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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#6301 oldmanastro

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Posted 21 August 2020 - 09:54 AM

That was a great observing report with the 60mm f/15 Monolux. It speaks tons about what these 60mm telescopes are capable of in a good dark sky, with good eyepieces and in the hands of a skilled observer.

 

Guido


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#6302 Karl Fabian

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Posted 21 August 2020 - 01:26 PM

Another early morning image of Mars using the B&L 8001 with a  2.8x Klee barlow and a first edition Celestron Neximager. Image result of 1800 stack-able frames processed entirely in Registax 4 freeware (no post processing). Inverted image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mars 08-20-2020 ut 0713.jpg


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#6303 Pete W

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Posted 21 August 2020 - 02:59 PM

Impressive shot, Karl.  I took a quick peek at Mars last night but it was still too low.  It appeared  “out of round” which I attributed to the seeing.  I didn’t realize it was so gibbous!


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#6304 Mbinoc

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Posted 21 August 2020 - 09:15 PM

At 8:45pm tonight I took out my smallest vintage scope, A "Circle T" Towa made Meade 226 60mm x 700mm Alt-Az mount. (You cant get much less in-expensive than this).  I'm not sure of the age, but it has a metal threaded dew shield, and also a metal .965 focuser.

 

4.JPG

 

I only had about 10 minutes to set up before the moon fell behind the horizon of my tree line. I snapped just a few photos and this is what I ended up with, nothing great but still a fun attempt.

 

1.jpg

 

2.jpg

 

3.jpg


Edited by Mbinoc, 21 August 2020 - 09:28 PM.

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#6305 oldmanastro

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Posted 21 August 2020 - 10:12 PM

At 8:45pm tonight I took out my smallest vintage scope, A "Circle T" Towa made Meade 226 60mm x 700mm Alt-Az mount. (You cant get much less in-expensive than this).  I'm not sure of the age, but it has a metal threaded dew shield, and also a metal .965 focuser.

 

attachicon.gif4.JPG

 

I only had about 10 minutes to set up before the moon fell behind the horizon of my tree line. I snapped just a few photos and this is what I ended up with, nothing great but still a fun attempt.

 

attachicon.gif1.jpg

 

attachicon.gif2.jpg

 

attachicon.gif3.jpg

I like that setup and if that is a Logitech Quick Cam Pro 4000, it is one of my favorites. I still have and use mine but never tried it with my Sears 60mm f/11. Those images came up very good given the low altitude of the moon. 

 

Guido


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#6306 Mbinoc

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Posted 21 August 2020 - 11:20 PM

I like that setup and if that is a Logitech Quick Cam Pro 4000, it is one of my favorites. I still have and use mine but never tried it with my Sears 60mm f/11. Those images came up very good given the low altitude of the moon. 

 

Guido

I am using a Logitech Quick Cam Pro, and just came back inside from a second attempt tonight at another target, At around 11:00pm Saturn was now view-able in my southern sky and will poke behind another tree in the next 10 minutes.

 

I'm actually pretty proud of this photo, it was captured using the exact same Meade 226 Scope pictured above with a single shot from the webcam

 

Wow was it hard to get centered and focused, but I was up for a challenge tonight. I took about 20 different single shot photos, and this was my best one. I then center cropped, resized, and adjusted the contrast using the standard windows 10 photo editor.

 

5.jpg

 

Here is my second best photo tonight through the webcam without any edits applied.

 

WIN_20200821_23_01_57_Pro.jpg

 

The Chicago burbs, have really clear sky's tonight, much better than what I typically see.


Edited by Mbinoc, 22 August 2020 - 12:03 AM.

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#6307 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 22 August 2020 - 07:01 AM

I have to get one of these cams to try and take a pic or two    nice work

 It almost begs the thread yet unnamed       show us what pic(s) you can take with your smaller  classic scopes 


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#6308 Mbinoc

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Posted 22 August 2020 - 10:52 AM

I have to get one of these cams to try and take a pic or two    nice work

 It almost begs the thread yet unnamed       show us what pic(s) you can take with your smaller  classic scopes 

Thanks, If you are interested, This is what I used.

 

1.JPG

 

(Logitech Quick Cam Pro 4000 - Webcam Barrel Adapter - UV/IR Cut Filter - 1.25" - .965 Adapter)

 

The webcam by itself adds a significant amount of power without any balows used. I just attach it like I would any eyepiece..


Edited by Mbinoc, 22 August 2020 - 11:04 AM.

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#6309 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 22 August 2020 - 06:17 PM

Thanks so much for that      so much to learn   


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#6310 oldmanastro

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Posted 22 August 2020 - 06:49 PM

Thanks, If you are interested, This is what I used.

 

attachicon.gif1.JPG

 

(Logitech Quick Cam Pro 4000 - Webcam Barrel Adapter - UV/IR Cut Filter - 1.25" - .965 Adapter)

 

The webcam by itself adds a significant amount of power without any balows used. I just attach it like I would any eyepiece..

That's a neat adapter for the Logitech. I made one with a plastic 35mm film canister. They fit 1.25" focusers perfectly and somehow the IR block filter fits there. Nice camera for old classics. 

 

Guido


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#6311 highfnum

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Posted 23 August 2020 - 10:44 AM

orange c8 70's 2x barlow

mars solis planum  "the eye of mars" 

BW and color 

closest thing to "the canals on mars thing"

"hub and spokes"

 

Capture 8_23_2020 5_46_25 AMc8.jpg

Capture 8_23_2020 5_32_32 AMc8.jpg


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#6312 Terra Nova

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Posted 23 August 2020 - 10:59 AM

orange c8 70's 2x barlow

mars solis planum  "the eye of mars" 

BW and color 

closest thing to "the canals on mars thing"

"hub and spokes"

 

attachicon.gifCapture 8_23_2020 5_46_25 AMc8.jpg

attachicon.gifCapture 8_23_2020 5_32_32 AMc8.jpg

Wow! Those are great pics of the Angry Red Planet!


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#6313 rcwolpert

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Posted 23 August 2020 - 04:22 PM

Very nice!



#6314 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 23 August 2020 - 06:30 PM

Here is tonight's set up.... 30 year old FC-100  on EM 10   Finally getting around to figuring out this Revolution Imager   Grabbed it used as a neat way to let folks look at the Comet   Jupiter Saturn  with an    eye  towards  letting folks especially children look without grabbing the eyepiece  and general Covid precautions....We shall see if I can get it running....

 

Ready to switch to good eyepieces  at the ready    So far I have observed the daytime moon with several eyepieces but now waiting for Darkness on the edge of town

 

P.S.   I am looking into observing chairs           well      No that is not my observing chair 

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#6315 oldmanastro

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Posted 23 August 2020 - 06:43 PM

Here is tonight's set up.... 30 year old FC-100  on EM 10   Finally getting around to figuring out this Revolution Imager   Grabbed it used as a neat way to let folks look at the Comet   Jupiter Saturn  with an    eye  towards  letting folks especially children look without grabbing the eyepiece  and general Covid precautions....We shall see if I can get it running....

 

Ready to switch to good eyepieces  at the ready    So far I have observed the daytime moon with several eyepieces but now waiting for Darkness on the edge of town

 

P.S.   I am looking into observing chairs           well      No that is not my observing chair 

Looks like a nice comfortable set up. That FC-100 refractor exudes quality. 

 

Guido


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#6316 Terra Nova

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 11:15 AM

Last night the transparency wasn’t all that great and after playing bocci ball for a couple of hours in the afternoon and then taking an evening walk, I wasn’t in much of a mood for dragging out a telescope. Only 2nd magnitude stars were visible, and it took a while for Saturn to appear through the gunk, yet Jupe was shining brightly and by the time I returned from my neighborhood, both planets beckoned. I had my little Mayflower model 814 set up in the dining room and ready to go and so I figured, what the heck, the little scope always puts me in my happy place, it’s an easy drag-out, I might as well. The day had cooled down and I was more in the mood to stay outside than plop down in front of the TV. Plenty of time to do that when winter comes.

 

My little Mayflower (60mm x 700mm) and I will be having our fifty-five year anniversary in October and it has undergone a number of upgrades and improvements over the years. It’s currently set up for 1.25” eyepieces, has a much better (and bigger) finder than originally, and has rings and a Vixen rail and it was already on my Vixen Porta II mount. I put a very good, tried and true Celestron 94115-A prism star diagonal in it’s 1.25” Vixen back, and grabbed a small set of Plossl eyepieces (TeleVue 20mm, Meade (Japan) 4000 9.7mm, Carton 8mm, and an old Meade 4000 6.4mm smoothie. I figured this would give me a nice basic range from 35X to just over 100X. I also took out a small set of planetary filters well suited to the small 60mm objective, (light yellow #12, light blue #80A, light green #56, and orange #21). The telescope and it’s mount came out to the deck through the kitchen door in one trip, my observing stool And the small box of eyepieces and filters in another.

 

As soon as I sighted in on Jupiter in the finder and then looked thru the telescope with my 20mm TV Plossl, I knew I was not going to be disappointed in my decision to observe, and that it was going to be a very fine night. Old Jove was gorgeous! At 35X, the bands were distinct, four moons visible and I could see Io on the western limb, just emerging from a transit. I plopped in the 9.7mm Meade and I could see the tiny dot of Io’s shadow, still cast down on the disk. Io was just a smidge away from the limb, and was a distinct disk of a distinctly deep yellow, sulfurous hue. I pulled out the 9.7mm eyepiece and dropped in the Carton 8mm. The atmosphere was still and stable and the haze was merely acting like a light filter. Seeing was very good despite the poorish transparency. I could now make out slight changes in width, shape, and color on the NEB and SEB. Io’s shadow was a very distinct circular black dot. I could make out northern and southern temperate belting, which was hinting at several distinct narrow bands in each hemisphere. And each of the four Galilean satellites could be made out as distinct circular disks of slightly different color. I kicked the power up to just over 100X with my old 6.4mm Meade 4000 smoothie. The image held beautifully, and even more detail appeared in the belting, although the difference in change of what I could  see between the 8mm (87.5X) and the 6.4mm (109X) told me that I was rapidly approaching the magnification of diminishing returns.

 

It was time to try out the filters. I took out my light blue filter and screwed it into the 20mm eyepiece. The increase in contrast of the bands against the lighter Jovian atmosphere was even more stark. With this filter, I cycled through all four eyepieces and more delicate banding appeared in the northern and southern temperate regions became more apparent. I did the same with the light green filter and noticed a similar effect, tho the blue filter produced more natural images that were more pleasing to the eye. Next, I tried the light yellow filter. I noticed no gain until I got up to the 8mm and 6.4mm eyepieces, and not I could make out festoons along the edges of the equatorial belts. The orange filter also seemed to accentuate this effect, tho with too much darkening and shifting toward unnatural color. My best views were with the 8mm Carton which is an exceptionally fine Plossl eyepiece (thank you Sheldon F.!) and the old 6.4mm Meade smoothie, and the light blue and light yellow filters with the edge going to the 8mm Plossl and the light blue filter. I observed Jupiter for over an hour before moving on to Saturn, and while doing so, I sat both mesmerized and confounded by the stunning optical performance my old Mayflower telescope yielded. The scope, (by APL), has always rendered very good views, but tonight, it was just exceptional.
 

Next, I turned my attention to the planet named for the Roman god who was the Harvester of Time. The planet of the God of the Scythe has always been a favorite! The first time I really observed Saturn was in October of 1965 with this very telescope! My first view was through the included little 0.965” Ramsden 20mm eyepiece, and I wanted to more or less replicate the view last night, so like with Jupiter, I began with the 20mm TeleVue Plossl. Saturn was beautiful, eternal really! To me, if Jupiter is majestic, the Saturn is eternal. Those adjectives best describe those two great and regal Gas Giants for me. There is a more subtile, delicate, enduring beauty to Saturn in contrast to the stark, dynamic and forceful Jupiter. And last night Saturn was simply stunning. The rings were sharply delineated, the more subtle atmospheric bands more than just suggested at 35X. As I cycled through the eyepieces, the images held and became more detailed. With the 9.7mm (72X) the Cassini Division was black and sharp, etched along the entire ring structure, the atmospheric bands, a much more delicate brown or tan quite apparent, and at 87.5X with the 8mm three moons were visible. Subtle increases in planetary detail were observed at just over 100X. The light blue filter seemed to bring out the whiter areas while the rings were a bit more enhanced with the yellow filter.

 

I’m very glad that I went out last night with my old telescope. It was two hours well spent. It once again affirmed to me just how much one can see with a small telescope. And once again, I was assured as to just how good the objective lens is in the little Mayflower. Especially when equipped with quality 1.25” eyepieces. The scope performed at a level I expect to see with my Zeiss and Takahashi refractors. And once again, the value of observing at magnifications that yield exit pupils no smaller than 0.5mm was apparent when conjoined with good glass, good seeing, and a little patience.

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#6317 oldmanastro

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 01:06 PM

That was a great observing report Terra.  The Mayflower optical quality is excellent judging by the details observed in both planets. It looks majestic in that altazimuth mount. The first time I observed Saturn was in 1966 well before the rings went edgewise later that year. I was using my 60mm f/11 Sears (Towa). It was in the early morning hours, about 4:00am. I was astounded by the view.

 

Here we are having tropical storms and now a tropical wave bringing rain and more rain. Hopefully things will improve tomorrow.

 

Guido


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#6318 steve t

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 01:07 PM

Terra - Great report thanks for sharing.

The light blue filter you used was it a #80 or #82a? On Jupiter I've had good results with the #82a on my 4" Newtonian, but have been considering getting a #80 to see if I could get a little more detail.

Steve T 


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#6319 Terra Nova

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 01:16 PM

Terra - Great report thanks for sharing.

The light blue filter you used was it a #80 or #82a? On Jupiter I've had good results with the #82a on my 4" Newtonian, but have been considering getting a #80 to see if I could get a little more detail.

Steve T 

Hi Steve, It’s an 80A. To me it’s light blue because it’s lighter than my other two blue filters, but technically it’s Medium Blue by proper color name. Sorry for the confusion.


Edited by Terra Nova, 24 August 2020 - 01:19 PM.


#6320 steve t

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 01:37 PM

Hi Steve, It’s an 80A. To me it’s light blue because it’s lighter than my other two blue filters, but technically it’s Medium Blue by proper color name. Sorry for the confusion.

No apologies neededlol.gif  I was just curious. I've reduced my filter collection to just three (Magenta, #82a Light Blue, and a Questar UHC filter) and was wondering  if a #80 would be a better fit.

Steve T


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#6321 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 02:47 PM

Terra 

 

 nice report        yes sometimes it is the anticipation of a drag      to drag out and set up a good sized scope when one has already done a lot  and the summer heat in on and we think the seeing is questionable . Nothing like a grab and go  at the ready  all set up and looking cute in the    family room living room  what have you

 

Now The Mayflower is sweet. I love mine although I have had but a year. I did the 14.00 dollar 1.25 Vixen instant visual back  easy screw on as well.  Great optics in a small package she is. ....

 

So I did not fair as well     Jupiter seemed in and out of the haze   some almost  good views then

Mush....tease., then     more  lousy seeing   .(and the Revolution imager needs more practice it has to be my inexperience)  Maybe if I did not set up the big FC-100 on the tracking mount the seeing might have been better?


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 24 August 2020 - 04:32 PM.

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#6322 Terra Nova

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 03:52 PM

No apologies neededlol.gif  I was just curious. I've reduced my filter collection to just three (Magenta, #82a Light Blue, and a Questar UHC filter) and was wondering  if a #80 would be a better fit.

Steve T

Steve, I also have an 82A in my Questar Brandon Set of threaded filters. I find it a very useful planetary filter with small telescopes.



#6323 steve t

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 04:24 PM

Thanks Terra

Steve


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#6324 Alanvogt

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 11:11 PM

Have been sailing in Washington's San Juan Islands for 2 weeks now. Tonight is clear so I've been observing the moon, Jupiter and Saturn through my 7x50 marine Fujinon binoculars. Not exactly classic but I have had them for over 25 years. The optics are superb.  Moon was great as always, Jupiters moons very easy to see, but could not quite make out Saturn's rings. The skies here are quite dark so in an hour I'll lay in the cockpit and take in the Milky Way.

Blue Fin.jpg

Fujinon.jpg

Update: The Milky Way was spectacular.


Edited by Alanvogt, 25 August 2020 - 11:37 AM.

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#6325 wfj

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 11:40 PM

Orange Tube C90 with 7.4mm - 22mm GTO Zoom at 7.4. 5-stripe Jupiter with GRS on preceding limb, Saturn with Cassini division, Moon waxing crescent.

 

All filtered by smoke from CZU lightning complex fire, where I was evacuated from my house last Thursday (am in a hotel observing from it parking lot, in between CZU and SCU fires). Tried M22 but still extinguished by smoke and Santa Clara light dome.

 

Last observing for a while - tomorrow surgery, and post-op recovery 5lb limit on lifting for a month ... thus the C90 on camera tripod.


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