Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

  • Please log in to reply
4896 replies to this topic

#4876 Defenderslideguitar

Defenderslideguitar

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted 06 August 2019 - 07:31 PM

I am outside with the TV Oracle   slowly getting dark and the moon looks fine with the orange glow on its starboard side  Im trying out the Oracle on the gibralter......

 

Shredder   I must get that I phone adapter thing and try some quick shots yours look pretty good

Van the southern skies of N.C. are not your old Colorado skies I guess  but it won't be so cold this winter..

 

Chip   thanks for the jetstream link    back outside we must go


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 06 August 2019 - 07:31 PM.

  • rolo, Bomber Bob, Joe1950 and 2 others like this

#4877 Joe1950

Joe1950

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9031
  • Joined: 22 Aug 2015
  • Loc: NJ, near Philadelphia, PA

Posted 06 August 2019 - 07:48 PM

Bookmarked. Thank you Chip!


  • Defenderslideguitar likes this

#4878 Defenderslideguitar

Defenderslideguitar

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted 07 August 2019 - 06:11 PM

same here   thanks Chip



#4879 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 483
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 10 August 2019 - 10:22 PM

While many of you were camping in Vermont, I was headed south to my wife's family reunion and then to lead a workshop at the University of Maryland. While there, I met up with Johann, to pick up a Unitron 140 OTA kit that I had purchased from him. That will replace the short Jaegers in the loaner set, which wasn't giving students enough magnification for the drawing assignments I give. Johann said that this later model objective gave a particularly good DPAC test. Tonight I got to compare it with the 142 that I recently got from Neil. 

 

While I was waiting for darkness I set them on a terrestrial target about a mile away, both at 200X.  I thought the 140 pulled out the details a tiny bit more. Edges of some tiny features seemed just a little sharper. But I admit this could be novelty bias. Switching the eyepieces (two different vintages of 6mm Ortho) seemed to help the 142 a little bit, without making the 140 worse.

 

On Jupiter, the 140 had better contrast at 200X, with the color in the bands just a shade darker. 

 

I then switched them both to 150X -- or so I thought -- turns out the 140 kit has a 7mm Symmach, which I mistook for the 9 in the dark. So the 142 was at 150X while the 140 was at 171X. I did notice a difference in scale, but was too busy swatting mosquitoes to think to investigate. It wasn't until I brought the scopes in and started putting them away that I caught the mistake.

 

On the moon, I felt that they were very similar, although the 142 seemed to be doing a better job. I would spot new details (like a shadow in a craterlet on the rim of another crater) that I would then have to look for in the 140. Both were giving gorgeous level of detail.

 

On Saturn, the Cassini division was at the edge of resolution, and was coming and going. But it came in more often in the 142, and the shadows of the rings and planet stood out more. 

 

Next time, I'll compare them at the same power. But I'm encouraged that the 142, which arrived with some optical problems, as I've noted in the "What did you do" thread, seems to be holding its own. 

 

Chip W. 


  • Bonco2, Bomber Bob and Esso2112 like this

#4880 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 483
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 12 August 2019 - 12:10 AM

Followup to my last post.

 

Tonight I set the 142 and 140 up with a hybrid diagonal and a Televue 8mm Plossl for 150x, moving the diagonal and eyepiece back and forth. On Jupiter, the 140 showed slightly better contrast, with the GRS swimming into view more often. But in the 142, it did appear, and was solidly there when the seeing allowed. I was fighting some high clouds for a while. The 140 seemed brighter, however. 

 

On the moon, I couldn't see any difference. The same fine features were visible in both. Plenty of detail. 

 

Using the same terrestrial target, which doesn't require chasing, I was able to study details more closely. Both scopes revealed the same tiny features. Every time I thought I'd found something in one that I hadn't seen in the other, I'd look again and there it was. But the 140 was brighter, with more contrast.

 

So I'm starting to think the difference may be in the coatings. The 142 is early 50's (no writing on the cell, thinner crown glass, coating is barely visible), while the 140 is probably from the 1970s, with a nice blue coating. 

 

I also briefly compared them against the 80mm f15 Jaegers, which just revealed that the Jaegers needs collimation. It was much softer, with refraction color bands on Jupiter. 

 

Chip W. 


Edited by ccwemyss, 12 August 2019 - 08:39 AM.

  • rolo, steve t, Ken Sturrock and 4 others like this

#4881 rolo

rolo

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8810
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2007
  • Loc: GA

Posted 15 August 2019 - 08:30 PM

No matter how much I try I just can't muster up enough energy to take out a scope. I wake up with good intentions but by the time night falls I'm just too tired. At this point, I think I'm done with observing until after my transplant...I'm very concerned cause I feel that I'm loosing interest in the hobby.


  • TOM KIEHL likes this

#4882 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 15 August 2019 - 08:59 PM

Tonight at The Swamp...

Temperature  89°F (32°C)

Humidity 42%
Wind Speed NE 6 mph
Heat Index 90°F (32°C)

 

Jupiter... low but at the meridian, and in a funky S to N low level haze that was greenish in its thicker parts with reddish thin spikes -- The Sky was On Fire!

 

I was so desperate to observe, I went out anyway.  Started to grab my Sears / Royal 76mm F15, because it's very good at punching through muck.  But with the heat, my 58 Questar on the Meade 884 looked better.  Y'all, that rig is so light, I carried it with my left hand, and my Big Accessory Case with my right.

 

As expected, the haze varied in thickness, and got very thin after about 20 minutes.  There were very small clear sky gaps in it, too.  

 

I spent this session testing different eyepieces, and I was surprised at the results.  My UO HD Orthos came in last.  My TV eyepieces came in second.  My vintage spectros .965" eyepieces won the match.  The 7mm & 5mm Plossls gave the sharpest views.  Small fields, and short eye relief, but the EQ belts were darker & had the ragged edges that I couldn't see in the Naglers.  In fact, I saw a thin greenish crescent off the sunward limb with the 7mm that wasn't in the 7mm spectros.  I make a big deal about these Swiss-made eyepieces for a reason.

 

I had the Questar in alt/az -- grab & go mode.  No hands-free tracking.  If it had been cooler, I'd still be outside.  The haze dissipated about 2020 local time -- darn it.

 

This 61 year old Questar stayed sharp at 75x per inch -- sweet!  It punched through the haze every bit as well as my 3" refractor.


  • steve t, Bonco2 and Augustus like this

#4883 Augustus

Augustus

    Fly Me To The Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7834
  • Joined: 26 Dec 2015
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted 15 August 2019 - 09:04 PM

Took out the Velvetone C8 tonight and looked at Jupiter and Albireo. This scope has some of the absolute best optics I have ever seen in any scope, period.... the sharpness of Jupiter and Albireo's Airy disks were on par with my Tak. 


  • steve t, Bomber Bob and shredder1656 like this

#4884 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 15 August 2019 - 09:17 PM

Rolando, our conditions are different, but I understand how you feel.  My cardiologist told me to expect end of day lethargy -- and he wasn't kidding.  I'm finishing up my second week at work, and 2 PM is my zero energy point every day -- even on the weekends.  My body wants to sit down & not get up.  Can you nap in the afternoons?  I can't.  I've never been able to do that.

 

I don't know about you, but this sweltering heat doesn't help.  You don't see me hauling out my 4" or larger refractors, even though I'd really like to use my 6" ED with Jupiter at its highest.  Not gonna happen this month.  And probably not in September.

 

Maybe... you could set up one of your lightest rigs outside in the late afternoon, so all you'd have to do is go out & start looking.  I was out for about a half hour tonight, and it made me feel better.  But I'm pooped now!

 

No matter what, I'm praying for you.  And I have no doubt that everyone on this Forum is pulling for you, too.  Hope you're back out there star-gazing again in the very near future!!


  • rolo, steve t, deepwoods1 and 3 others like this

#4885 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 483
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 15 August 2019 - 09:59 PM

No matter how much I try I just can't muster up enough energy to take out a scope. I wake up with good intentions but by the time night falls I'm just too tired. At this point, I think I'm done with observing until after my transplant...I'm very concerned cause I feel that I'm loosing interest in the hobby.

What about something like a pair of big binos on a counterbalanced parallelogram mount, so you can lay back in a reclining lawn chair and sweep the sky? And leave them out under a scope cover? 

 

Extreme fatigue can make anyone lose interest in just about everything. Don't think of it as diminishing your specific interest in astronomy. But do try to at least go out and look to the stars for their inspiration. Sometimes, just laying back and looking up is the best experience of the heavens.

 

Chip W. 


  • rolo, steve t, Bomber Bob and 3 others like this

#4886 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 16 August 2019 - 06:22 PM

Finally!  A hot night on tap, but a clear night.  Jupiter... at its highest, GRS prominent, and Callisto is going to skim by the south pole...

 

I can't mess with my APM 6" F8, so I'm going with a much lighter 6" F8 -- my 1971 Criterion RV-6 Dynascope.  Just got in from setting up the "new" 2nd Meade StarFinder EQ on the short pedestal.  Haven't had time or health to cut off the cradle ends, so I swapped DEC axes from the tall to the short.  With this Heat, no imaging (NWS says it'll be 90F at 2100 local!), just looking.  Besides, I've already made some excellent photos with this old reflector.  And yes, I'm carrying several sweat rags with me tonight.

 

Mission Accomplished!  In 2 sweaty hours, Jupiter in vivid colors, and a red GRS from 60x & up.  300x with a Radian 4mm gave a big disk, but the seeing didn't support it.  The dry front that cleared the skies, left them stirring too much.  170x with a Nagler 7mm was crisp, and I could see a bit of structure inside the GRS in the calmer moments.  M13 with this eyepiece was glorious.  I could look straight at its center, and the halo stars glittered.  As usual, a great DSO night got wrecked by the Moon.  While it was below the tree line, I swept back & forth between Lyra & Cygnus, savoring the rich Milky Way, and checking out all of the doubles (& a few triples!).  I used the spectros Big Barrel Kellners -- flat fields edge to edge -- at 24x, 30x, & 40x.

 

Last night was also an equipment check for my 2nd StarFinder EQ that I put on a short pedestal.  Cleaning & re-greasing paid off -- DEC axis swings as easily as my 4" Edmund's mount.  It's missing the battery pack, so I used a 9V (they don't last long but I knew it would be a short session).  Tracking was good enough for visual at 300x, and for planetary imaging.

 

I'll be in "official" recovery until the end of OCT.  So, setup takes more time -- I can't haul everything out at once. Carried the bare mount to the NE corner of the pool deck, then the counterweights, then the tube rings, then the scope -- all before dinner.  Then, I had to rest.  My gear has limits, and so do I.

 

Before I moved the OTA from my man cave (where it has a place of honor!), I checked collimation.  I could see it was slightly off, and the LASER confirmed it.  I tweaked it with the device, but you better believe as soon as Arcturus broke out, I re-checked.  Yep, had to re-tweak.  Swung the scope north to Beta Bootes, and confirmed.  ALL before I turned the RV-6 to Jupiter.  Y'all it pays off, no matter what scope you've got, or how old it is.

 

If the air had been calmer, I would've made some images.  Instead, I sat on my bar stool and gawked.  So much color -- red, brown, orange, gray, & black -- and these were true colors.  Excellent resolution at 133x with the UO HD OR9.  As usual, I kept pushing the power up, just to see...  I did discover that this vintage Japanese focuser has a tiny bit of slump with the heavy TV eyepieces that I don't see with UO HDs.  Even with the hit to resolution, the wide fields were worth it -- Jupiter & its Galileans floating in a field of stars.  Can't beat that.  Here's one of my shots from 2 YEARS AGO that shows some of what this scope can do:

 

RV-6 - Jupiter (Sundown) 20170710V06AR11.jpg

 

This old reflector thinks it's a refractor.  Only my APOs have tinier micro-dot faint stars than this 48 year old Criterion.  I locked on M13 for almost a half hour.  I'd forgotten how well the RV-6 explodes that globular.  Dazzling is the most accurate description.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 17 August 2019 - 07:19 AM.

  • rolo, steve t, paul m schofield and 1 other like this

#4887 rolo

rolo

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8810
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2007
  • Loc: GA

Posted 16 August 2019 - 06:49 PM

Rolando, our conditions are different, but I understand how you feel.  My cardiologist told me to expect end of day lethargy -- and he wasn't kidding.  I'm finishing up my second week at work, and 2 PM is my zero energy point every day -- even on the weekends.  My body wants to sit down & not get up.  Can you nap in the afternoons?  I can't.  I've never been able to do that.

 

I don't know about you, but this sweltering heat doesn't help.  You don't see me hauling out my 4" or larger refractors, even though I'd really like to use my 6" ED with Jupiter at its highest.  Not gonna happen this month.  And probably not in September.

 

Maybe... you could set up one of your lightest rigs outside in the late afternoon, so all you'd have to do is go out & start looking.  I was out for about a half hour tonight, and it made me feel better.  But I'm pooped now!

 

No matter what, I'm praying for you.  And I have no doubt that everyone on this Forum is pulling for you, too.  Hope you're back out there star-gazing again in the very near future!!

JW, I appreciate you and I hope you'll get back to 100% so you can enjoy your larger scopeswaytogo.gif  The problem I have is that along with the tiredness there's pain and soreness. Its like the soreness you feel after you over do it working out. Earlier this year I had a friend help me mount the AP180 on the CGE mount so I can use while I restore the AP Pier...Neither has happened.


  • steve t likes this

#4888 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 16 August 2019 - 07:24 PM

Dang Rolo!  Is there nothing they can do for the pain?  I'm on pain killers (mainly for my Ankylosing Spondylitis) 24x7, and it helps.  I was in ICU 3 days -- and knocked-out the whole time.  Well, at one point, they let me "rouse up" a bit, and I immediately tried to pull out the carotid artery line hanging out of my neck (has 3 bulbs on the end to inject medicine straight to the heart) -- which in my weakened condition, would have been The End of Ol' Bomber Bob!!  So, they restrained me.  And, in the process, tore the right rotor cuff in my right shoulder!  So, can't lift much with my left arm because of my rib cage; and, using my right arm hurts like the devil.

 

Sorry, know this is off-topic, except that this Recovery Stuff affects what gear I can use.  Of course, my surgeon didn't mention all these possibilities before my rib cape was cut through.  I was wide open, and held together with gauze & tape for almost 24 hours.  Freaked Debra out.


  • rolo, Augustus and Defenderslideguitar like this

#4889 paul m schofield

paul m schofield

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 301
  • Joined: 23 May 2010
  • Loc: Hollywood, Florida, USA, with grandson Ethan

Posted 17 August 2019 - 12:20 PM

The hot, humid, rainy South Florida weather gave me a break last night. Wow, a clear sky, temperature about 80F, and the humidy dropped to 60%. Nothing was dripping off me or my old 6" Omcon newt on its dob mount. I was in my dark corner of the backyard and wanted to concentrate on Saturn and Jupiter. My 80mm f/11.4 has given me quick looks lately and I wanted to see what a little more aperture would show. 

 

Jupiter was in the top leaves of a tree so Saturn was first. I like to use my UWA's with the dob mount and the planet was showing fine detail up to my most powerful eyepiece, the UWA 5.5mm (184x), but the image was still rather small. Time for the barlow, an older Orion Mag-3x made in Japan. (After doing multiple timings it actually is 3.24x). In went the 14mm UWA with the barlow (234x) and the scale was better. The image was steady, even over the corner of the roof. Cassini was sharp like an ink line. The crepe ring jumped out in its soft brown color, the A and B rings showed their subtle color difference, and the Encke minimum could be seen as a darker hue in the A ring. The banding on the planet was obvious and two moons were bright and a couple more glimmered in and out of seeing. I tried higher powers but the image was grainy although a lot of detail was still coming through. 

 

Jupiter was now in the clear although moving over the neighbor's house and the ubiquitous A/C units and their warm updrafts. The UWA 6.7mm (151x) showed a pretty good image and higher powers didn't help. Let's try the barlow again which makes the scope an f/21.5. First was a plain old 26mm Meade plossl (126x) that gave a better image than any of my single eyepieces, even my orthos. My orthos shine on my refractor. Next was my new 25mmHD60 at 131X. This was the best view, and higher powers with the barlow did not improve the image. The four moons were crisp and differed in size and brightness. The main EQ bands were dark and ragged with the tan color between them and the GRS traversing across the face of the planet. At least three grayish festoons could be seen arcing out into the center creating light oval shapes beneath them. Multiple fine bands in the north came and went as the seeing fluctuated. What a treat to see detail like this!

 

My observing buddies, my cats, were with me the whole time. and the old Newtonian worked well. It was a great evening and I wasn't soaking wet, what a bonus!


  • rolo, steve t, Bomber Bob and 1 other like this

#4890 pdxmoon

pdxmoon

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1521
  • Joined: 27 Jun 2013
  • Loc: Oregon

Posted 17 August 2019 - 01:19 PM

Last night it was some quick views of Jupiter and Saturn. I used the adapted-for-1.25 Tasco (thank you Ralph!) on a Nexstar SLT mount. It tracked beautifully.

 

Old + New. My favorite way to do it.

 

Tasco+Nexstar.jpg


Edited by pdxmoon, 17 August 2019 - 01:22 PM.

  • steve t, paul m schofield, Bomber Bob and 1 other like this

#4891 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 17 August 2019 - 02:25 PM

Tonight looks to be a repeat of last night -- only Hotter!  And, since one 6" Newtonian did so well, I thought, Why not two?

 

Got my ATM/Edmund 6" F4 Newtonian already out in the shed temp adjusting.  It'll ride on my "new" Mizar AR-1 on the Mizar Very Short Tripod.  Like the Criterion, Stubby has a high-quality Japanese focuser, but 2" rather than 1.25".  It also sports a 50mm RACI finder, but it ain't a Nihon-Seiko like the RV-6, it's a cheap Taiwan-made GSO.   (The N-S 50mm is more like a small RFT.)

 

ATM 150mm F4 Newtonian - S21 (Mizar AR1 EQ Short Pod).jpg

 

Fun Times in the Hot Old Town tonight...

 

Win some lose some:  clearer & drier air than last night, but full of fast-moving currents, and planetary seeing took a big hit.  But before the Moon arrived to spoil things, I got some fine deep sky views in the RFT.  Of all things, The Coathanger jumped out at me.  I left the RV-6 in place on the pool deck for Jupiter & Saturn, while the RFT did the tree-dodging.  These 2 Newts are an ideal pair.

 

BIF:  Wow!  I acquired & tracked a bright red meteor in Ophiuchus through Scutum and into Aquila before it burned out.  It was moving almost due east.  Stubby was at 25x with a 2" UO 30mm Erfle.  I kept hoping it would break up with a flash, but no.  

 

Also, on the Very Short Tripod, the RFT's eyepiece is at an ideal height for overhead observing (amid the darkest part of the heavens) while sitting in my most comfortable lawn chair -- a win-win situation!


Edited by Bomber Bob, 18 August 2019 - 07:17 AM.

  • paul m schofield and Joe1950 like this

#4892 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 537
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 17 August 2019 - 02:33 PM

Rolo & Bob, I'll keep you guys in my thoughts and prayers. 

 

I've been mainly solar observing this summer, and haven't seen a single sunspot in almost two months.  

 

Take Care

Steve T


  • rolo, Pete W, paul m schofield and 3 others like this

#4893 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 17 August 2019 - 02:41 PM

Rolo & Bob, I'll keep you guys in my thoughts and prayers.

 

Thank You Steve!

 

Y'all can blame me for the Naked Sun:  I bought a Lunt Wedge for the Mercury Transit, and just like that -- Poof!  sunspots went away...


  • rolo, steve t, paul m schofield and 1 other like this

#4894 Pete W

Pete W

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 203
  • Joined: 24 Feb 2008
  • Loc: Hutto, TX

Posted 21 August 2019 - 08:32 AM

Did a 2nd lithium battery test with the old C5. The first test a few nights ago found that if the battery charge drops to 3 out of 5 lights it will occasionally cut out driving the two motors.  Last night the little battery was at 4 out of 5 and worked great for the 2 hrs the scope was outside.  

 

Collimation needs tweaking every time I take the C5 out.  Its not off by much, and I have to admit I'm not seeing a dramatic improvement of the images after it is re-collimated.  Jupiter and Saturn looked quite nice; best at 170X but still impressive at 250x.  Saturn always seems sharper than Jupiter for some reason.  

 

Hit some globs & doubles too:

nu Scorpii.  All four components were visible at 170x and obvious at 250X. The tight-bright pair really popped at 250X.

beta Scorpii.  Bright and wide at 83x, a harsh blue-white pairing.

pi Aquilae.  The sub 2" double was cleanly split at 170x, but not necessarily easy.  A very appealing pair...my first observation of it.

M22.  Becoming my favorite glob.  lots of resolution at 100X. A somewhat asymmetrical appearance with a knot of "brighter" stars on its eastern side.

NGC6642. Glob to the NW of M22.  Quite faint, needed averted vision to pick out.  Simply a small faintly glowing patch.

M28. Quite small but a fairly bright center, unlike the more uniform M22. No resolution noted, but I didn't spend a lot of time on it.

M2. Smaller than M22 but with a much brighter center.  At 45x no resolution was noted; some resolution at 100x.

 

I'm enjoying the C5 quite a bit now.  The RV-6 is definitely brighter and sharper than the C5, but I can drag the C5 out in one trip, eyepieces, observing aids and all.


  • steve t, paul m schofield, terraclarke and 1 other like this

#4895 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 21 August 2019 - 09:07 PM

An hour of cloud-dodging tonight, but I ain't complaining.  I got to use my JaegerMeister 4, and I got to test my "new" shortened Tasco (Kenko) 4VTE -- now a true 40x500 astro frac.  Both scopes at 20x, and both nabbed M13 just before 0200Z.  The JM4 got The Ring about 10 mins later.  The 40mm took until 0230.  Then, the clouds lost their gaps.  Meanwhile, the F12.5 Kenko proved itself as a visual APO; first with Arcturus, then Vega, then Albireo.  The F5 JM4 is decidedly not color-free.  But that's fine.  Its wide fields are something to oooooo & aahhhh about.

 

Maybe this weekend I'll get to see Saturn & Titan floating alone & 3D in black space -- like I used to with the Royal 40mm F12.5 that came with the Lafayette Galactic.


  • rolo, Pete W, steve t and 3 others like this

#4896 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted Yesterday, 09:12 PM

A repeat of last night, except clearer, calmer, & Hotter!  Seeing was easily 8 / 10 for DSOs, and 7 / 10 for planetary.

 

Jupiter:  The Kenko 40mm at 100x with the spectros 5mm Plossl showed both EQ & Temperate belts, and the north polar region was a dark gray & more prominent than the south.  No GRS tonight -- dang it.  At 50x, Jupiter's disk was white; while at 100x, it was dimmer & slightly off-white.  In the JM4, it was yellow, and ringed in bright blue.  I stayed on Jupiter long enough to see Ganymede & Europa move relative to each other...

 

I dropped both fracs down to 25x, swung east, and enjoyed my Delphinus Doubles, then north to The Coathanger, and the Dumbbell Nebula, before ending with M92 & M13.  Along the way I compared orange, red, & blue-white stars between the Kenko and the Jaegers.  There's a pretty red star in eastern Lyra that's bloody in the Kenko, but has a bit of orange in the Jaegers -- the Kenko is much closer to reality -- same as my Swift 838, and/or my 2 fluorite APOs...

 

Stellarium:  I recently installed this atlas / planetarium software on my new laptop.  I thought it could be set to show the stars in their natural colors (or, at least, color-coded)...  but I couldn't find that widget.  When I click on a star, it shows a ton of info, including its spectral type, but it would help me identify these quicker if I didn't have to sort through the listings.

 

** If the weather cooperates tonight, I'll set up my Edmund 4" F15 Cassegrain -- it does very well on the planets, and on double stars.  **


Edited by Bomber Bob, Today, 09:53 AM.

  • steve t likes this

#4897 Richard Whalen

Richard Whalen

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2800
  • Joined: 24 Sep 2007
  • Loc: Florida

Posted Yesterday, 11:44 PM

Been a while since I have been able to observe, first night in months not overcast. Still a few clouds, transparency 5/10 at best, very hot and humid. Set up my 5" f15 achromat and a strong fan to keep the biting bugs away. Seeing started off around 4/10, and Jupiter was my first target as it was about as high as it was going to get. Nothing really interesting going on with the moons, GRS on other side I think as I did not see it. Saw 4 zones, some swirls etc. Best view was with Ziess prism, 10.5mm RG, and light blue filter. At 182x was razor sharp, even with the poor seeing. Antares naked eye was doing the jitterbug.

 

Next target was Saturn, seeing improved a bit to 5/10. Best view was with my 8mm Pentax XP, rings etched, cassini visible all the way around, crepe really stood out. Also was nice in my 8.5mm XP. 7 mm was a bit much for seeing conditions. Could see banding on planet. So best view was at around 240x. Saw 3 moons. 

 

I then stuck in the AP diagonal and my 31 nagler and did some cruising in the milky way. Star are just pinpoints on jet black background. Observed several nebula, and then went over to M13. Best view was with an old Meade 15.5 RG WF for 123x. Then M57 with same. The double double was easy, nice clean splits with a lot of black between.

 

Then I looked swung around to the east and landed on Neptune (no finder needed). With the 8mm was a tiny blue ball. With my 5mm smc ortho was still tiny, just less so. So I decided to go to my 3.8mm xp for 500x. Was a bit bigger, still a pale blue and tack sharp. Tried with a 2x barlow for 1000x but was to ambitious as it softened up considerably. Maybe on a better night lol.

 

This scope is so easy to use, point it like a gun from the hip and the object is usually in the fov. Optics are excellent, and for a 5" it does really well. Time to get back out, had my coffee.


  • John O'Hara, steve t and terraclarke like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics