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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#4851 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 08:56 AM

several day of half way decent seeing.

  Don't want to jinx anything  with Stellafane coming up

   but  can the seven mad gods that rule the seas keep this going


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#4852 combatdad

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 10:00 AM

Was out at my local dark sky site (Morning Calm Observatory, home to a 30" Obsession) last night with the OTA from my 1971 Unitron Model 145C, 3 inch, f/16.  Had it mounted on my trusty UA Super Deluxe Unistar using a somewhat rare Unitron 8x30 viewfinder with star diagonal and the 1.25" Plossl's that came with my 1989 Unitron Model 152.  

 

Seeing was above average and spent most of the time checking out Jupiter and Saturn, some favorite doubles (Albireo, Epsilon Lyrae, Izar, Rasalgethi, Beta Cephei and Scorpii) and a few globulars (M4, M13).  Overall a great night with a few meteors (at least one early Perseid's) adding some spice!

 

Dave

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#4853 ccwemyss

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 11:34 AM

I was continuing to test the work I've been doing on the Unitron 142 that I recently got from Neil, using Jupiter and Saturn. I set up the 80mm x 910mm HOC Selsi 247 next to it, which I've always thought to have good optics. They were both adapted to 1.25", although not with the best diagonals. The Selsi had a 4.8mm Nagler, giving 190X and the Unitron a 7mm Nagler, giving 171X, so the Selsi was about 10% greater magnification. Theoretically, the Selsi has 15% more light grasp and 6% more resolution than the 75mm x 1200mm Unitron. So the Selsi, by the book, already has an advantage.

 

On both planets, I felt the Selsi had a tiny bit more contrast and definition. The edges of Jupiter's equatorial bands were just a bit more defined. It seemed a bit brighter in the Selsi, but it was also more yellow-orange, owing to the fact that the shorter wavelengths were busy elsewhere, making a nice purple halo. In the Unitron, Jupiter was a much more neutral color, with no fringing. The color difference may have contributed to the impression of brightness and contrast, and I probably should have tried some filters to check that. I could still see about the same variations in the bands themselves, but the edges were just a little bit less contrasty in the 142.

 

Saturn, being dimmer, didn't have the obvious halo, but was still more orange in the Selsi. The shadows of the rings and the planet were just barely more clear at the best moments. The Cassini division was also just a little easier to pick out -- there were more moments when I could see it in the Selsi. But in the best moments in the Unitron, it was similarly defined. 

 

In both cases, variations in seeing were more significant than the optical differences. At the best moments, the Unitron came very close to matching the Selsi. I did try the 4.8 in the Unitron, and at 250X it seemed to pull out some of the extra detail I was seeing in the Selsi, although quite a bit dimmer.

 

I also tried them on a terrestrial target -- a building about a mile away with some features illuminated by cool fluorescent lights. That allowed me to move more quickly between the two undriven scopes (each switch on the planets involved re-acquiring the target). In that context, I could not detect a difference in performance. The cooler spectrum may have played to the Unitron's CA strength. 

 

Of course, the Unitron mount was much more pleasant to use. Each time I moved the Selsi in RA, it took long enough to settle that the planet had already drifted up to a third of the way across the field. With the Unitron, I could keep my hand on the RA knob and hold the planet steady in the view. The Vixen adapter in the Selsi worked much better than the pressure-fit tailpiece of the Unitron, which didn't hold the heavy diagonal and eyepiece securely, except when they were straight up. Twice the hybrid diagonal suddenly flopped over and dropped the eyepiece on the (thankfully soft) ground.

 

Overall, given the advantages the Selsi had, with greater aperture and magnification, I think the Unitron did a good job of matching it. I'll be curious to compare them once I get the DPAC setup together.

 

Chip W. 


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#4854 Van Do9:3

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 02:01 PM

Chip,

 

Thanks for posting on the Selsi HOC 80mm f11.3. Look forward to further reports. I was able to set up the Selsi 80mm that Barry very graciously assisted me in acquiring. I've only had to time to invest in cleaning the objective. I believe the previous owner was a smoker but it came out well, I think. The photo is my sad attempt at the fluorescent diffraction rings test.

 

IMG_7582.JPG

 

IMG_7581.JPG

 

I viewed both Saturn and Jupiter a couple weeks ago with a CV star diagonal and a CV 7mm ortho (thanks to Fred and Rolo). It's amazing the size of the objects in a 80mm. The skies in NC was not prime at that time but both planets were bright and crisp. The Jovian bands were discernible but not as detailed as I was hoping, and Saturn's rings did not have individual bands. I have also tried to split Antares and the Beta Scorpi triplet but have been unsuccessful.

 

Hoping for more observations next week at the Shore.


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#4855 Wildetelescope

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 03:17 PM

2019 07 21 0240 0 Jup Io 15  lapl6 ap8rswaveASPROC

 

I was out last weekend with my F9 152 AP Starfire, circa 1989, watching Io Transit.   Had my camera out and took some image videos. The heat dome actually resulted in some pretty stable air, for my area.   The biggest issue was atmospheric dispersion, as I am at ~39 degrees latitude. You can tell by looking at the moons closely, which basically looked like rainbows in the raw data.  Took me awhile to figure out what I was looking at, since this is the lowest that Jupiter has been since I have been doing planetary imaging.  The image above has been processed to bring the color channels into alignment as best I could and sharpened to bring out planet detail.  All and all not bad for a pre -ed triplet with all flint elements:-)  The moons are still a mess but the planet does not look bad.  I suspect this scope would be perfectly fine for narrowband imaging, if I was into that.  The views are great through the EP too:-)  There are not too many examples of digital images taken with these scopes, so I thought I would share this one.  Hope you enjoy.

 

Cheers!

 

JMD


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#4856 ccwemyss

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 04:58 PM

Chip,

 

Thanks for posting on the Selsi HOC 80mm f11.3. Look forward to further reports. I was able to set up the Selsi 80mm that Barry very graciously assisted me in acquiring. I've only had to time to invest in cleaning the objective. I believe the previous owner was a smoker but it came out well, I think. The photo is my sad attempt at the fluorescent diffraction rings test.

 

It's easier with dark background, and no other lights. I use a piece of black felt, and an overhead light in my darkroom. 

 

Chip W. 


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#4857 39cross

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 11:22 AM

It's always interesting to read these stories.  Here's one from me.

 

On the evening of 7/30 I assembled the 60mm Asahi-Pentax tripod and brought the scope out under the stars. I enjoy this setup because it's easy to move around the yard, dodging the neighbor's lights and moving into gaps between trees to find optimal viewing locations as objects come into view.  Weather-wise, it was a hot evening with next to no dew, humid, plenty of bugs.

 

We had a reprise of a few of a 60mm scope's greatest hits, with a surprise thrown in.

 

First off, there was Jupiter looking sharp as a tack, all 4 major moons visible.  The GRS was just coming into view, and I was able to track its progress.  I didn't know the GRS was possible to see with a 60mm until a couple weeks ago.  It’s just a little spot but there it is.

 

Next, Albireo.  Best magnification among my eyepieces to show off the colors was 73x.  And then onto the double-double. I had clean magnification all the way up to 145x (5.5mm), which is at the theoretical max of 60x2.4.  Epsilon-2 was cleanly split at much lower magnifications, but Epsilon-1 looked best at 145x, this really highlighted the difference in magnitudes between the two companions.

 

Next stop, M57 just to remind myself what it looks like in a small scope.  Maybe a hint of the hole in the ring with averted vision at 73x.

 

And now for the bonus, Beta-Lyra, aka Sheliak.  I noticed when framing up for M57 that there was a nice little companion star to Sheliak.  I returned there and bumped up the magnification and found it has a beautiful little blue companion.  Very pretty, this was the serendipitous surprise of the evening.  If you're interested there is a beautiful drawing here:  https://www.cloudyni...ower-of-layers/ that accurately reproduces what I also saw.  He references another drawing he made of Albireo, it can be viewed here: https://www.cloudyni...ng-full-moon/.  Hat's off to you, sir!

 

And now Saturn was in view, so I turned my attention there.  The image was small but sharp, one band visible.  Rings were nicely delineated.  Maybe a hint of the Cassini division? Just my imagination I think.

 

I finished off with a random scan through Sagittarius, but my southern skies are just drowned out in the lights of Boston and suburbs.  Had a view of M22, but the skies are just too washed out to be much fun.  And that was that, packed it up and headed in.  Nothing spectacular, just a relaxing night keeping in touch with some old friends.


Edited by 39cross, 31 July 2019 - 11:23 AM.

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#4858 Bomber Bob

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 10:19 PM

Cloud dodging, stagnant air, heat & humidity -- with my 1958 Questar and my 1964 Royal 76mm F15 ...

 

Seeing was all over the place.  As usual, thickest clouds banked along the south, and I had to observe Jupiter in the gaps along the frayed edge.  (Clouds percolate in the Gulf, and slide north, where The Swamp's heat dome stops them.)

 

Jupiter:  Both scopes at ~100x.  Much brighter in the Questar, but sharper in the Royal.  Both showed the edge details in the EQ belts.  Jupiter's disk was pure white in the Q (and bright!), off-white in the Royal.  Both showed shades of gray in the polar regions, darkening towards each pole.  Bumped up both to ~200x, and the refractor punched through the haze better for the win.

 

M57 / Ring Nebula:  Big surprise on this one.  At ~40x, the nebula was sharper in the Royal.  But at ~80x, the Ring was larger, brighter, and showed edge structures not visible in the Royal..  Seeing in this part of the sky was a 7/10.  No clouds, just thin broken haze.  But, the field stars were brighter & sharper in the Royal.  Increased both to ~120x, and the Questar pulled way ahead of the Royal.

 

I don't know why, but the Questar does really well with nebulae & galaxies for its aperture.  It's very similar to my 6" Tinsley Cassegrain in that respect (the Tinsley shows the dark lanes in M31 very well).


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#4859 2696

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 10:59 AM

It was fairly clear last night, with clouds coming and going throughout, so I wasn't really able to bring out my regular rig. I noticed there was an opening in the clouds around Saturn and brought out my SUPER portable scope, a Halleyscope from the early 80's. Although this scope is very small and only sports a 40mm objective, it is very capable being that is has a zoom feature. I had great views of Saturn through this little scope, even though it was fairly small in the field of view it was super detailed and I was able to make out the rings very very well. Here's what the setup is looking like..

Halleyscope.jpg


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#4860 Pete W

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 10:29 PM

After many nights of collimation trials and (mostly) errors I finally had the orange C5 working pretty well.  There’s still some tweaking to be done but for now I’m satisfied.  I’m a newbie when it comes to SCT collimation, but the biggest complication was that the “factory” corrector setting (engraved corrector serial number at 3 o’clock) showed significant astigmatism.  Found that rotating the corrector to the 12 o’clock position greatly improved things.

 

Tonight Jupiter and Saturn were sharp at 130x and cloud details were numerous at 180x.  Izar (epsilon Boo) showed nice diffraction rings and color contrast at 130x, and even Delta Cyg was occasionally resolved at moments of steady seeing.  The double-double was the highlight-beautiful pairs with sharp diffraction rings.    Its unlikely that the scope will compete with a similar aperture Mak or Tak, but I love it’s portability, rock solid mount and tracking.


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#4861 shredder1656

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Posted 04 August 2019 - 08:52 AM

Went to the Starquest Observatory for our local association's weekly public viewing.  Due to distance from me, my schedule, and other factors, this is only the second attempt to take my scope and observe with the group.  First try ended in a deluge, and I barely got loaded back into the car in time.  This time was great.

 

Same old story from me, being that I looked at the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn.  But, it was fun to let folks have a look through the C102F.  The seeing was actually quite nice.  I used my Meade 7mm RG Ortho most of the time.  The audible gasps, and exclamations, from people seeing Saturn for the first time in "real-life" was pretty cool.  Several folks exclaimed that there was no way what they saw was actually happening in real time.  Fun!

 

Through the club's 12" and 16" Meade SCTs, I was able to get a look at M13, and the Wild Duck Cluster (?).  Both looked great and very interesting. 

 

Gentleman named Ed loaned me a TV 8-24mm zoom.  I am not sure if it was the timing relative to the seeing at that point or if it is a phenomenal ep.  As I said, I had the 7mm RG in, and Saturn looked great.  However, with the TV, Saturn appeared to be slightly brighter and more well-defined.  Nice striations on the face of the planet, and the Cassini was an unbroken, sharp, and jet-black, gap in the rings.  Probably building it up too much, but it was beautiful.  Ed was impressed too, and had nice compliments for the view.  

 

Ed also gave me a couple turns at the ep for his Tak Mewlon 180!  I have never seen one in person.  The views of Saturn were gorgeous.  As expected they were MUCH brighter than in my 4 inch, and the definition was sharp as could be.  I looked through it at 150x and the image was very rewarding.  

 

I ended up messing with my scope for a few minutes after the small lines filtered out.  I pushed her up to 450x with my 4mm RG.  Definite glaring effects from the seeing, but still very good.  Every little bit the seeing would settle slightly and I could see sharp detail that was awesome.  Backing down to 257x was still sufficient magnification, but the effects of the seeing were slightly less.  It was awesome, in my opinion.  Ed, far more experienced, of course, was again very complimentary. 

 

Fun night overall!  


Edited by shredder1656, 04 August 2019 - 08:53 AM.

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#4862 Jay_Reynolds_Freeman

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Posted 04 August 2019 - 07:23 PM

Trying out a newly-purchased Unitron 142 -- the saga continues...

 

Since the second part of this report I have had my recently-acquired Unitron 142 in the field for five additional evenings, comprising about twelve hours of observing time. All setups were at the same location, a trailhead parking lot in the Los Angeles National Forest about ten miles west of Gorman, California, and they were all since the July, 2019 third-quarter Moon. My observing program has been the Herschel-400 list, as I have mentioned here previously, and I am over half done -- 226 H-400 objects logged. It is possible to do so much of the list in so short a time without staying up late because its objects are not evenly distributed across the sky -- they are strongly concentrated in the Virgo galaxy cloud: By assiduous work I was able to catch most of these before they dived into the western horizon, then work my way eastward across the evening sky. As the current dark-moon period ended I found myself scanning the eastern horizon waiting for new objects to rise.

 

Although the Los Angeles National Forest site is not really dark, the little Unitron continues to perform well at this work. I have had no problem seeing objects once their locations were pinned down, though many were detectable only with averted vision. I have done this work entirely at modest magnifications -- 48x or 60x -- using old 0.965-inch Kellner eyepieces. I have recently gotten a copy of the second edition of _Sky_Atlas_2000.0_, and it goes deep enough that I now rarely need to consult SkySafari Pro when locating objects.

 

I have tried two variations in equipment. I loaded up a Unihex and attached it, but soon went back to a regular star diagonal: The Unihex's eyepieces stuck out so far in all directions that no matter how I oriented it, at least one eyepiece got in the way of access to the finder. Finder mounting rings with longer stalks would solve this problem, if I had any.

 

I also added a battery-powered sidereal drive from Astronomy Shoppe. This unit is rather expensive, but it is beautiful, beautifully made, and works like a charm, tracking well with even a crude polar alignment (polar axis within a couple of degrees of Polaris). It took a little fussing to get it installed satisfactorily: The drive is reversible, which means that when it is running in one direction it tends to unscrew the round aluminum right-ascension drive knob from the worm-gear shaft. For non-unscrewing operation in the northern hemisphere, my drive needed to be installed on the east side of the equatorial head. Unfortunately, the knobs on opposite ends of the worm-gear shaft were not identical, and the only one that would accept the drive was on the west side of the head. Fortunately, one can swap the knobs, and the Astronomy Shoppe drive itself can be attached on either side, so the problem was easily solved once I had figured out what was going on.

 

The 142 mount continues to be a delight to use. Setup and take-down are about ten minutes each, and the clutches and slow-motion controls are well placed and responsive. I expect I will be trying other optical tube assemblies on it in the future, but the Unitron three-inch OTA is very light, so there will be limits. I have a Vixen 90 mm f/9 fluorite that will probably do well on it, as would any smaller doublet refractor of lesser or equal focal length. A 127 mm Maksutov might work, or perhaps a small, fast Newtonian, though I do not presently have one of either of those. Triplet refractors tend to be much heavier than doublets -- there is a lot of glass in those lenses -- so I doubt the mount could carry any triplet much larger than 80 mm: My 92 mm f/6.65 Astro-Physics Stowaway is almost certainly too much for this mounting.

 

I bought this telescope for the experience of observing with a small "classic" refractor, meaning a long-focus doublet. So far, the actual observing at 75 mm f/16 is just about indistinguishable from using an equally well-corrected refractor of shorter focal ratio, such as a fluorite doublet or a triplet. Longitudinal color is negligible -- I cannot say for sure that I have actually seen any, though the seeing has not been good enough yet for a convincing star test. The only optical features that are noticeably different are that the long-focus instrument is more tolerant of focusing error and more accepting of older eyepiece designs (such as Kellners), but its narrow field of view is a bit confining when searching for difficult objects or viewing wide ones.

 

Some mechanical differences are also evident: The fact that the objective is a thin doublet makes the optical tube assembly very light, which in turn makes the whole instrument very light and easy to set up -- though not more so than, say, an 80 mm fluorite. On the other hand, a long tube is clumsier to transport than more modern designs: At 3-inch f/16 the length is no problem, at least not in my van, but if I had a Unitron 4-inch I suspect it would stay at home unused due to the difficulty of manhandling it.

 

The Unitron 142 is an excellent beginner's telescope and a pretty good lightweight transportable quick-look instrument as well. If it were still in production at a competitive price, it would give the ubiquitous 80 mm f/11-ish doublets a good run for their money. It is too bad that Unitron ceased importing telescopes, but I expect the increased portability, wider fields, and greater suitability of triplets for imaging was too much for them. On the other hand, somewhere there is an alternate world in which Nihon Seiko instead of Vernonscope commissioned Roland Christen of Astro-Physics to make apochromatic objectives for an existing line of small telescopes. I wonder what amateur astronomy would be like in that universe.


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#4863 Chuck Hards

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 07:49 AM

Get a six-inch Newtonian, Jay.  A bigger, better, and easier-to-manage telescope.  ;)

 

Just kidding, I know that you're a refractor man.

 

Terrible weather here all weekend.  Didn't get to see a thing.  New moon weekend, I shouldn't be surprised.


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#4864 shredder1656

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 09:05 AM

Two nights in a row. Kids and I went over to my sis and BIL's house for a bit. On a whim decided to take the C102F along. Prediction was "excellent seeing" and my young adult nephew, Stevie, was there, along with my younger nieces. I thought they'd enjoy taking a look, plus Stevie still has the Meade 390 that I gave him awhile back.

We had a great time for about an hour. There were some clouds, but at 250x or below, the C102F put up some beautiful views of the planets. Again with nice detail on the planet and a distinct Cassini division. The whole family really liked it.

I'm really glad Stevie pulled his out too. It's a very capable scope and have some really nice views. The best thing is, I was reminded of how horrible that 390 mount is. I think I found a good use for an SP mount and tripod that I've kept around. I think rigging up some good rings and mounting his shoe on that will GREATLY increase the ease of use.

The timing was GOOD, regarding the GRS. It had just come around into view. Jupiter was nice and sharp. The cloud bands, the GRS, and multiple (5 plus ... Actually, probably double that, or more) striations (sorry, not sure what else to call them), were extra distinct at 225x. Everyone wanted multiple turns at the ep.

I cannot pick out the "festoons and barges" that I hear others talk about. Not sure if it's inexperience or what. The views were great, regardless.

Lots of suburb lights to go with the observing, but it worked. Bikes and skateboards were still in use, so it was a little risky LoL The moon was good too, just more time in the planets.

20190804_214850-02.jpeg

Edited by shredder1656, 05 August 2019 - 05:27 PM.

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#4865 Joe1950

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 09:42 AM

Festoons are difficult unless seeing is really good. They are low contrast formations usually in the equatorial region. Plus, you have to remember that Jupiter is low off the horizon. At culmination I don’t believe it even reaches 30 degrees. It will be a few years before it gets significantly higher. That will make a huge difference.


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#4866 Joe1950

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 09:47 AM

Seeing has been so bad here, I’m thinking of taking my small 50mm Monolux out and setting it on the car roof to check seeing before dragging out the bigger stuff. 

 

Jupiter and Saturn look like they are under a half foot of babbling brook water!

 

Does anyone else do this or have a way of testing seeing before setting up?


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#4867 Jay_Reynolds_Freeman

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 02:39 PM

Get a six-inch Newtonian, Jay.  A bigger, better, and easier-to-manage telescope.  wink.gif

 

Just kidding, I know that you're a refractor man.

 

Terrible weather here all weekend.  Didn't get to see a thing.  New moon weekend, I shouldn't be surprised.

I have owned or operated long-term a total of eight Newtonians, with apertures from 3 to 12.5 inches. And I observe regularly with several telescopes much larger than the Unitron 142, -- last Saturday I set up a C-8 -- but I don't mention them here because they are generally not old enough to be classic as the term is used in this group. (Hmm, my C-8 is "classic" in another sense of the word: Inspired by "Classic Coke", I refinished the tube in day-glow red-orange ...)

 

I rather like playing with small refractors for two reasons: (1) They are generally cheaper than larger telescopes of equal quality, and (2) I take the same pleasure in chasing down difficult objects with them that anglers do in landing humungeous fish with light tackle.


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#4868 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 04:52 PM

Jay    I have the 3 inch Unitron 140 circa 1959......it rides well on the alt az    simple quality and easy movements

 

I just got the matching EQ mount for it......in wonderful shape  now its   kind of a 140/142... I am intrigued by your report concerning the Unitron motors  that Tony makes at Astronomy shoppe. That might prove to be a good addition to my Unitron 140. ...

 

I notice you refer to it as  a small refractor     I think it is longer than a small refractor as my 50mm and 60mm I call small refractors

 

I have just gotten out with it and  observed Jupiter Saturn  and some doubles   and it impresses me     I'll be using it tonight on the moon first then other targets  I like your comparison to  big fish caught on light tackle

 

I also bought from an extremely  knowledgable and helpful member here  a clamshell that she attached to a vixen bar and now the Unitron can ride on modern mounts as well.  I agree with you about the unihex   it tends to hang out in the case because   finally she also sold to me this great draw tube that is 1.25 ready and it is cool to use those 1.25 eyepieces in this 3 inch   Unitron..

 

I find it is  a great telescope  and it displays well in the living room

 

keep the reports coming      keep looking up


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 05 August 2019 - 04:55 PM.

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#4869 Jay_Reynolds_Freeman

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 09:47 PM

I notice you refer to it as  a small refractor     I think it is longer than a small refractor as my 50mm and 60mm I call small refractors

 

I have just gotten out with it and  observed Jupiter Saturn  and some doubles   and it impresses me     I'll be using it tonight on the moon first then other targets  I like your comparison to  big fish caught on light tackle

 

I also bought from an extremely  knowledgable and helpful member here  a clamshell that she attached to a vixen bar and now the Unitron can ride on modern mounts as well.  I agree with you about the unihex   it tends to hang out in the case because   finally she also sold to me this great draw tube that is 1.25 ready and it is cool to use those 1.25 eyepieces in this 3 inch   Unitron..

 

I find it is  a great telescope  and it displays well in the living room

 

keep the reports coming      keep looking up

By "small" I meant the aperture. Most of my observing has been done with a C-14 (which I can mention here, since I bought it new in 1980). Anything less than eight inches clear aperture looks positively diminutive to me.

 

I expect I will attach my 142's clamshell to a vixen bar at some point. I might also make an adapter to put a vixen clamp on the 142 mount, for using other telescopes instead of the 75/1200. I suspect there are fittings available to attach a Unitron drawtube to a 1.25 inch tailpiece, but I would have to hunt them down. For the moment, the 24.5 mm diameter eyepieces are sufficient for my purposes.


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#4870 Chuck Hards

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 09:59 PM

 

I rather like playing with small refractors for two reasons: (1) They are generally cheaper than larger telescopes of equal quality, and (2) I take the same pleasure in chasing down difficult objects with them that anglers do in landing humungeous fish with light tackle.

 

You're preaching to the choir, Jay.  waytogo.gif

 

I love a small, long achromat under a truly dark sky.  The views can be amazing, as you know.

 

If you haven't tried the Antares .965" Plossls, I recommend them.  Same glass as the 1.25" line but in the smaller barrel size.   And they won't break the bank.  

 

I know you have a penchant for naming your telescopes, have you named the 142?


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#4871 shaesavage

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 10:22 PM

I took my newly refurbed Teleminor out for it's first light with me as the owner. Seeing was pretty good, better than average. I started with the Moon. I began with my RKE 28mm and view was outstanding! The eye placement can be tricky with this eyepiece, but it seemed 'easier' with the Teleminor than any other telescope I have owned. I started to increase power using my Takahashi 0.965 orthos. I made it to the 5mm and the view was still crisp and very detailed. I went inside and grabbed my 2.8mm Hi-ortho...to my surprise, the view was still as crisp as any of the other eyepieces! That is 192x with a 2" telescope! The only downside to the 2.8mm was running out of light, the Moon was many magnitudes dimmer.

 

Next was Jupiter. I was really impressed with the detail I was seeing through a 50mm telescope. The equatorial bands very prominent and I was able to see some mottling/unevenness in the northern band. Both polar regions were visible, but not very prominent. I didn't go beyond my 5mm Ortho for magnification. I look forward to more sessions with this little telescope.


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#4872 shredder1656

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 05:58 AM

I've hit a lucky streak here.  Had the scope out last night at dusk.  Did not have time to stay out for complete darkness, but I sure wish I could have. 

 

It was a bit cloudy, but had some outstanding views of the moon.  Especially considering the fact that it was not dark yet.  Grabbed some looks at Jupiter and Saturn too, but fleeting. 

 

Snapped some cellphone pics with my adapter mounted.  I stacked a TV 2.5x barlow, my Ultima 2x Barlow, My 26mm Silver Top plossl, and had my camera at 2x zoom.  The pictures are shockingly disappointing, compared to the actual view on the phone and through the ep before and after mounting the phone, but it gives an idea. 

 

The more I use this scope, the C102F, the more I realize how nice it is. 

 

20190805_205232.jpg

 

20190805_205035.jpg

 

EDITED TO ADD :  My mistake.  Here is one of the pics that was ACTUALLY an additional 2x magnified by the camera.  I really don't know the magnification, but if I could have kept the tripod steady while focusing  that would have helped the photo.  It was a steady night, but not steady hands.

 

Is this Mare Imbrium?  I tried to adjust the brightness, etc, but I think I made it worse.

 

20190806_105652-03.jpeg

 

 

 


Edited by shredder1656, 06 August 2019 - 10:14 AM.

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#4873 Van Do9:3

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 03:51 PM

Seeing has been so bad here, I’m thinking of taking my small 50mm Monolux out and setting it on the car roof to check seeing before dragging out the bigger stuff. 

 

Jupiter and Saturn look like they are under a half foot of babbling brook water!

 

Does anyone else do this or have a way of testing seeing before setting up?

 

Joe,

 

Weather has been on/ off here in OB, NJ but Sunday and Monday nights were perfect with a few cloud slivers. Bay side house provides great viewing of orange orb sunsets, setting crescent moon, and the march of Jupiter and Saturn. It was a tough decision to bring only the 50mm and no 60mm but it’s the perfect traveler. A pleasure to use with easy quick set up and simple controls. Everyone had a turn admiring the skies and learning the stars are actually planets. And the planets have their own moons which look like tiny stars. 

 

I captured the low setting moon on iPhone. Love how the atmosphere color stains our lunar neighbor. 

 

CF4F7803-710C-4A30-8DDB-1DE0C709E2C9.jpeg

 

Hoping clear skies come your way. 


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#4874 Joe1950

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 04:30 PM

Very nice, Van! The color gives it a special look!

 

I don’t know if the seeing problems are caused by the jet stream or other conditions in the high atmosphere, or more local, due to heat being re-radiated off roofs, streets and driveways.

 

The only clue I have is that the boiling effect moves over the target fast, is in focus, moves in a constant direction and is not moving in a ground up direction. That leads me to believe it is high off the surface.

 

It’s terrible though. Some nights so bad it alters the shape of Jupiter and Saturn and moon craters by a significant amount!

 

So far, only two nights have been relatively calm.

 

Maybe that great ocean breeze clears things for you! Thanks and enjoy!

joe


Edited by Joe1950, 06 August 2019 - 04:31 PM.

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#4875 ccwemyss

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 05:36 PM

You can always quickly check the path of the jet stream here:

 

http://weather.rap.u...upaCNTR_300.gif

 

Chip W. 


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