can only hope is information you may find useful.

 

Which ever one you get, I hope you enjoy it!


Edited by Eddgie, 29 December 2015 - 05:18 PM.

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#7 eastwd

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 11:11 PM

Eddgie, thanks so much for your advice about pricing, Night Vision Universe, and the ENVIS lens.  I have a follow-up question about sourcing the 3x afocal lens you're using.  Do you mind sharing which one you have and how you sourced it?  It looks like there are several manufacturers of 3x afocal lenses out there, including N-Vision and Armasight.



#8 Eddgie

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:32 AM

Once again, I am not at all comfortable with much on the technology side because I am prone to making mistakes.

 

I can tell you that I had the N-Vision 5x and I thought that vignetting was excessive. I have not used an N-Vision 3x so I cannot comment on it.

 

I have a 3x that was sold as being a "Mil-Spec" lens and I purchased that off of Ebay and as I recall, I paid about $125 for it.    I have what appears to be the same lens for sale on Ebay for $100.

 

Be aware that when used with the clip on, this lens does vignette mildly, but when used screwed on to the ENVIS, the vignetting is greatly reduced.   I find that in either case, I am so involved in the view that the vignetting is hard to notice, but the 5x N-vision vignette so badly that I basically could not overlook it at all.

 

Here is the 3x I have.  Notice that the snap on housing is shown removed from the 3x lens and with the filter ring installed in it and the H-a filter screwed in.  I use this a lot when I am viewing at 1x because I can snap the filter on and off rather than have to tread it on and off.  For snap on use, the filter and filter mount ring would be removed, and the 3x would be threaded on to the snap on connector, and now it can be snapped on to the ENVIS.

 

The Micro is shown with the ENVIS installed.  

 

Untitled.jpg

 

You can see the shape of the 3x and I don't know anything about it (whether it is actually Mil-Spec or not) but I can tell you that I like it and used it a very great deal.  Of all of the lenses I have used, this one and the ENVIS produce the very sharpest stars when running unfiltered, and it is super light weight and compact. There is no aperture ring to turn, and focusing is super easy.  This lens simply gets used the most because it works the best for keeping the setup super small, light, and easy to use.

 

Also you can see the prototype 1.25" filter rings from RAF Camera.  Again these were prototypes he made for me, but the inventory item now has anodizing.  The silver ring you see screwed to the front of the ENVIS is the adapter, and the ENVIS has the 610nm filter on it, and the quick connector shows the other prototype ring with the H-a filter on it.   I have four rings in total (I have an NVD Micro and a PVS-7) so this way, I can leave one ring mounted in each lens (ENVIS and PVS-7) and one is installed inside a C mount adapter, and the other I am keeping until I can find a second clip on connector, where I will mount it permanently.

 

For 1x, being able to mount the H-a filter to the clip on connector is (for me,) super user friendly because I don't have to screw the H-a on and off all the time.  I just snap on the quick connector with the filter mounted, and snap it off when done.

 

Hope this helps.


Edited by Eddgie, 30 December 2015 - 09:53 AM.


#9 Eddgie

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:44 AM

Not that you asked, but the other lens I use a great deal is a Tamron SP 80mm to 200mm f/2.8.   The focal ratio does not change during zoom, so even at 200mm, it is f/8.    This is a big and heavy lens, and at the top end of what I would be comfortable hand carrying,   I am working on an adapter to allow mounting the H-a fitler behind the lens.  This lens is a Tamron Adaptall type.   I love this lens.

 

As you can see, it is quite big and fairly heavy, but not more than a 100mm binocular. I can hand hold it pretty easily but at zenith, it is literally more of a pain in the neck, though fine for me for short periods of a minute or so at zenith.

 

Of course this is just one of many lenses and I am sure that others will give you excellent recommendations as well, but there are not very many really fast zooms in this category.  This lens gives about 3.1x to 8.5x which is a really useful range.  Again, I think there will be many other recommendations for others, and this is one of the really great things about the Micro.  Because of the C mount, it will work with a huge range of SLR camera lenses, and sometimes you can buy a really high quality SLR lens for less than the price of a decent wide field eyepiece.  Ebay is loaded with them.

 

Decision is easier if you already have an old SLR camera, but I changed to the Adapall specifically because of this and the 35mm to 105mm f/2.8 lens from the same family (SP, with fixed focal ratio on the zoom).  These are the only two camera lenses I use now, so I a covered from abut 1.3x to 8.5x with these two zooms.

 

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  • Tamron SP 80-200.jpg

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#10 Eddgie

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:48 AM

The 31mm nagler in the picture is shown for scale.  The NVD Micro is so small that shown with just the 80-200, you'd get the impression that the Tamron lens is huge, and it is not. It is though quite heavy because there is a lot of glass in it. It is not physically that large though and again, that is why I put the 31mm Nagler in the picture.  Much easier to get an impression of size when something is next to it.  The MIcro makes a 50mm SLR lens look big and heavy (and well, compared to the Micro itself, they are.  Micro is amazingly small and light)..



#11 cnoct

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 12:41 PM

So I'm thinking about jumping in, and I'd appreciate some advice.  Honestly, I prefer the look produced by white phosphor tubes over the green views most night vision scopes deliver. But my preference for the aesthetics of white over green is not so strong that I want to sacrifice too much in the way of lost sensitivity, additional noise, etc.

 
If your primary use is astronomy and the tubes being considered are equivalently spec'd, I'd break it down like this;
 
- An NVD Micro with an ITT P43 (green) or an ITT P45 (white),  go with the P43 (Green)!
 
- An NVD Micro with either an ITT P43 (green), ITT P45 (white) or an L3 Unfilmed P45 (white),  go with the L3 Unfilmed P45 (white)!
 
- However if it comes down to an NVD Micro with an L3 Unfilmed P43 (green) or L3 Unfilmed P45 (white),  either phosphor type will not leave you wanting though I'd give slight edge to P43 (green) but this is only when the primary use will be astronomy as terrestrial use I'd give a slight nod to P45 (white).
 
Bottom line, if you only choosing between ITT tubes, go with the P43 (green) but if you'd like to go with P45 (white),your better of with an L3 Unfilmed P45 (white) tube than you are with an ITT P45 (white) tube.
 
Incase you missed jdbastro's old video of Barnards Loop using an ITT t-filmed P43 tube, give it a watch and contrast it with his most recent capture using a very high spec L3 Unfilmed P45 (white) tube.



#12 eastwd

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 12:07 AM

First, thank you cnoct and Eddgie for your detailed replies.  The 1.25" filter ring option Eddgie described is great, as I'd often want to be able to use an H-a filter. 

 

Guys, even with your help, I don't think I've ever been so confused about a tech purchase after putting this much time and effort into researching the options.  I waited to post this reply until I could digest what cnoct posted, and I understand he thinks unfilmed P45 white phosphor tubes manufactured by L-3 are superior to P45 white phosphor tubes manufactured by the other big tube manufacturer in this space, ITT.  But now I can't find any vendors on the web that are selling Generation 3 unfilmed L-3 white phosphor tubes with NVD Micros, and I don't know which vendors I should trust to sell me an a-la-carte setup that combines the two. Eddgie recommends Bruce at Night Vision Universe, but I see only one product on their website with a Gen 3 unfilmed L-3 white phosphor tube.  That doesn't mean Bruce can't source one, of course.  Does anyone have any recommendations on other vendors I can trust to cobble together a night vision monocular setup for me that would look something like this:

 

1. NVD Micro monocular

2. with an L-3 Gen 3 unfilmed white phosphor image intensifier tube with excellent specs

3. with an ENVIS objective lens

 

I'm kind of fixated on the NVD Micro because I know it will work in an eyepiece holder or attached via a C-mount to various lenses that can include a 1.25 inch Hydrogen-Alpha filter and that can give me crisp, low power views of the night sky.  I still can't figure out what eyepiece/ocular and body jdbastro is using in his most recent videos where he's using an L-3 white phosphor tube.  Maybe I should PM him and ask.  In the meantime, if cnoct or anyone else who's "been there/done that" has an equally versatile night vision monocular unit you think I should consider instead of the NVD Micro to combine with an L-3 Gen 3 white phosphor tube, your input is most welcome.  Thanks.

 

Larry



#13 jdbastro

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 12:50 AM

First, thank you cnoct and Eddgie for your detailed replies.  The 1.25" filter ring option Eddgie described is great, as I'd often want to be able to use an H-a filter. 

 

Guys, even with your help, I don't think I've ever been so confused about a tech purchase after putting this much time and effort into researching the options.  I waited to post this reply until I could digest what cnoct posted, and I understand he thinks unfilmed P45 white phosphor tubes manufactured by L-3 are superior to P45 white phosphor tubes manufactured by the other big tube manufacturer in this space, ITT.  But now I can't find any vendors on the web that are selling Generation 3 unfilmed L-3 white phosphor tubes with NVD Micros, and I don't know which vendors I should trust to sell me an a-la-carte setup that combines the two. Eddgie recommends Bruce at Night Vision Universe, but I see only one product on their website with a Gen 3 unfilmed L-3 white phosphor tube.  That doesn't mean Bruce can't source one, of course.  Does anyone have any recommendations on other vendors I can trust to cobble together a night vision monocular setup for me that would look something like this:

 

1. NVD Micro monocular

2. with an L-3 Gen 3 unfilmed white phosphor image intensifier tube with excellent specs

3. with an ENVIS objective lens

 

I'm kind of fixated on the NVD Micro because I know it will work in an eyepiece holder or attached via a C-mount to various lenses that can include a 1.25 inch Hydrogen-Alpha filter and that can give me crisp, low power views of the night sky.  I still can't figure out what eyepiece/ocular and body jdbastro is using in his most recent videos where he's using an L-3 white phosphor tube.  Maybe I should PM him and ask.  In the meantime, if cnoct or anyone else who's "been there/done that" has an equally versatile night vision monocular unit you think I should consider instead of the NVD Micro to combine with an L-3 Gen 3 white phosphor tube, your input is most welcome.  Thanks.

 

Larry

Hey Larry.

 

It's time I offered up a response to some of your questions.

 

Re: acquiring a new system based on the NVD Micro.  If you want one with an L3 unfilmed white phosphor (WP) tube, then you will have to purchase a-la-carte.  This means buying an NVD micro kit direct from NV Depot with the ENVIS objective upgrade.  The approx cost on this will be about $600 I believe (the kit without the ENVIS objective goes for $515, last I checked).  You'll want to get your new high spec L3 unfilmed WP tube direct from Ident Marking Services.  Talk to Jason Crum.  This guy is an NV guru and knows more than just about anyone (except cnoct) regarding picking a good tube for NV astronomy.  My WP tube used in my recent videos came direct from Jason at Ident.   The only down side to getting a new L3 unfilmed WP tube is the wait.  You'll likely have to wait approx 2 months before Jason has more of these in stock.  You'll want to get in touch with him soon in order to be added to his waiting list.

 

Other question about the monocular housing that I've been using:  It's an ITT 6010 monocular also known as a Star-Tron MK880.  These are no longer in production but do show up on eBay occasionally.  There are several relay lenses that were made for this housing which provide a 2/3rd's magnification and a 1:1 magnification.  These relays are also out of production but again do show up sometimes on eBay.  The relays were marketed by ITT and Litton a while back.  Another housing option that uses these same relays is the Litton M944/M942 monocular housing.  These are also out of production but probably a bit easier to find on the used market than the ITT 6010/S-T MK880.

 

Here's a shot of an ITT 6010 unit with its standard eyepiece (on the left side of the unit).  This eyepiece is removed and replaced with a relay lens for photography/video:

 

Itt_NQ6010_zpsnbhz9vku.jpg

 

This is what TWO of the four relay lenses look like (shown are the Litton 1:1 relay left and ITT 1:1 relay right with T-adapters for Sony E-mount):

 

MyLittonIttRelays_Side_zpsb73011eb.jpg

 

and a shot of a Litton M944/942 unit which can also use the relays shown above.  The ocular in this shot is on the right (it's a PVS-18 ocular in this case):

 

RearSideShotWithOcular_zpshhu0mttm.jpg


Edited by jdbastro, 02 January 2016 - 12:52 AM.


#14 eastwd

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 01:31 AM

jdbastro, thanks a million for your excellent post and all your help!  Thanks to ideas, images, and info from you, cnoct, and Eddgie, I expect I'll be joining the ranks of image intensified amateur astronomers after I collect some more paychecks.  :p

 

Cheers!

 

Larry



#15 cnoct

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 04:42 AM

I'll second jdbastro's referral, there is no better source for L3 tubes from than Jason Crum.

Jason and his company (Ident Marking) don't just sell NV gear, they design, manufacture, test, evaluate, draft performance specifications and work directly with manufacturer and firms such as L3 ETO, NVESD, ICT Laboratories, ItP Technology, HVM Technology etc...

Having been to Idents facility, it's more design, engineering and prototyping than a retail location, definitely not simply a shipping/receiving warehouse.

This is classic Jason Crum at work; Jason Crum means business firing MP5K in briefcase

As jdbastro stated, buy the Micro Kit (minus tube tube)and ENVIS objective directly from Night Vision Depot, source an L3 unfilmed/filmless white phosphor tube from Jason Crum at Ident Marking and assemble at home or send the Micro housing to Jason and have him assemble it. If your so enclined, fly into directly into Rockwall Municipal Airport and he'll pick you up, take you back to his facility and have the unit built as you watch. Bonus to this is you'll see some pretty insane things.

Installing an image intensifier into the Micro is blindfold simple, here's a video that shows just that, a super simple process; Night Vision Depot Micro Monocular Image Intensifier Installation

As far as a POC at night vision depot, I've always dealt with Michael Graham (michael.graham@nvdepot.com) but anyone there will be able assist you with this request.
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#16 charotarguy

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 10:32 AM

This is classic Jason Crum at work; Jason Crum means business firing MP5K in briefcase

 

That is insane  :shocked:  :shocked:   :lol:  :lol:  :lol: . How does he keep track of which is right side of the briefcase? 



#17 Michael Miles

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Posted 15 January 2016 - 04:44 PM

 

This is classic Jason Crum at work; Jason Crum means business firing MP5K in briefcase

 

That is insane  :shocked:  :shocked:   :lol:  :lol:  :lol: . How does he keep track of which is right side of the briefcase? 

 

 

I sense a Darwin Award future recipient in this question.  Say hello to my little briefcase..



#18 StarMike8SE

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 08:29 AM

This is great info and a great thread.  I am also thinking about an NVD Micro.  One question I have.  If you get the 1.25" eyepiece tube so i can use it on my scopes, what is the equivalent mm size of the NV.  When i drop in my APU-1 video camera, it is like putting in an 8mm eyepiece, so I was curious how the NVD Micro compared.   Thanks



#19 Eddgie

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 09:34 AM

It will be equivalent to a 17.5mm to 18mm field stop (the tube window is 18mm, but the best design document I have seen says the photocathode has a 17.5mm illuminated circle, but this is probably at f/1.2 where the housing may shade the very outside edge of the light cone).

The specs tend to list the eyepeice as 26mm but I have seen 27mm as well, and even 26.5mm, but somewhere in that general range.

Apparent field is 40 degrees, but it is a pretty busy 40 degrees.  When I look at Orion at 1x, the 40 degree apparent field is pretty crammed with stars, and my brain does not really have time to register the narrow apparent field because my eyes are far to busy roaming over all the stuff in the field of view.

 

Anyway, will be like using a 26mm eyepeice with a 17.5mm field stop and 40 degree apparent field (or there about).  



#20 cnoct

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 11:08 AM

One question I have.  If you get the 1.25" eyepiece tube so i can use it on my scopes, what is the equivalent mm size of the NV.  

 

The Micro is closely equivalent to a standard 27mm eyepiece.

 

The most accurate measure for the Micro comes in at 27.8mm. 


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#21 StarMike8SE

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 02:01 PM

 

One question I have.  If you get the 1.25" eyepiece tube so i can use it on my scopes, what is the equivalent mm size of the NV.  

 

The Micro is closely equivalent to a standard 27mm eyepiece.

 

The most accurate measure for the Micro comes in at 27.8mm. 

 

Thanks, i was hoping it was something like that.  My APU-1 at 8mm in my SCT requires a lot of focal reduction to get the FOV down to a usable size.  27mm is not bad at all



#22 Sarkikos

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 06:48 AM

Installing an image intensifier into the Micro is blindfold simple, here's a video that shows just that, a super simple process; Night Vision Depot Micro Monocular Image Intensifier Installation

 

Where's the video?  When I click on the link, it just loops around back to this thread.

 

Mike



#23 cnoct

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 07:53 AM

Installing an image intensifier into the Micro is blindfold simple, here's a video that shows just that, a super simple process; Night Vision Depot Micro Monocular Image Intensifier Installation

 
Where's the video?  When I click on the link, it just loops around back to this thread.
 
Mike

 
:wavey: NVD Micro Monocular Build

Must have butchered the link in the original post!

If I butchered it again, see if the link in my sig works.

#24 Sarkikos

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 07:58 AM

Yes, now it's working.  Thanks!

 

:grin:

Mike



#25 Sarkikos

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 08:09 AM

I am considering following the suggestions in this thread and ordering the Micro body kit from Night Vision Depot and the L3 Unfilmed P45 (white) from Night Vision Universe.

 

Although it would be easier and better if NVD offered the Micro with the L3 Unfilmed P45 and their 10 year guarantee.  I'm not sure what kind of guarantee NVU gives for their tube.

 

But cnoct's advice in a post above gives me pause:

 

However if it comes down to an NVD Micro with an L3 Unfilmed P43 (green) or L3 Unfilmed P45 (white),  either phosphor type will not leave you wanting though I'd give slight edge to P43 (green) but this is only when the primary use will be astronomy as terrestrial use I'd give a slight nod to P45 (white).

 

Mike


Edited by Sarkikos, 21 July 2016 - 08:09 AM.



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