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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#4451 paul m schofield

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 01:07 PM

Late report from Saturday night and Sunday morning...I know, two demerits. First quarter moon, mid 70's F. with a light westerly breeze and medium humidity. Used my 80mm f/11.4 Celestron/Vixen on the LXD75 eq mount set up in my light sheltered spot in the back yard. Comfort is important and I was able to spend the whole session sitting down. Transparency was good and seeing was excellent with no clouds.

1. Moon: scanning with the 14mm UWA (65x) is my favorite, so much detail, and sharp as a tack. Straight wall a fine line and shadows along the edge of the Alpine Valley, mountain tops protruding from the dark with the rising sun, and one cratorlet in Plato visible in the 9mm and 7mm orthos. (101x and 130x) I turned on the drive and put in my highest power 5.5 UWA (165x). Image still sharp and steady with detail along the terminator breathtaking in intricate detail. No CA was seen with my old eyes at any crators or along the edge of the moon.

2. Moved to Rigel: a tiny blue dot next to the primary in my 16mm KoII (57x). Best view in the 9mm and 7mm orthos.

3. On to M42 and the clusters that flank it. The 14mm UWA really highlights this whole area using the slo-mo on the Dec. Beautiful double 750 in the cluster ngc1981. M42 was finest in the 8.8mm UWA (103x) with the Trapesium sharp and descent nebulousity for in town viewing. Try as I may I could not tease out the e and f stars.

4. On to Zeta Orionis, Alnitak. My 12.5mm ortho (73x) showed elongation and the best split was with the 6mm ortho (152x) and the 5.5mm UWA (165x).

5. Dropped down to the fine multiple star Sigma. Crisp stars best in the 9mm ortho and the faint triple 761 beside it. My 6" Newt. shows a faint blue member in Sigma but was not visible in the 80mm.

6. Slewed to Sirius but no Pup seen. I know, only 80mm, but I had to try. Sirius is so bright that even my old eyes see blue and yellow inside/outside of focus, and the color is yellowish, not white, in the achromat.

7. Dropped down to the beautiful cluster M41. Only the brightest stars are seen here in town but it's nice to pick out the red giants. Best view with the 8.8mm UWA and a darker background sky.

8. Went up 2 degrees from Sirius and scanned east in Dec over to M47. Nice bright cluster, best in the 8.8mm UWA. Tried for neighboring M46 but could only see a faint grouping of tiny stars. This definitely needs darker skies.

9. Last but not least I zeroed in on Castor, nearly overhead. Separation was easy in the 16mm but the best view was in the 5.5mm UWA. At 165x the two stars were perfect spheres, each with a faint diffraction ring, absolutely stable with slightly different sizes. Wonderful. What a way to end the evening.

10. The next morning I set up the 80mm again with the solar filter. The one sunspot seen had the classic fried-egg look with the fainter outer portion a ragged edged circle. The dark inner part was also circular with a ragged edge and a white streak near the middle that made it look like an eyeball with a glint mark. Fascinating.

Well, that's it. It's amazing what you can see with an old long achromat even from the middle of the city. And good stable seeing conditions really help too.

Clear and steady skies,
Paul
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#4452 davidmcgo

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 03:47 PM

Been experimenting making a Reflectix jacket for my 1965 Celestron C10 and had really good results making cooldown less disturbing on the images.  There have been a number of threads on the Cats and Casses forum on this and the effect is to significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall and suppress a lot of the big convection plumes that wreck in focus detail at high power.

 

I might do a second layer or wrap the rear cell, but with one layer and rapidly falling evening temperatures, I was able to see Sirius B and the Rille in the Apline Valley on the Moon directly and for more than fleeting split seconds!  Other than some dead still muggy summer nights, it was one of the few times that scope has been limted by the atmosphere outside the tube rather than cooldown effects inside it.

 

It was dark and looks kind of ugly, so no pictures.

 

I also made a little baby sleeve for my Questar which also helps a lot there.  A roll of the stuff is pretty cheap, so is velcro.  My initial tests with the Questar were with a thinsulate lined cap laying over the top of the tube which showed improvement in several seconds and was pretty interesting to see the out of focus star while the top side of the tube was covered or not.

 

Dave


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#4453 Juha

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 12:06 AM

Moon :) it was nice.


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#4454 terraclarke

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 01:09 PM

Had a little fun in the Sun today. Finally something to look at. Somebody punched the Sun, he has a big black eye (AR2738). I took Goldie out to see if anything was up in Hα, not too much, some nice chromospheric surface detail but no really good prominences today. White light views were quite nice with the FC60 with both the Baader filter and the Unitron solar prism. Nice granulation, limb darkening, and lots of good umbral and penumbral detail around AR2738.

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#4455 Steve Allison

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 01:36 PM

Love that pedestal mount!


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#4456 Astrobril

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 01:39 PM

Last couple of days I've been capturing the Moon with my Polarex NS114 (Unitron 114) to see how this classic scope performs with an ASI178MC and Baader Fringe Killer filter. For the occasion they were paired to a Star Adventurer mount. on a classic Manfrotto tripod.
Stacking was done with Autostakkert! 2.6.8 and Photoshop CS6.

Amazing contrast!

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#4457 terraclarke

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 06:35 PM

Love that pedestal mount!


Thanks. At 3 and a half feet its a nice height for short refractors. I keep it wrapped in plastic under the covered part of my deck year in and year out. It’s a great grab and go solution. Just need to take out a small scope and pop it on.

Next up tomorrow, weather permitting- Fun in the Sun Part II with my 1955 Unitron 114. Will do solar projection and also direct solar viewing with the solar prism, and then Hα with the Unitron.
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#4458 Bomber Bob

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 08:32 PM

For once I won't curse our weather.  We got a short-lived massive gap in the mid-level clouds, and rather than mess with Bresser testing, I popped the C90 on the VersaGo.  My Goto prism was in the house, so I used the .965" Vixen that came with this spotter, plus my spectros eyepieces.  While the Moon was below oak-level, I got a very nice & clean Castor split at 50x with the KE20.  Switched to the KE25 for 40x, and resumed my Gemini study (while I can - it's getting close to The Swamp's LP Dome!).  Started between Alpha & Beta, and moved "down" E - W field by field, simply enjoying the views.  Swept over to M35 -- not so rich so low.

 

Seeing was a solid 8 / 10.  C90 stayed sharp at 200x with the PL5, and I studied Tycho's innards.  (After the Bresser, NOT seeing false color is its own reward!)  This little Mak frames the whole Moon very well at 40x!  And, it's not as blindingly bright as it is in other scopes.

 

Like my C5, my C90 is another Goodwill Good Deal.  Got that Hy-Score 457 headed my way from the GW, too -- another gem, I hope!

 

**  Looks like my adding a vintage 5x24 finder to the C90 was a good thing.  I had to take it apart to tap two bracket holes through the primary mirror housing (yeah, I was sweatin' that operation!).  And while it was in pieces, I gave all the optics a cleaning -- that paid off.  **


Edited by Bomber Bob, 17 April 2019 - 03:54 PM.

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#4459 terraclarke

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 06:43 AM

I had the wonderful little Tak FC-60 out last night on my Edmund pedestal mounted GEM. Spent about an hour and a half perusing the Moon. I love my 0.965” Tak diagonal and my set of 0.965” circle T and Vixen eyepieces (Kellners from 40mm thru 12.5mm and 9,7,6,5 and 4mm orthos). The little scope has become my favorite grab and go since the mount is always set up on the deck, its just the OTA in one hand, the little box of eyepieces in the other and a few steps out the door. Schroter's Valley and the area south of Rima Brayley near the waxing limb between Mare Imbrium and Oceanus Procellarum was facinating last night, being perfectly placed with regard to light, shadow, and perspective. The block faulted stepped inner walls of Kepler and Copernicus were fetching as well and the rays of ejecta thrown out from Tycho were brilliant! I also checked out the Apollo landing sites.


Edited by terraclarke, 17 April 2019 - 08:36 AM.

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#4460 Senex Bibax

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 08:22 AM

Woke up far too early this morning, it was clear so I went out back with my C90. Jupiter was a sharp, bright little circle with three moons visible to one side. Saturn was a slightly smaller little dot with the rings clearly visible at an angle. Swung the scope around 180 degrees for a nice clear view of Mizar (easily split) and Alcor. Frost starting to form on the tripod (-3 C at 5:00 this morning in Ottawa) and the lightening predawn sky drove me indoors at that point.


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#4461 terraclarke

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 09:05 AM

Next up tomorrow, weather permitting- Fun in the Sun Part II with my 1955 Unitron 114. Will do solar projection and also direct solar viewing with the solar prism, and then Hα with the Unitron.

In the immortal words of Robert Burns (and Mr. Geiger, the best English teacher and one of the finest teachers I ever had):

 

In proving foresight may be vain;
The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men
Gang aft agley,
An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
For promis'd joy!

 

In other words, there is a continuous veil of cirrostratus and altostratus overcast presenting at best, a ragged disk of our solar orb. It looks like the little Unitron won’t be coming out this morning after all. So unfortunately, today’s Fun in the Sun, Part II is cancelled due to weather. :(


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#4462 Starrynightowl89

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 11:16 AM

Four planets in one morning is a real treat!

Yes it was a great viewing. Seeing conditions were great. We live near a small town but just outside of the city's limits so the sky gets very dark here. Technically I could et in 5 planets in a night because Mars has been setting to the West. I just have my 90mm ETX so Jupiter and Saturn are the best to view at the time.

 

Four planets are awesome! I'm thinking M7 as your cluster?

It very well could have been. Honestly, I have no clue. Admittedly, I don't know the night sky as well as I'd like to but I'm working on it. I study my books and try to venture outside of my comfort zone. I try to get in a little sky watching as much as I can but I also work a morning shift usually consisting of approx 3:30/4:00-7:30/8:30 A.M. I usually break out the telescope from about nightfall to around 9:30 P.M. or so unless it's my weekend and seeing is good. It's actually one of the reasons why I'm a bit reluctant to get a GoTo scope just yet because it ruins some of the fun. I think I'll have an easier time finding it next time I get the chance and if I can remember I'll message you about the findings.


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#4463 Bomber Bob

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 08:19 PM

Another night, another big cloud gap.  I turned The Thing loose on it.  This is that ATM 5" F5 RFT with the triplet lens:

 

ATM 5 RFT T23 (Polaris Eagle Mount).jpg

 

Since this photo in 2017, I've added a Big 60mm Orion-branded finder, and made improvements to the focuser.  The lock knob fell off, so I made the rack & pinion firmer with parts from Joe Sunseri (Thanks Joe!).  I tested it for slippage tonight with Castor & Pollux near the zenith.  

 

On axis, The Thing is CA-free, and I got a clean split of Castor at 40x with a 1.25" ER16, and a beautiful split at 70x with a UO HD OR9.  Move the star towards the edge, and it becomes an orange-red blob, then red-orange comet before leaving the field.  Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds indeed!  But that big ole weird lens bagged M35 at 0045Z  Makes sense why someone built an OTA around it.


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#4464 Peter_D

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 06:53 AM

Another interesting session observing the moon with my Vixen R114m. What I'm begining to appreciate is how varied and diverse the lunar surface is. Last night, I examined the South West rim - the crater Phocylides initially caught my attention with its shadows and craters but the neighbouring Wargentin turns out to be quite unusual: it is a crater that was filled by lava and after cooling  a raised plateau was left. 

 

In the smartphone image, Phocylides is upper centre

and Wargentin is to the upper right.

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#4465 AllanDystrup

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Posted 19 April 2019 - 06:13 AM

.

     A row of sunny days and "moon'ey" nights here in the heart of April.

 

     I took my small classic 55mm Vixen refractor out this noon for a closer look at the sun in white light.

         
Solar Vixen.jpg

    

     There's a hole in the sun towards the west; -- the sunspots and surroundings are often best observed when close to the edge of the sun, where the penumbrae of the spots  seem to sink like depressions down to the central hole, and the surrounding plage areas are lit up by winding fire dragons.

    

     Looked great today with Baader solar film + a Zeiss 10mm ortho, but the best view was with my Lunt solar wedge + a Zeiss 25mm OPMI eyepiece.

    

Solar AR 2019-04-19.png

    

     -- Allan

 


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#4466 Pete W

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Posted 19 April 2019 - 10:20 PM

Had the 76mm Sears 6339a out in the backyard riding a Celestron CG-5 with a 16" tripod extension borrowed from an astro-buddy.  With the legs extended the EQ head is well over my head.  The mount is comfy to use - no kneeling - but it is shakier than I'd like.  

 

Full moon, but figured I'd plow through some doubles.  The highlights were Xi UMa (tight binary, dark gap separating the pair. @ 160X), STTA 111 in UMa (wide unequal pair of 6.5 and 10th mag stars)  STF 1555 in Leo (listed as a sub arcsecond pair of 6.5 mag stars; no hint of resolution), STTA239 in Leo (another wide pair of 6.5 and 10mag stars, though the primary was distinctively orange), Cor Caroli (not a challenge, but always a nice view), 2 CVn ( its 8th mag companion pops out well with AV)  and epsilon Hydrae (3.3 & 6.7 mag @ 3.3").  Epsilon Hya was tougher than I expected with the companion occasionally popping into view on the closest diffraction ring, but the seeing wasn't great and the highest mag I could muster was 160X with a 7.5mm Celestron Ultima.  

 

Also too a quick look at M65 & 66 before the moon rose over the nearby houses.  M 66 was quite obvious but both popped out well with AV.


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#4467 Pete W

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 10:26 PM

Two clear nights in a row...who would have thunk it!  before the moon rose the Sears 6339a spent some time tracking down bright Messier galaxies in the Virgo cluster.   The highlights, in order:

M99, M87, M49, M60 (nice bright center), M59 (surprisingly obvious), M104 (stopped by Canali 1 asterism named after my astro mentor when I was a kid).

 

Other bits and pieces:  globular M3, M53; coma galaxies M64 (surprisingly big), NGC 4725 (faint!).  

 

The more it gets used the more I’m liking the 76mm 6339a...makes me almost forget its shipping cost.


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#4468 Bomber Bob

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Posted 21 April 2019 - 06:06 AM

I spent more time this morning testing the new Bresser 4" refractor, but my 1971 Criterion RV-6 gave some superb views of Jupiter at 200x (UO HD OR6) & 240x (spectros PL5) in 6-7/10 seeing.  NTB was a deep orange peel color, while the STB was a medium brown with a rough / frayed northern edge.  Got a good break-out of the polar regions with 2 white ovals.  A large festoon had a long "tail" with bends & knots trailing after it.  Black barge in the SEB really stood out.

 

The "new" focuser carried the Radian 4, but 300x was a bit too high with Jupiter skimming the treetops, and the humidity shooting up from the usual river fog.


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#4469 jcruse64

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Posted 22 April 2019 - 09:36 AM

A little solar observing on the 60x 1000 Hino Mizar. Where'd all the spots go????


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#4470 terraclarke

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Posted 22 April 2019 - 11:44 AM

Clear and mild last night. Had a bit of time to check out M51 and M81 and M82 which were exceptionally well placed for the Fujinon Faworski 4” F6.4 on the deck.

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Edited by terraclarke, 22 April 2019 - 06:09 PM.

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#4471 TerryWood

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Posted 22 April 2019 - 03:25 PM

The weather was unexpectedly clear for most of the night last night, so the Dynamax 6/B&L 6000 SCT needed to stretch it legs. It's been a while. The moon beckoned. I had to use the full frame 35mm format Sony A7S to fit the whole moon on the sensor. I ended up stacking 30 frames and used Adobe Lightroom for the final adjustments. Sometimes the colors and intensity come out wonky when I post an image to CN, versus the actual saved image from Lightroom. Hopefully it's not too crazy. 

 

Final image downsized and converted to jpeg for posting. It will probably look clearer when you open it versus the compressed preview image. 

 

I know these don't get much love, but this scope always seems sharp to me. 

 

We'll be up early to catch Jupiter this coming morning too! 

 

V/R

 

Terry

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Edited by TerryWood, 22 April 2019 - 03:30 PM.

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#4472 TerryWood

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Posted 22 April 2019 - 04:00 PM

And here's one from earlier in the week (April 15) using the VernonScope Brandon 94mm and Sony Nex 5N camera. Man, I love that Brandon scope!

 

Downsized, cropped, and converted to jpeg for posting. Again, the image will look clearer when you open it. Thanks again!

 

V/R

 

Terry

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#4473 terraclarke

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 08:12 AM

I woke up last night just before 2:00 and couldn’t go back to sleep. Being wide awake, I took a look out of the open bedroom window and saw moonlight and twinkling stars so I thought, why not! I toddled down stairs and out on the deck, barefoot and in my PJs. It was beautiful! Vega was blazing away with Lyra up about 60°, Deneb was rising over the neighbor’s roof and Altair was twinkling through the new Spring foliage of their backyard tree. How glorious to see the Summer Triangle again! The Strong Man was approaching Zenith, Arcturus had just culminated, and the Claws of our friend the Scorpion were well up! Best of all tho was a beautiful juxtaposition of the gibbous Moon and old Jupe, separated by less than degrees. The sky was dappled with random scattered altocumulus clouds, with wisps of cirrus and the hint of cirrostratus above them. I could tell immediately it wasn’t a night for a telescope as I contemplated what instrument to take out. I gave strong consideration to my ATM ST80, but alas, not wanting to waste the perfection of the totality of the night and be disappointed with the imperfections brought on by just the meteorological component, I reached for my 12x60 Oberwerks- not yet classics but still well seasoned and at least half way their. I came back outside with them in one hand and a cool glass of water in the other, slumped down in a comfy Adirondack chair, took a gulp and began renewing acquaintanceships with stellar friends I hadn’t seen in months! It was a glorious hour. I came in, went to bed and just woke up. It’s ten after nine and the coffee just finished brewing. I’m out on the deck again and about to have my first sip. What a glorious hobby we share my friends. It’s a time machine! Last night I was fifteen all over again.  


Edited by terraclarke, 23 April 2019 - 08:27 AM.

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#4474 TerryWood

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 08:59 AM

Well good morning Terra! What a great read, I felt like I was right there! Me, I was up most of the night although I did manage a few winks before going out to image Jupiter and the moon. Beautiful, clear, and pretty steady for a change. I'm beat, but still managed some h-alpha just after the sun came up. Will post some pics late today. Eating breakfast now and then hitting the hay! V/R Terry
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#4475 terraclarke

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:13 AM

Thank you Terry, I’m glad to know I wasn’t alone out there on such a glorious, warm spring night! The Moon and Jupiter were just beautiful!


Edited by terraclarke, 23 April 2019 - 09:13 AM.

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