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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#5526 Terra Nova

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 07:02 PM

I’m really enjoying all your observing reports with your classic scopes Friends! It raining here with more on the way for tomorrow and tomorrow night, but hopefully the skies will clear soon because I’m itching to get out with one of my scopes! Venus is getting ready to move thru the Pleiades and I hope I don’t miss that. I also want to do a Messier Marathon from my garden observing pad soon and do it with my Questar using its setting circles. In fact, we could do a series of Messier marathons, limited by aperture using different classic instruments and report here our results.This is a good time to be planning and executing your observing sessions now that Winter has shifted into Spring. So maybe think about doing your own backyard Messier Marathon? And your classic scope activities don’t have to end at night. How about finding and observing Jupiter during the day? That’s a lot of fun and a nice challange. Plus, it’s a perfect time to work on that classic scope project you’ve been putting off whether it be refurbishing a scope, tuning, cleaning and lubing a mount, cleaning your eyepieces, creating an inventory, building a case, finishing a mirror, reading a classic astronomy book, or whatever. And at night, if it’s too cloudy to go outside, you’ll always find friends and interesting reading right here on good ole’ Cloudy Nights with all your Classic friends. The most important thing is that we all stay well and safe! So unless you have a very good reason to do otherwise, please...

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#5527 PawPaw

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 07:40 PM

Sunday looks like good skies for us finally.  In the last few weeks I have collimated 5 of my refractors including new spacers on 3 of them.  The newtonian rings are ready for some clear skies.  

 

Yesterday we had sun in the afternoon so I put a aluminum cooking pan on a fence post approx 30 yards away and used it for a star test.  Actually it worked out ok.  It was a curved pan so the sun had 3 reflections but 1 strong one that I used.  I used a green lens and really took my time as the pan did not move  :).  Then I viewed the hatch of flies and other flying insects over the meadow and blades of grass starting to emerge happily.   


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#5528 ccwemyss

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 09:45 PM

Totally clear, but turbulent. Venus was rippling at 250X, but still showed its phase very clearly. The crescent moon had moments of stillness, and the depth of the topography around Mare Crisium and Endymion was awe inspiring. Backed off to the 32mm at about 32X, to look at Pleiades and then over to Venus again to get a sense of what it will look like if I try to get it in the same view as the cluster next week.

 

Caught the double cluster just before it went into the trees. Interesting to compare with the 40mm Mono. In the Mono, the components are closer together, which really gives a sense of the pair. In the Plossl, they still had plenty of room around them, but it was an exercise in looking from one to the other, and a feeling that there was more depth to each one.

 

Quick views of Orion, the Crab, cluster hopping in Auriga, and the Alcor-Mizar-A/B trio. There was a skunk in the area and the dog was out with me, so discretion being the better part of valor, I packed up early. It's also been an exhausting week, running all of my classes online, with three of them wrapping up this week. Really sad, as I won't get to see many of the kids again until next fall. Even when I don't have them in class, I get to chat with them in the halls or at lunch, but online doesn't provide for that kind of random encounter.

 

It was above freezing tonight, although still cool enough to keep the bugs down outside. But I've swatted three mosquitos while sitting at the computer this evening. So they've hatched. 

 

Chip W. 


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#5529 steve t

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 07:26 AM

I’m really enjoying all your observing reports with your classic scopes Friends! It raining here with more on the way for tomorrow and tomorrow night, but hopefully the skies will clear soon because I’m itching to get out with one of my scopes! Venus is getting ready to move thru the Pleiades and I hope I don’t miss that. I also want to do a Messier Marathon from my garden observing pad soon and do it with my Questar using its setting circles. In fact, we could do a series of Messier marathons, limited by aperture using different classic instruments and report here our results.This is a good time to be planning and executing your observing sessions now that Winter has shifted into Spring. So maybe think about doing your own backyard Messier Marathon? And your classic scope activities don’t have to end at night. How about finding and observing Jupiter during the day? That’s a lot of fun and a nice challange. Plus, it’s a perfect time to work on that classic scope project you’ve been putting off whether it be refurbishing a scope, tuning, cleaning and lubing a mount, cleaning your eyepieces, creating an inventory, building a case, finishing a mirror, reading a classic astronomy book, or whatever. And at night, if it’s too cloudy to go outside, you’ll always find friends and interesting reading right here on good ole’ Cloudy Nights with all your Classic friends. The most important thing is that we all stay well and safe! So unless you have a very good reason to do otherwise, please...

Terra,

Great suggestions. 

We all need to do our part. 

Thanks

Steve T


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#5530 davidmcgo

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 09:39 AM

Finally had a clear night here in the San Diego suburbs and spent a couple of hours last evening with the Questar 3.5, my case of Brandon’s, the Cambridge Double Star Atlas and Sissy Haas’ book and had a lot of fun tracking down doubles that looked interesting.

 

Got some sleep after that and then came out at 0430 this morning with my 1976 C5 and grabbed views of M13 which was resolved well at 100x and also M5, M28, M22.  Nice views of M57, 27, and M17 too, M27 and M17 showed really nicely with my 0.965” 30mm Keller.  Small apparent field but phenomenal contrast on that old Vixen made eyepiece!  
 

Fially Jupier, Saturn, and Mars all cleared the garage roof and as I started watching Jupier, only two moons (Europa and Callisto) were visible off to the east but then on the west edge of the planet, Io started to emerge from transiting and Ganymede started appearing out fo eclipse a bit away from the limb.  Mars is like a little BB, no real detail noted.  Cassini’s was seen on Saturn but the seeing wasn’t really good that low.

 

And to top it off, I had the company of a a Great Horned Owl perched on the top branch of a tree across the street hooting away.  Really fun to watch it with my binoculars with the tree in silhouette against a backdrop of the glittering stars of southern Scorpius.

 

Dave


Edited by davidmcgo, 28 March 2020 - 09:40 AM.

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#5531 jf-red

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 04:07 PM

Cloudy this night, but we could see the conjunction Moon, Venus, Pleiades

Edit: tonight i had a " naked eye experience" The photo wad taken with a reflex camera: old Pentax 50mm lens, 800iso, 1sec.

tn_gallery_240965_7990_936925.jpg


Edited by jf-red, 28 March 2020 - 05:25 PM.

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#5532 Bonco2

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 04:36 PM

I love this forum, actually my favorite. But I have a suggestion for some that post here. The forum is about what you observed with your classic. Not just a what did you observe forum.

So I think it important if you post on this thread that you ALWAYS state what classic you were using. This allows the readership to get a good idea what a certain classic can reveal. It's also informative if you post what eyepieces were used but that is not as important as the instrument used. Most do this but it would be better if all do it.  Great forum!

Bill


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#5533 ccwemyss

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 06:31 PM

I love this forum, actually my favorite. But I have a suggestion for some that post here. The forum is about what you observed with your classic. Not just a what did you observe forum.

So I think it important if you post on this thread that you ALWAYS state what classic you were using. This allows the readership to get a good idea what a certain classic can reveal. It's also informative if you post what eyepieces were used but that is not as important as the instrument used. Most do this but it would be better if all do it.  Great forum!

Bill

Sorry. All of my recent reports have been with the 1976 Pentax 85. 

 

Chip W. 



#5534 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 06:50 PM

Some nights we get clouded in after all day blue skies  . Last night  I thought the clear skies would hold and I wanted to leave the house and my own yard.   Somehow I perceived Diane would be happy to see me go out for a couple of hours   having both had our share of cleaning together this and that all day....you know what I mean

 

I packed light     just the classic  Vixen 80mm fluorite and a twilight mount and the WW ll Navy binoculars.    Traveling 12 minutes and maybe 6 miles north to Easton Connecticut I was all alone at a farm. It is a good spot as Easton, a suburb, does not allow any commercial property just one gas station and several  farms.

 

Arriving after sunset....the sliver moon was a treat. Why is it that the less moon there is the more you seem to see?

Venus bold and bright  under the Baader 8-24 zoom  at medium power showing her crescent  smile.  Finally moving to the TV Delos 6mm views were steady and solid......a night of real good seeing. Classic Vixen fluorite impressive.  As it grew darker the Pleiades jumped  out so much nicer in the relatively darker skies on the farm. Venus and M-45 look good  in the Binocs, portending things to come as April arrives.
 

Swinging to port a quick stop at fiery red Alderbaran eye of the bull. Then to Orion M42,43, the trap and the Baader 8-24 allows for easy peasy wide to narrow and back. It is a competent lazy gazing  eyepiece. Swinging  to port again I hang out in the Dipper grabbing the easy double. Then as has become my habit as I end a session   I just go wide lazy gazing cruising and sweeping in no particular direction.  A good night    Social distancing   like  Eric Carmen - All By Myself (1976)

 

Upon further review I should have brought along some more aperture  like the Orange C -8 or a C-102fl   but  who knew it would be such good seeing.....?  

 

sorry I have not figured out how to do the ifone to eyepiece maneuver yet

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Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 29 March 2020 - 05:04 PM.

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#5535 Bomber Bob

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 09:31 PM

who knew it would be such good seeing.....?

 

I didn't.  We have a strong line of thunderstorms rushing towards The Swamp, and weird finger clouds that look like a giant comb.  So, I didn't move anything to the shed tonight.  Yet, there was the Moon & Venus in the clear at sundown...

 

No sweat -- my dinky Hy-Score 457 to the rescue.  For those who haven't seen one of these 50mm F10 rigs:

 

Hy-Score 457 S73 (Right Side ZOOM).jpg

 

I got a chance to test my 2 "new" Celestron / Vixen .965" eyepieces:  7.5mm Plossl & 4mm Orthoscopic.  But, I had to view the Moon straight-through -- not enough back focus with a prism diagonal.  Took a second to raise the center bar, and I could sit comfortably.  The Plossl is a very good eyepiece, but I did see a micro-thin yellow fringe.  The Ortho is sharp, but nearly put my eye out using it.  My Meade / Tani Series 2 Orthos also required straight-through, and I ran through these -- 12.5 / 9 / 6 -- and got a better view with the 9 & 6 than the (V) Plossl.  No fringing at all.

 

All 6 of my spectros .965" eyepieces work with a diagonal.  They're all parfocal, too.  I ran through all 6 on the Moon until it got into an encroaching cloud finger, then turned east to the Gemini & Cancer doubles, and all my usual targets in this area.  I ended on a high note with Algieba -- pretty pair.

 

BIF:  The funky mount works -- roughly.  I found it easier to turn the azimuth knob than push the mount around -- made the lightweight tripod shift!  (But, it was concrete, so no spikes in the lawn.)  A couple of sticky spots in the altitude, even after I stripped the mount down & re-lubed it.  Could be the slow-motion.  But honestly, these old castings aren't Unitron quality.  I think the scope would fit the hinged ring + dovetail that I made for the Swift 838.  If so, the VersaGo will be its mount -- leave the original On Display.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 29 March 2020 - 09:40 AM.

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#5536 photiost

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 10:58 PM

Finally got a glimpse of Comet c/2019 Y4 (Atlas) using the 8in f/6 Newtonian .. best views with the 12.5mm + 18mm Ultima eyepieces.

 

Very faint from my suburban back yard, found it with the 32mm Erfle (Tani) eyepiece from the 70's / early 80's.

 

Comet c/2019 Y4 is expected to get much brighter (some sources say naked eye) and soon we will be able to see it with even smaller instruments.


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#5537 Pete W

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 12:35 AM

Spent a couple of hours in the backyard with the Monolux 4380. The grass was wet from morning rain and it felt humid.  Seeing was ok, not great but not horrible.  Mostly jumped around from open clusters to galaxies with a few doubles on the way.  Hunted down objects with the Meade RG 20mm wide view then switched to the 16mm UO Konig or 12.5mm Celestron Ultima.  The highlights:

M67 in Cnc- one of my favorite clusters in small refractors.  Sparse with direct vision but much richer with averted vision.   

M3 in CVn - easily visible glob in the Monolux finder. The 12.5mm gives a hint that with darker skies some stars would be visible.  Bright but without a distinctively brighter center.

M53 in Com - looks like a dimmer version of M3.

M64 in Com- quite obvious with averted vision, was elongated with distinctively brighter center with the 12.5mm Ultima. 

M94 in CVn - after M81, this is the easiest small aperture spring galaxy. Looks like a glob with a brighter center.

M106 in CVn - took AV to see it well with the 16mm Konig.  Not round but shape was not distinct.

NGC3115 in Sextans - perhaps the best score of the night, faint, small & elongated; only popped out with AV with the 16mm.

epsilon Boo - was split with the 10mm Ultrascopic but not cleanly. The 6.3mm Halloween Plossl did the trick when the seeing cooperated.


Edited by Pete W, 29 March 2020 - 12:36 AM.

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#5538 Masvingo

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 07:25 AM

Had another rare clearish night, low cloud on the horizon and occasional puffs drifting across the crescent moon - but staying clear of Venus.  Feeling a bit headachy so decided to get first light on the latest acquisition which arrived last Monday, a mid 90s (?) Celestron C5+, it came with a modified NexStar tripod and is a great grab and go package, no effort to take outside and set up - one of the great strengths of any C5.  (When I came in I saw the barometer was nearly off the scale so am putting my headache down to the high pressure - Prestwick airport MET reporting 1049 mb (30.98 in Hg) this morning - the Scottish record is 1053.6 mb (31.11 in Hg) recorded on 31 Jan 1902 at Aberdeen.)

 

As I was interested to compare with the C11 (first light last Sunday) I started with Venus in its half phase glory, significantly smaller than in the C11 (no surprise!) and then switched over to Castor which was split nicely with a TeleVue 13mm Plössl.  As the Moon had come out from behind the cloud bank by then I switched over to it and played around with a number of eyepieces scanning up and down the terminator, the China made Celestron 25mm Plössl that came with the scope, a Celestron circle-T 28mm  Erfle, a TeleVue 13mm smoothside NJ Plössl, and Fullerscope Nihon Seiko made 40mm Ortho, 18mm Kellner, 12.5mm Ramsden and 6mm Ortho. Even the 6mm gave a pleasing view despite the low altitude and wavering image - magnificent desolation indeed! Viewing towards the south, around Vlacq (I think) was particularly enjoyable.

 

I was fortunate that the low cloud had by then dispersed sufficiently to allow a view of the Orion Nebula (unlike the previous week) and I spent a bit of time trying out the f/6.3 reducer/corrector I acquired earlier this year. To my surprise the 4 stars of the trapezium were clearer with the reducer and the 28mm Erfle than without the reducer where I needed the 13mm Plössl to get a good view.  I also experimented with both an O-III and a UHC filter, both of which brought out the nebulosity at the expense of the stars (no great surprise!).

 

By that time my head was prompting me bedwards so it was a joy to simply pick up the tripod with C5+ on top and carry the whole unit through the patio doors and then turn in after reading Scotty's (Walter Scott Houston's) comments on the Orion Nebula in Sky Publishing's Deep-Sky Wonders - so much easier than packing up the C11!  

 

And to finish off a great first light, a quick look at the Sun this morning when we got back from walking the dog (our daily allowance of one venture outside the house for exercise that is currently allowed under the lockdown!) - sadly no sunspots!


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#5539 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 08:42 AM

Nice reports keep them coming

 Magnificent desolation.....

  Magnificent isolation ...

   when we venture out alone to nowhereland.... classic in hand ....no interactions...no six feet distancing...no     conversations.... no debate....just  us alone with the stars and the heavens.  Listening to the squeaks of the just emerging insect and animal life ....

 

Sometimes you feel like the whole world is turning upside down

But If this is social distancing  it is not totally a hardship  right?    I can do this standing on my head..

 

Nowhereman  please listen 

you don't know what your missing

 Nowhereman The world    is at your command

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Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 29 March 2020 - 05:04 PM.

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#5540 Masvingo

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 09:12 AM

Barry, Wonderful post!


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#5541 BigC

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 11:18 AM

 Too tired and discouraged last night from finding water had got into storage bin and ruined many items .

 Recovered spirit enough to note the good conditions this morning and took the Asahi Pentax 60/800 az-el for a quick look at Saturn.

 Mount has one of best as-el I've used.

 Saturn and 4 moons easily seem using H21mmm so on to R9mm where the suspicion of a band became certainty with hints of a fainter second then SR4mm made both a dark and a lighter band sure with hints of another.Plus a dark spot . Not bad for 60 mm.


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#5542 BKSo

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 10:25 PM

On Saturday night I went to the dark site, alone for the first time. Again I took the only scope I have, the Meade 2045, and a new to me 25mm Leica Periplan GF 10x20 microscope eyepiece (probably made in the 80's?). The weather was great, NELM about 6.

 

Moon Wasn't setting until after 9. Took some time to collimate the scope and tested the 25 GF. Found some literal CA with the EP. Earth shine very obvious.

Venus For testing 25 GF. Low in sky and poor seeing.

M45 For testing 25 GF. Low in sky. Some light scatter around bright stars. No nebulosity.

 

Then tried some double star observation. First tried Rigel. Used 8.3 GSWH. There seemed to be a faint star just off the west side of Rigel's glare. I am not experienced with this... Then turned to Sirius. Seeing was even worse and glare much bigger. Another unsuccessful half heart attempt at Sirius B. With the Moon set some DSO watching could begin.

M81 
M82 Surprisingly best with 8.3 GSWH. The very elongated galaxy looked mottled, grasped the central dark lane.
NGC2024? Used 64 D + uhc. Might have seen something. When observing thought wrongly about the location the nebula. Later checking with star chart suggested sighting might be real.
NGC2264 Used 64 D + uhc. Fainter than last observation, because it was low in the sky?
NGC2261 Used 15UW. Small and bright like a planetary nebula. Triangular. 
NGC2244 Used 64 D + uhc. Fainter than last observation. Visible with averted vision. Large.
M36 
NGC1897, IC410 Used 40 PL and saw cluster with a misty bar. Changed to 64 D + uhc and saw bigger nebulosity but seemed to be at somewhat different position.  Shape matched star chart (checking afterwards)
IC405 Used 40 PL. Small and faint but very surely seen.

 

Then I took a break and ended up falling asleep... Woke up at nearly 3:00 and sky was great sky! Milky way was impressive even low in sky. Saw 3 meteors in quick succession, 1 very bright with trail.

 

M13 Probable with naked eye. Quick look with 25 GF. Very irregular.
NGC2403 Used 25 GF. Not very bright but easy. Uniform elongated disc. 2 foreground stars.
C2019 Y4 First star chart poor and had to switch on mobile phone and find a better chart online. Very easy after pinpointing its position. Used 25 GF. Large, circular, like M101.
M65, M66 Already low in the sky. Quick look with 40 PL. NGC3628 not seen.
M4 
M101 Easy to find. A little fainter than C2019 Y4. Circular. No detail seen with either 40 PL or 64 D.
NGC4490 Used 25 GF. Easy. Bright. Elongated 1.5:1 Sky was brightening.
NGC4449 Used 25 GF. Even easier and brighter than NGC4490, with similar shape.

M63 Used 25 GF. No detail.
Jupiter Very poor seeing even with 40 PL.


Edited by BKSo, 30 March 2020 - 11:02 PM.

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#5543 deepwoods1

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Posted 31 March 2020 - 12:31 AM

Wow! Busy, productive night!


Edited by deepwoods1, 31 March 2020 - 12:31 AM.


#5544 AllanDystrup

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Posted 01 April 2020 - 07:03 AM

.

My current classic "workhorse" plowing the night sky :

   

Moon 2020-03-27 Setup.png

Venus:  https://www.cloudyni...ion/?p=10072570

Moon https://www.cloudyni...oon/?p=10081818
    

     Take care / Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 01 April 2020 - 07:09 AM.

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#5545 PawPaw

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Posted 01 April 2020 - 08:52 AM

Broke out my 1960's Edmund 3 inch. Very lightweight and a breeze to setup.  Also setup a 4 inch Unitron altaz which I wanted to star test.

 

Edmund first:

Last night was unusually dry with low humidity for us @ 48%,  55 degrees and sparse high clouds.  Between the clouds viewing was steady.  I started with the Moon moved to Venus then M42.  I spent some time with Orion and the trapezium with different powers and filters, very nice.  

I ended the Edmund session star testing on Capella in Auriga with a green filter.  I have many floaters in my eyes but by moving my pupil around the fov and using some averted vision I could plainly see nice results both in and out of focus.

 

Unitron:

Followed the same path as the Edmund spent much time on the terminator of the moon using both my left and right eye.  My right eye has always been dominant for me but I find my left has less floaters.  Beautiful sunlit ringlets on some craters and the towering shadow of a spiked steeple in the middle of a crater, I cannot remember its name.   Also ended the session star testing on Capella with good results but not quite as good as the 3 inch above.

 

Used the same RKE eyepieces and star diagonal on both scopes to level the playing field....so to speak.  RKE's used:  28, 21.5, 15 and 12.  

Edmund cell phone pics first.  

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Edited by PawPaw, 01 April 2020 - 09:07 AM.

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#5546 PawPaw

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Posted 01 April 2020 - 08:57 AM

Unitron Cell phone pics:

 

 

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#5547 oldmanastro

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Posted 01 April 2020 - 12:45 PM

Yesterday we had really clear and quiet skies. I decided to take my recently acquired Celestron Celestar 8 with the original and now classic wedgepod. It was much easier to align the wedgepod with Polaris using a polar scope design by Terra that works great for wedge mounts. Mine is ,of course, a much more crudely made but functional one. I used an old Tasco 30mm terrestrial spotting telescope as the polar scope. I replaced the eyepiece with a 5X microscope Huygens thus increasing the field of view to a comfortable level. The polar scope made it very easy to polar align this mount. 

 

 The seeing was about a Pickering 7, not bad. Stars Airy discs were clear with a first diffraction ring that, using high power, was observed complete at some moments and broken at others. The telescope was well collimated. I decided to make some lunar images with the Orion Astroshoot MP5 camera and also ended up imaging a couple of bright doubles. At the same the session helped to test the drive repair that I performed on the mount and a homemade hand controller from a member of this forum. Both worked as they should. In all images I used a 2X Celestron Ultima shorty barlow that I bought in New Orleans back in 1993. Here are a couple of the moon images unlabelled and images of Algieba and Porrima with the same camera. I still have to work with focusing on the moon. Algieba is left and Porrima to the right.

 

  After imaging it was already late but I went directly to Omega Centauri, about 20-25 degrees altitude and at a location where the sky is dark. The view was astounding. It had been sometime since I had seen this cluster with a telescope larger than a 6 inch. It was just "full of stars" and averted vision showed what looked like tendrils of stars coming from the center. I used a 26mm Plossl at first but then changed to the 17mm Erfle and the view was even better. A 15 and 9mm Plossl gave even better detail with some tendrils becoming small pinpoint stars. I ended the session past midnight with Scorpius showing already east. Hints of summer.

 

 

Clear Skies

 

Guido

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#5548 Bomber Bob

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Posted 01 April 2020 - 04:56 PM

A CataTak Night on tap at The Swamp, and cloud-dodging...  Bonus!   Got my C5 Astro and my Takahashi FC-50 on the Ready Line in the shed.  I could probably consider my shed as a pre-observatory with all those mounts out there, plus my work bench warm-up area (yeah, I said warm-up -- not many cool-down nights this far south).  The C5 does good on just about everything, and the Tiny Tak is small sharp Moon scope.  And, IF by chance I wake up before dawn & the skies are clear, I'll grab the morning planets with the C5 -- takes little time and/or effort to move it to the SE corner.

 

No serious observing with these 2 scopes, just FUN.  IMO, a C5 isn't a serious instrument -- and there's nothing wrong with that.  Good optics, portable (easy to tote!), and good eyepiece placement -- a bit more space behind the back plate, and it would be almost at refractor comfort.  For just $250 (on Goodwill), I got a Good Scope that's just plain fun.  IF you haven't used a 1970s (pre-Halley) C5, I'd buy one of these versus a brand new "budget" 102mm EQ refractor at $300.

 

The Moon:  Post-frontal passage, large cloud gaps, and seeing jumped to 8/10.  But of course the air was turbulent.  I had my Tak FC-50 out because I love its views, and to assess the seeing.  When lunar features "shimmer" in the Tak at 80x, the upper air is choppy!  In calm moments, the C5's resolution at 140x (OR9) was impressive; and, by flocking it, the contrast was close to my Questar's.  Not too shabby!  The "shark teeth" shadows in Plato and other places along the Terminator were black, angular, and refractor-like.  All those subtle to bold grays are well-displayed, and similar to my 4" F7 ED.  Honestly, most nights like this, my AT102ED on the Mizar SP would be the very best choice.  But, I enjoy using the C5, and my other Classic Keepers when I can.  IOW:  Fun can be a valuable attribute that keeps an old scope from the landfill.

 

Having used my C5 dozens of times, I can see the SCT attraction:  Cheaper than a Questar, more aperture, "faster" photographically.  Back when this scope was new (& I was 40 years younger!), I thought of Celestrons as big telephoto lenses, because the owners I knew tended to be picture-makers.  But they work well for us visual observers, too.  Saw that last night -- again.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 02 April 2020 - 07:45 AM.

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#5549 dec12252

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Posted 01 April 2020 - 05:42 PM

I spent a few hours last night tracking down a number of doubles in Leo with my Vixen 102FL (pictured below on my AP600 mount).  I decided to just work down the list of Leo Doubles from Sissy Haas' book on double stars for small telescopes.  I did about a dozen of them.  The seeing last night was exceptional here in Palo Alto, CA - sub arc second.  One of my favorite doubles, OStruve 215, a close pair of nearly equal 7th magnitude yellow suns separated by 1.4" was cleanly split at 263x by the little refractor. The AB component of Struve 1426, a 0.9" double was not split but clearly elongated at 263x.  The moon was also tack sharp - I spent a lot of time working up and down the lunar terminator and re-familiarizing myself with some of the major lunar features.  Overall a very enjoyable evening in my light polluted backyard.  Tonight I'll track down doubles in Ursa Major.

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#5550 PawPaw

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Posted 01 April 2020 - 07:43 PM

I think this qualifies for "what did you observe with your classic scope telescope today"

 

Do you see what I see on the shower cap?

 

 

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