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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#5026 Joe1950

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 12:38 PM

There was an Edmund classic scope that was not manufactured but could be built by using their readily available parts. I believe it used a 3” mirror and was configured to give right side up and correct images for terrestrial views using an additional prism at the eyepiece.

 

A unique scope arrangement.

 

However, the main tube sat on your shoulder as you peered through it and it looked very much like a rocket launcher of today. Certainly not something to enjoy in a crowd. 


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#5027 TerryWood

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 02:55 PM

Thanks again everybody for your kind words and encouragement! I like to see what I can obtain from smaller apertures with good optics. It's a nice challenge. The weather changes so fast around here that I tend to go that route more often than setting up a much larger scope. The camera and seeing conditions do most of the work for me and the rest is just trial and error until I get a final image I like. Though I would like a small observatory out here one day for the C-11. Since I'm dreaming, it would be really cool to have a short enclosed walkway attached to the house that connects right to the observatory. Wouldn't have to deal with the snow on the ground in winter or possible snakes and crawlies in the summer. That's basically a pipe dream. I'll probably end up with a small enclosure on top of the deck, which is just fine too and a lot simpler. 

 

Thanks again!

 

V/R

 

Terry


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#5028 Augustus

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 03:36 PM

Thanks again everybody for your kind words and encouragement! I like to see what I can obtain from smaller apertures with good optics. It's a nice challenge. The weather changes so fast around here that I tend to go that route more often than setting up a much larger scope. The camera and seeing conditions do most of the work for me and the rest is just trial and error until I get a final image I like. Though I would like a small observatory out here one day for the C-11. Since I'm dreaming, it would be really cool to have a short enclosed walkway attached to the house that connects right to the observatory. Wouldn't have to deal with the snow on the ground in winter or possible snakes and crawlies in the summer. That's basically a pipe dream. I'll probably end up with a small enclosure on top of the deck, which is just fine too and a lot simpler. 

I spent about $350 on my TeleGizmos 365 covers for my C11. I am not sure what to expect once it starts snowing but I think you could certainly get away with keeping your scope outside the majority of the time, at least in the warmer part of the year.


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#5029 ccwemyss

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 08:42 PM

Then the police arrived..........followed by back units  ...why do I attract the law? .Im technically trespassing  or could have been mistaken for a thief I guess lurking behind farm machines

 

Been there.  30 years ago I had my cannon-like 8” dob set up on the edge of a cemetery In Nashville when the patrol car stopped by.  Was in the spotlight for awhile before one of the officers approached.  After some incredulous looks and questions I offered the officer a view of Jupiter.  That glimpse changed everything.  Lots of science questions and questions about the scope.  His partner eventually took a peek at Jupiter.   They didn’t chase me away but discouraged me from setting up here again...someone called my presence in.

 

So only trespass with a scope if Jupiter or Saturn are up!

A late member of the local astronomy club lived in an apartment downtown, near a town cemetery, which was the only place he could observe. He just made a point of going into the police station once, introducing himself, and telling them what he was going to be doing, with an open invitation to stop by any time for stargazing. They never bothered him (occasionally came by to look through the scope).

 

He always said that it was one of the darkest spots in town (and the neighbors were very quiet). It's not a small town, but also not a city -- wouldn't work everywhere, of course. 

 

Chip W. 


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#5030 Augustus

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 10:29 PM

Brought the C8 to Ward, looked at various Messier objects, the visible planets and C/2018 W2 (Africano). Dew cut my observing short (dew shield is coming Monday though) so I wound up looking through other people's scopes more than my own (mostly new Dobs).


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#5031 Bomber Bob

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 11:38 PM

"If it weren't for bad luck, I'd have no luck at all.  Gloom, despair, and agony on me!"  [Maybe some of the old folks will recognize this tune.]

 

Drove us home from The Gulf this afternoon.  Skies were deep blue crystal clear at 1800L, and no Moon until midnight -- finally!  Put Stubby on the Mizar ShortPod, and my Dakin 4 on the Polaris/Mizar.  Went out at 1845 to see Jupiter before it got into the muck, got some sharp views in the Dakin, turned to Saturn and... the first cloud belts rolled up from the south.  Got maybe 20 minutes with Saturn, as the belts increased in number & size.  But there were Gaps.  These were the low clouds, initially thin, and I could observe in the lanes.  But at < 500' AGL, they move quickly, so I was sweeping all around the sky...

 

Then the belts stopped moving north, piled up, and became a solid deck.  Good Grief!  The skies above were perfect for deep sky -- figures.  On CN:  "I have no mouth, and I must scream."  [Now that's a Dangerous Vision.]  Given the goose-egg night, I'm glad I chose these portable Classics (I had thought about using my APM 152ED, but it takes a lot of time & effort to set up.).  Oh, and insult to injury:  Temps were 12* cooler than my previous session -- no sweat rag required.


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#5032 rolo

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 07:53 AM

That's how it goes sometimes JW. Looks we're going to have a week of clear skies around here, we may be close enough to have similar seeing conditions.

 

I took out the old FC100 for a short session and to re-familiarize myself with the Skysensor 2000 computer. Got out around 9:30 pm and Jupiter was already in the muck, as you say. I did make out the GRS and a few bands but limited to aprox 120x with a 7mm Nagler.

 

Looked at a few easy targets and then did a careful start test on Altair with and without a green filter using a 7mm & 5mm Ortho. Really nice diffraction rings that I dare say were better than any of the three FS102's that I've owned. It may hard to be 100% sure since it was a while back but going from my star testing notes its what I would conclude. If I didn't know it was inside or outside of focus I wouldn't be able to tell by looking at the diffraction rings. One thing that I look for and have found it to be somewhat rare, is really smooth and clean diffraction rings. Its not uncommon to find even inside and outside focus patterns with no zones, astigmatism, or correction issues. But when that meets smooth, clean and non jagged rings, specially the outermost diffraction ring is when you know its a special optic.


Edited by rolo, 22 September 2019 - 11:02 AM.

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#5033 Pete W

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 09:16 AM

. He just made a point of going into the police station once, introducing himself, and telling them what he was going to be doing, with an open invitation to stop by any time for stargazing. They never bothered him

A sound idea.  I was too young to even consider the benefit of this approach.  It may seem creepy or disrespectful to some but observing at cemeteries provides some of the darkest urban sites. 


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#5034 Augustus

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 06:42 PM

Took out the DX8 for a quick test because it's hazy out. From my DX8 thread:
 

So I took the DX8 out for about 20 minutes to use on my back table - not the steadiest surface, mind you, but not horrible. I looked at Jupiter and ran a star test.
 
I would rate the optics at maybe 1/2 wave, yes I know it's not DPAC but this is my 94th telescope and I am pretty confident in my estimate. Jupiter is not as crisp or contrasty as my tricolor C8 but it's not horrible either, and it's no worse than some of the crappier C8s and 2080s I've had and used over the years. At 234x performance is pretty good, but at higher powers it is obviously not sharp like my tricolor.

On another note, seeing as my 10" f/3.2 RFT may not be complete as soon as I hoped, it looks like I will be bringing the C8 to the Connecticut Star Party.......
 


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#5035 Pete W

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 11:06 PM

We’ve had a string of clear nights, a bit breezy but still worth taking out a scope.  Saturday night, Sept 21, a buddy brought over his two Unitrons, a 4” Eq and 60mm alt az.  He finished fabricating a lat. adjuster so the EQ mount will work at 30 deg north.  Saturn was quite impressive thru the 4”, but I have to admit that my old cheap orange C5 did a comparable job, perhaps slightly less sharp but only incrementally so.  Also, the unbranded optics of my 60mm monolux was no slouch compared to my buddy’s 60mm Unitron!

 

Last night I had the Monolux tracking down Sagittarius globs M69, 70 & 54, plus a few NGCs who’s numbers I forget.  Also spent some time in Cass looking at sigma, WZ and a few other doubles.  Tracked down Cass opens as well:  M103 & 52, NGCs 663& 7790 (Caroline’s cluster).  Was even able to snag M76 in Perseus, not too shabby in suburban skies.  

 

And tonight the highlight was NGC 7331 (Deer-lick group) from the backyard with the Monolux.  Yes it was faint but definitely there; the nearby field stars helped pinpoint its location.  From there headed north into Lacerta and NGC7209 and the other bright cluster (7243?) who’s number escapes me.  Ended in Cygnus with M39 and NGC 7026 planetary.

 

Im lovin’ the C5 and Monolux...two inexpensive acquisitions that are great performers.


Edited by Pete W, 24 September 2019 - 06:59 PM.

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#5036 Bomber Bob

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 09:07 PM

Tonight was supposed to be a short session to align the 80mm F5 frac on the Meade 826...

 

... if it had been 10* cooler, I'd still be outside -- not good on a work night.  Heat Index was 94F at 1900L, and is 86F now.  The swelter & the skeeter swarms drove me in.

 

A 3.1" frac makes an ideal finder on this 8" Newt.  Since the OTA was originally a China-made Celestron, I put a vintage 1.25" Celestron/Vixen prism diagonal on it.  The old 16mm Erfle gives it 25x & a wide field.

 

Cloud-free night, but as the skies darkened, the ground haze rose, and seeing actually degraded.  I experimented with the CLS filters.  I don't like how the stars become a near uniform blue or blue-green, but it enhanced contrast & resolution on the Dumbbell & the Ring, and let me see M13's core straight-on.


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#5037 Augustus

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 07:32 PM

Uncovered the C11 to look at Saturn and M13, transparency seems too mediocre for anything else and I'm rather tired.


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#5038 2696

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 09:57 PM

A relaxing night, I'm actually still out here right now and I have my 7TE with me. I went right over to Andromeda and I've been observing it ever since I came out. Looks really nice in this scope, I haven't really felt the urge to point it anywhere else right now so for now that's it.. I had a little mishap a little while ago, my diagonal and eyepiece slipped out of the .965 holder and took a spill on concrete. Luckily nothing broke (also thankfully I'm using a cheaper diagonal) only a minor scuff on the bottom of the diagonal. Could've gone a lot worse.
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#5039 ccwemyss

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 10:52 PM

Had an observing night with the class. I took the 142 mount, but put the HOC ATCO on it, and also the 114 on the 140 mount that just came today. 

 

The students were all wowed by Jupiter and Saturn in the scopes. The 80mm had fine detail in the bands and the Cassini division was clear. The 60mm also had band detail, and Saturns rings were sharp -- I think it inspired a few of them to make new attempts with their loaner scopes.

 

Then I pointed the 80mm to Mizar, after having them test whether they could split it from Alcor. They all kept looking back and forth between the telescope and the star, not believing that there was a third star that they couldn't see directly. Then I showed them Almach, which some of them appreciated for the color. They were suitably impressed by M31, and then we went back to Jupiter, low on the horizon, and they were amazed that Europa had moved so far. 

 

Mostly we were practicing constellation identification, and they were really excited to connect the figures they've been working on in their star atlases and hearing about in myths to the actual star patterns. Lots of, "Oh wow! There it is! It really does look like it!" remarks. 

 

Chip W.


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#5040 Bonco2

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 03:32 PM

Finally after months of cloudy skies, the last week has yielded great views of Jupiter and Saturn, Last night at sunset I was ready with my Unitron model 142 3 inch f/16. Great contrasty detail of Jupiter's belts. GRS was not visible but it was nice to finally get such a sharp view. Saturn was very pleasing but the sky a bit shakey limiting magnification. Cassini div was visible but needed a bit more power which the sky prohibited. Still an excellent view. Just bough a 7mm Meade research grade orhto. Hope to  try  it out tonight if daytime clouds clear. Anybody familiar with this eyepiece?

Bill


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#5041 Bomber Bob

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 05:03 PM

BIF:  Have y'all tried / tested broadband, nebula, narrow-band etc. filters with your old scopes?

 

I remember trying a vintage Orion (Tani?) LPR .965" with my first Classic, the Monolux 4380, on Jupiter.  I've tried the Astronomik CLS 1.25" with the Questar -- didn't do much for nebulae & galaxies in that scope (the Dumbbell is already large & bright in it for whatever reason).  After what I've seen in this 826, I think it would benefit from some of the specialized filters on the faint fuzzies, but I'd like to hear about other's results before plunking down $$$ on them.  (I've also thought about EAA gear for the 5" F5 triplet, but that's a whole other kettle of fish for sure!)



#5042 Terra Nova

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 05:08 PM

BIF:  Have y'all tried / tested broadband, nebula, narrow-band etc. filters with your old scopes?

 

I remember trying a vintage Orion (Tani?) LPR .965" with my first Classic, the Monolux 4380, on Jupiter.  I've tried the Astronomik CLS 1.25" with the Questar -- didn't do much for nebulae & galaxies in that scope (the Dumbbell is already large & bright in it for whatever reason).  After what I've seen in this 826, I think it would benefit from some of the specialized filters on the faint fuzzies, but I'd like to hear about other's results before plunking down $$$ on them.  (I've also thought about EAA gear for the 5" F5 triplet, but that's a whole other kettle of fish for sure!)

Broadband and narrowband filters don’t do much for galaxies but they are great for diffuse, emission and reflection nebulae and planetary nebulae. I think the narrowband/nebula filters work better than the broadband/skyglow filters.


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#5043 Augustus

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 05:11 PM

The Astronomik UHC is superb, never selling mine. I'm actually going to get rid of my Celestron OIII seeing as the Astronomik all but invalidates it; the Celestron/Orion/Baader filters are much lower quality than TV and Astronomik.


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#5044 Bonco2

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 06:36 PM

Lumicon O111 is the best I've used. Works great with the Genesis revealing the Veil, Rosette, Flame neb and many others. Most broad bands I've used are not so rewarding. 

Bill


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#5045 Bonco2

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 07:50 PM

Tested the new to me 7mm research grade Meade on my Unitron 142.The seller told me I would love this eyepiece, but who knows until you try it. Well he was right. Very sharp view of Jupiter at 170X. Minimal glare. Best I've seen in years despite Jupiter so low in the SW skies. Counted between 10 to 12 contrast features with good detail on the equatorial bands.
The Nagler 4.8 was awesome too but a little fuzzy at 250X which should be expected. Same for Saturn the 7mm was the best eyepiece of choice revealing the Cassini Division and a solid view of an equatorial belt. Seems the research grade Meades are of high quality.
Bill
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#5046 clamchip

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 10:39 PM

Yes very high quantity.

My favorite is the 16.8mm,

My 3 most used eyepieces are Meade RG 16.8, TeleVue 26, and Edmund 8mm.

Robert


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#5047 Bomber Bob

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 05:37 PM

I use my RKE 8mm more than I expected when I got it.  It does well with every scope I've owned, including the real oddballs.


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#5048 Chuck Hards

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 07:32 PM

I'm amazed you can get your eyeball close enough.  I have trouble with the 8mm.



#5049 Augustus

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 08:36 PM

I was planning on bringing the C8 to the Connecticut Star Party tonight (then leaving in the morning because the weather is supposed to be terrible tomorrow night - thunderstorms) but on my way up I got in a humiliating fender bender on I-84, barely avoiding damage to the scope - the whole case went flying.



#5050 Joe1950

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 10:17 PM

That’s not good to hear. But we’re glad you’re okay, Zane! 


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