Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

  • Please log in to reply
5996 replies to this topic

#5976 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 384
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 30 June 2020 - 03:56 PM

This picture:

 

attachicon.gifpost-224219-0-57536500-1593527744_thumb.jpg

 

is similar to what I took last evening too, with my phone:

 

attachicon.gifMoon 6 29 20 a.jpg

 

-but I used a C8 which is showing just a bit more detail than the 60mm.

Excellent image. The two images can be used to compare the effect of aperture on image resolution. Technology is wonderful. Taking these images even 25 years ago would have required a lot of extra work using film.

 

Guido


  • Garyth64 and Defenderslideguitar like this

#5977 Paul Sweeney

Paul Sweeney

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 129
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Heidelberg, Germany

Posted 30 June 2020 - 05:34 PM

Just in from the patio. Amazingly, the heavy overcast of this afternoon disappeared, so I took the Apollo 60/900 for a test session. The moon was sharp with virtually no false color up to 130x. But it was surrounded by white haze, so I have to conclude that these lenses are not coated. Not even the light blue coatings of the 70's scopes. That's too bad. Next I hit Jupiter, though it is quite low. Got 4 moons and some banding when the seeing steadied. Saturn was up next, and showed almost no detail, it being even worse placed than Jupiter. Then I tried a few stars. Unfortunately, the focuser seems to be slightly off center, or it might be the length of the focuser tube. I get stars that resolve to dots with diffraction rings, but there is also a fan shaped splash of light, almost like coma. I'll have to see if I can somehow adjust the focuser.
  • steve t, Terra Nova, Bomber Bob and 2 others like this

#5978 Garyth64

Garyth64

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,905
  • Joined: 07 May 2015
  • Loc: SE Michigan

Posted 30 June 2020 - 06:13 PM

Excellent image. The two images can be used to compare the effect of aperture on image resolution. Technology is wonderful. Taking these images even 25 years ago would have required a lot of extra work using film.

 

Guido

I'm going to post another similar picture of the moon take with a film camera.  The picture was made by the previous owner of my 5" Apogee refractor, Michael Gainer.  He was a professor at Latrobe University, and used the scope in some of the classes he taught.

 

Moon 5 Apogee on film.jpg

 

 


Edited by Garyth64, 30 June 2020 - 06:23 PM.

  • steve t, Terra Nova, Bonco2 and 2 others like this

#5979 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 384
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 30 June 2020 - 07:09 PM

I'm going to post another similar picture of the moon take with a film camera.  The picture was made by the previous owner of my 5" Apogee refractor, Michael Gainer.  He was a professor at Latrobe University, and used the scope in some of the classes he taught.

 

attachicon.gifMoon 5 Apogee on film.jpg

Last night I took a few more with the iphone and the 60mm f/15 Sears. The Plato region was taken at 100x and the Clavius region at 150x. It takes a few shots to get a nice one plus the fact that this telescope has no clock drive. I do have a clock drive for it but the telescope is missing a small post that substitutes for one of the screws that hold the equatorial mount to the base. 

 

  It will be nice to see a film photo of the moon. There was a Kodak black and white film that gave excellent contrast on the moon. I forgot the name of that specific film. 

 

Clear Skies!

 

Guido

Attached Thumbnails

  • Moon2020-6-30-0210-60mmf-15iPhone.JPG
  • Moon2020-6-30-245UT-60mmf-15iPhone.JPG

Edited by oldmanastro, 01 July 2020 - 08:45 AM.

  • davidmcgo, steve t, Terra Nova and 4 others like this

#5980 Pete W

Pete W

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 375
  • Joined: 24 Feb 2008
  • Loc: Hutto, TX

Posted 30 June 2020 - 10:25 PM

Finally took the most recent RV-6 out for my first light with it.   Nice sharp airy disks and diffraction rings at 180x.  Only looked at Spica, Rasalgethi and the moon.  The focuser is a bit rough.  I guess I’ll start refurbishing the mount now that I know the scope is worth it.  

 

I really don’t want to take apart the gear and worm, but the RA motion is really stiff.  Surprisingly the original cork clutch is still intact - I hope I can preserve it.


  • photiost, steve t, deepwoods1 and 1 other like this

#5981 Garyth64

Garyth64

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,905
  • Joined: 07 May 2015
  • Loc: SE Michigan

Posted 01 July 2020 - 07:23 AM

Lat night I took a few more with the iphone and the 60mm f/15 Sears. The Plato region was taken at 100x and the Clavius region at 150x. It takes a few shots to get a nice one plus the fact that this telescope has no clock drive. I do have a clock drive for it but the telescope is missing a small post that substitutes for one of the screws that hold the equatorial mount to the base. 

 

  It will be nice to see a film photo of the moon. There was a Kodak black and white film that gave excellent contrast on the moon. I forgot the name of that specific film. 

 

Clear Skies!

 

Guido

Very nice.  Amazing what a 60mm and a phone camera can show.


  • oldmanastro likes this

#5982 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,230
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 01 July 2020 - 08:07 AM

Lat night I took a few more with the iphone and the 60mm f/15 Sears. The Plato region was taken at 100x and the Clavius region at 150x. It takes a few shots to get a nice one plus the fact that this telescope has no clock drive. I do have a clock drive for it but the telescope is missing a small post that substitutes for one of the screws that hold the equatorial mount to the base. 

 

  It will be nice to see a film photo of the moon. There was a Kodak black and white film that gave excellent contrast on the moon. I forgot the name of that specific film. 

 

Clear Skies!

 

Guido

Hey Guido, can you post a pic of your mount, showing what's missing?  I have a box of old Towa EQ bolts & such...


  • oldmanastro likes this

#5983 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 655
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 01 July 2020 - 08:22 AM

From a solar observing perspective June was a very good here in SW Ohio. I was able to check on the sun all but one day last month and to top it off there was a small group that crossed the face. From what I've been able to find, this group is part of the next solar cycle (#25). Hopefully the activity will start increasing.

 

Monday morning, while my observing buddy and I were checking the bird feeders, we had a very red sunrise. I'm guessing it was due to the dust from the Sahara.

 

Steve T 


  • Terra Nova, Bomber Bob and oldmanastro like this

#5984 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 22,235
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Under the Blue Moon of Kentucky

Posted 01 July 2020 - 08:59 AM

Monday morning, while my observing buddy and I were checking the bird feeders, we had a very red sunrise. I'm guessing it was due to the dust from the Sahara.

 

Steve T 

Steve, I'm just across the River from you. Did you see the amazing, brilliantly red sunrise yesterday morning? It was one of the reddest I've ever seen. The color didn't last long, only a fleeting few minutes. But, oh wow! And it certainly gave credence to that line:

 

"Red sky at morning, sailor take warning."

We had a huge thunderstorm and buckets of rain yesterday afternoon!


  • steve t, Bomber Bob, oldmanastro and 1 other like this

#5985 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 384
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 01 July 2020 - 09:17 AM

Hey Guido, can you post a pic of your mount, showing what's missing?  I have a box of old Towa EQ bolts & such...

 Hi JW

 

  Here's a pic of the 6305 equatorial head with the location where that stud goes marked with an arrow. The second pic is the base of the 4454 equatorial head. You can see the post that holds the clock drive and how it looks. The one in the 4454 does not fit the 6305 base. Some months ago I got a nonfunctional original 6305 clock drive. It was easy to repair and lubricate. The motor came with all the attachments except the post. It works well even on the 4454.

 

Clear Skies and Thank you.

 

Guido

Attached Thumbnails

  • 6305mount.JPG
  • 4454.JPG

  • Bomber Bob likes this

#5986 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 655
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 01 July 2020 - 09:17 AM

Steve, I'm just across the River from you. Did you see the amazing, brilliantly red sunrise yesterday morning? It was one of the reddest I've ever seen. The color didn't last long, only a fleeting few minutes. But, oh wow! And it certainly gave credence to that line:

 

"Red sky at morning, sailor take warning."

We had a huge thunderstorm and buckets of rain yesterday afternoon!

Terra,

Yes, we had very red skies both mornings. It put a very eerie red glow on our garden. 

 

We got some rain, but were on the eastern edge of the storms, yesterday, as they moved down your way. Our power was knocked out a few days ago due to a  lighting strike. No damage, but it took an hour to get the dogs to come out from under the bed.  

 

When we've had clear skies, I've been surprised at how stable the seeing has been. How has it been down on your side of the river?

 

Steve T


  • Terra Nova likes this

#5987 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 22,235
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Under the Blue Moon of Kentucky

Posted 01 July 2020 - 09:23 AM

It's been quit good Steve. I'm amazed how much darker the skies seem to be. I thing we've gained one whole number in typical limiting magnitude. I guess that's due largely to the sports complexes being shut down.


  • steve t likes this

#5988 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 384
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 01 July 2020 - 09:25 AM

Steve, I'm just across the River from you. Did you see the amazing, brilliantly red sunrise yesterday morning? It was one of the reddest I've ever seen. The color didn't last long, only a fleeting few minutes. But, oh wow! And it certainly gave credence to that line:

 

"Red sky at morning, sailor take warning."

We had a huge thunderstorm and buckets of rain yesterday afternoon!

We have been looking at beautiful sunsets here as a result of the Saharan dust. It's interesting but when it was too thick, like on the 23rd of June, the sunset was not spectacular. Apparently it needs a certain density to produce the light dispersion needed for the nice sunsets or sunrises. Over here it has been "Red Sky at Night Sailors Delight" and , guess what, no rain. In fact we are in a rare June drought and under water rationing starting today. frown.gif

 

Clear Skies,

 

Guido


  • steve t, Terra Nova and Bonco2 like this

#5989 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,230
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 01 July 2020 - 10:31 AM

 Hi JW

 

  Here's a pic of the 6305 equatorial head with the location where that stud goes marked with an arrow. The second pic is the base of the 4454 equatorial head. You can see the post that holds the clock drive and how it looks. The one in the 4454 does not fit the 6305 base. Some months ago I got a nonfunctional original 6305 clock drive. It was easy to repair and lubricate. The motor came with all the attachments except the post. It works well even on the 4454.

 

Clear Skies and Thank you.

 

Guido

I'll take a look today, and let you know.

 

No Joy -- got lots of chrome bolts, but not the one you need -- dang it!


Edited by Bomber Bob, 01 July 2020 - 06:46 PM.

  • oldmanastro likes this

#5990 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 655
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted Yesterday, 07:16 AM

The skies were clear and steady this morning at 2:00. The moon was bright in the western sky lighting up the backyard, so I thought I'd observe Jupiter with the 4" F10 Newtonian. At 125X I was able to make out a surprising amount of detail along the equatorial belts. I spent a little time playing with different eyepiece filters to see which one the best view. About the time I called it quits, it looked like the Great Red Spot was just starting to rotate into view.

Steve T  


  • paul m schofield, Bomber Bob, oldmanastro and 1 other like this

#5991 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 384
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted Yesterday, 08:48 AM

I'll take a look today, and let you know.

 

No Joy -- got lots of chrome bolts, but not the one you need -- dang it!

Many Thanks for taking the time to look for it JW. Eventually that bolt will pop up in someone's hand. The former owner of the motor had everything, even original box and instructions but apparently lost that bolt. I have been using the motor on the 4454 refractor with success even though it's really for the 6305.

 

Clear Skies!

 

Guido



#5992 Defenderslideguitar

Defenderslideguitar

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,347
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted Yesterday, 09:16 AM

While we are discussing bolts etc    strangely  I found that for a good source for many stainless bolts and nuts of all sizes can be found   at the local marine store      here the West marine has  a great selection  kind of like the old fashioned hardware store that closed

 

The draught of the last few weeks ended with thunderstorms and quick heavy rains each late afternoon  the last three days   kind of like down south  in Florida etc.   Oddly    we did get some clearing a couple of nights ago for looks at Luna  oh so bright       and    Spica  Arcturus  Vega   then  a random accidental double star find  while just EZ Wide fielding scanning


  • steve t and oldmanastro like this

#5993 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,066
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted Yesterday, 12:16 PM

I finally got around to taking a collimation screw from the 7TE-5 parts scope that Barry gave me and using it to get the 7TE-2 that Peter_B donated into good collimation. Still working on the mount, cleaning the diagonal and eyepieces, etc. But we had a brief clearing around 11 last night. So I put the Pentax K12.5 in the tailpiece and went out to look at the moon. Bracing myself against a wall and hand-holding the 910mm OTA at 73X, I was able to get a brief view. The RAO objective didn't disappoint. It was very sharp and nearly color free. 

 

Good motivation to get it finished up and ready to loan out.

 

Chip W. 


  • steve t, oldmanastro and Defenderslideguitar like this

#5994 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,230
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted Yesterday, 09:51 PM

sultrious Swamp session... our heat index missed the 100* mark by 1* at 1500L, and No Wind At All tonight.  River fog & lake smog so close to the ground I could almost touch it.  I had my AT102ED waiting in the shed, just in case the smears disappeared, but no...

 

So there I was with my Lafayette 60 F7 on the KDS.  Brandon 8mm presents 3 stars for the Double-Double -- a perfect Figure 8 + 1 -- and it was barely over the oak trees.  I can't recall if I've DPAC'ed this Yamamoto lens, but ideal Airy disks with the Br 8, and Nagler 7 & 5 (50x / 60x / 80x); tight split at 60x, clean split at 80x  Clouds chased me west to Hercules, moonglow kept me out of Bootes, so I picked out some doubles in the Dragon's Head, then shut down.  

 

One of these nights, I'll get to test the Brandon properly... I hope.


  • photiost, paul m schofield, Terra Nova and 3 others like this

#5995 davidmcgo

davidmcgo

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,273
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2004
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted Today, 08:46 AM

Finally the June gloom broke last night and my pinched nerve was sort of tolerable and I was able to set up my 1975 C8 and enjoy sunrise over Mons Rumker, fantastic views of Aristarchus and Schroter’s Valley, and lots of other great detail on the Moon.  In spite of the bright Moon, I had really nice views of M5, 13, 92 and M57.  Oh, and M11 and V Aquila.  I was trying an old mushroom top 16mm Koenig which works really nicely in the C8.

 

By 22:00, Jupiter was clear above my garage roof and I had a nice view of Ganymede and its shadow transiting to the North of the NEB.  There were some pretty large garlands hanging down into the EZ from the NEB.  Really nice view!

 

By 0400 this morning, neck and shoulder woke me up and it was clear so the little Q3.5 got carried out in my other arm and used briefly in alt az tabletop mode for a quick look at Mars.  Mars is getting really high elevation and I’m really excited for the views at opposition.  This morning’s view had a decent size polar cap but smaller than last time I saw it several weeks ago, and Syrtis Major was on the edge of the disk.  Eyepiece of choice was the 12mm Brandon with the barlow.

 

Dave


  • steve t, paul m schofield and Bomber Bob like this

#5996 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 22,235
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Under the Blue Moon of Kentucky

Posted Today, 08:54 AM

sultrious Swamp session... our heat index missed the 100* mark by 1* at 1500L, and No Wind At All tonight.  River fog & lake smog so close to the ground I could almost touch it.  I had my AT102ED waiting in the shed, just in case the smears disappeared, but no...

 

So there I was with my Lafayette 60 F7 on the KDS.  Brandon 8mm presents 3 stars for the Double-Double -- a perfect Figure 8 + 1 -- and it was barely over the oak trees.  I can't recall if I've DPAC'ed this Yamamoto lens, but ideal Airy disks with the Br 8, and Nagler 7 & 5 (50x / 60x / 80x); tight split at 60x, clean split at 80x  Clouds chased me west to Hercules, moonglow kept me out of Bootes, so I picked out some doubles in the Dragon's Head, then shut down.  

 

One of these nights, I'll get to test the Brandon properly... I hope.

Good for you, nights like that are a non-starter for me! I'll take a pair or two of my handheld binoculars and a comfy chaise-lounge on the elevated deck. Last night it was my 7x35 Binolux UWF (11° FOV), my Manon 16x50s and my portable slide-projector screen light shield to block my idiot neighbor's unshielded 100W white light bulb on her porch. I managed to find and track three satellites, all in polar orbits along with the Hercules Cluster, the Dumbbell Nebula, the Double Cluster, the Coat-hanger, and M4.


Edited by Terra Nova, Today, 11:34 AM.

  • photiost, steve t, rcwolpert and 2 others like this

#5997 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 384
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted Today, 09:39 AM

The night started with some clouds and definitely hazy. Transparency was no more than 2 but the clouds started to move west and only the haze remained. It was another grab and go night. I picked up the Sears 6305 again but this time removed the tube assembly from the mount and replaced it with the 60mm f/17 Carton. Polaris was not visible at all blocked by some clouds to the north. The polar alignment was a shot in the dark but again everything was ready very quickly.

 

The now past first quarter waxing moon was first. Clear and crisp. I took some images with the iPhone again. My hands are getting steadier. After a full shot, I focused on capturing the north and south regions. The Schoter Valley was still near the terminator to the northwest. The valley was clearly seen even with the 4mm ortho at 250x.  The more southerly region was also imaged with Tycho and its ray system. The images were taken at 40 and 111x with 25mm and 9mm Plossls. I stacked up two lunar filters for the whole moon pic. 

 

Jupiter was next and here I made a long visual observation. Two things were happening almost simultaneously. Ganymede's transit and the GRS Central Meridian transit. The best view was at 167x using the 6mm ortho. The image was crisp and clear and I was surprised to see the GRS so well with a 60mm telescope. At 11:34pm the GRS transit occurred and two minutes later Ganymede's transit. I observed this from the time the GRS first appeared on the planet's limb and Ganymede's shadow followed suit. As the GRS was crossing the CM, Ganymede was blending into Jupiter's limb. I remembered that, during the 60s, Jupiter's moon transits and the GRS were some of my favourites in the 76mm f/16 Sears refractor. Saturn was observed a bit low in the sky at first. Near midnight it was well up and the view at 167x was very nice showing the Cassini division and one atmospheric band. It was past midnight when I closed up shop. This morning I learned that the haze I saw yesterday was mostly the beginning of yet another Saharan dust event.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Carton60mmf17.JPG
  • Lunar2020-7-3-0125UT-60mmCarton-f17iPhone.JPG
  • Lunar2020-6-3-0130-60mmCartonf17iPhone.JPG
  • Lunar2020-7-3-0135UT60mmCartonf17iPhone.JPG

Edited by oldmanastro, Today, 09:41 AM.

  • steve t, paul m schofield, Terra Nova and 2 others like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics