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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#6451 John Higbee

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Posted 14 September 2020 - 10:15 PM

Mount Wilson Observatory - view to the east shows the approaching fire.

 

http://hpwren.ucsd.e...-e-mobo-c.html 

 

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#6452 PawPaw

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 10:13 AM

Your Edmund 4-1/4" is a excellent choice as I'm sure you are well aware.

I'm starting to have my C8 dew up on me. I leave the dew shield off because the scope

equalizes faster without it.

I can put the warmer dew shield on and it clears the corrector pretty quick but the writing

is on the wall 'it's newt time' the Newtonian is dew resistant. And completely color free

which is nice.

 

Robert

Well just Dew it!  Robert you called that one.....the 4.25" outlasted the 3"  no sweat.....or should I say Dew? 

 

There were nice views early and then ground fog started to set in from the south.  You could see the fog starting out several hundred feet above the ground and slowly settling.  The north half of the sky remained clear enough for observations.  I was able to get both Edmunds on Saturn and Jupiter before seeing degraded and both provided splendid views.  Both are spot on in collimation and Cassinni  division plus shaded banding on the surface was evident on Saturn.  Jupiter, while no GRS,  also showed crisp detail for about 20 minutes then both slowly started to fade away.  At first I thought both had fogged up but when I looked up they were slowly losing magnitude.  I had the 4.25 setup on the Heavy duty mount with the small tripod and the clock drive.  I forgot how handy Edmunds "Manual compensating lever" is on their drives.  

 

I ended the session with a couple of star tests...Vega and Deneb.....Both were very nice both in and out and while in Lyrae I tested both out on epsilon lyrae both scopes split both doubles with the 15mm RKE.  

 

So 2 hours into the session and the 3 inch refractor tube looked like it had been rained on.  I had to wipe it off just to make sure it did not slip carrying  in.  I moved it to our porch to slowly equalize, the objective had fogged even with the dew shield.  I used my air puffer to help the process.  Even the tube on the 4.25 while cold and damp had very little dew on it.    The mirror looked good until I brought it inside and then just a fog that cleared after 15 min.  Pic of the dew on the 3 inch and what the atmosphere looked like this morning.

 

Don

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Edited by PawPaw, 15 September 2020 - 10:14 AM.

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#6453 highfnum

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 11:25 AM

jaeger 6 inch f10 +1.5 barlow  baader semi apo filter 

seeing below par but i tried anyway

Capture 9_15_2020 5_14_32 AMj6ag.jpg

Capture 9_15_2020 5_25_49 AMjag6apo.jpg

 


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#6454 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 11:33 AM

just went outside - the sky is featureless.  John

It’s even worse today than it was yesterday here in the Ohio Valley!


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#6455 John Higbee

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 12:13 PM

Slate gray in NoVA today, with a hazy sun being the only thing that "breaks through"!  John



#6456 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 12:33 PM

Slate gray in NoVA today, with a hazy sun being the only thing that "breaks through"!  John

Sounds just like here. I thing we are supposed to have a strong cold front push thru and a Canadian air mass move in over the weekend after the remnants of Sally, and push this mess to the south and east. 


Edited by Terra Nova, 15 September 2020 - 12:34 PM.

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#6457 steve t

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 12:34 PM

It’s even worse today than it was yesterday here in the Ohio Valley!

I was just driving home from Greenville, OH and noticed how hazy the skies looked.


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#6458 Pete W

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 12:40 PM

The extend of the smoke is astounding...one coast to the other.

 

http://weather.rap.u...e=-1&duration=2

 


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#6459 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 03:06 PM

“Smoke from California wildfires reaches Europe and East Coast”- LA Times

 

https://www.latimes....st-coast-europe



#6460 Kasmos

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 03:44 PM

In the southbay of LA the days have been very hazy with sort of white-out conditions but they've been slowly getting a little better each day. There's much less noticable orange cast to the sunlight, especially when it's higher in the sky. The nights have been a bit foggy with marine moisture that hurts the vsibility as well. Last night I didn't see any stars but could easily see Jupiter and find Saturn. Late while taking out the trash, I could see Mars as well. I may set up a scope and see how things look tonight.


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#6461 Garyth64

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 06:43 PM

I was away from the house before the Sun went down.  It hung like an orange ball in the sky.  It didn't hurt my eyes to look at it.  If I had binos with me, I would have been tempted to take a peek.  Today, and the last couple of days, we've had really hazy skies.


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#6462 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 08:57 PM

Saw the sun this morning      still cautious  but needed no sliver polymer     

 tonight  after teaching my ethics class    no clouds no moon     still      no dice      no transparency  no desire to expose my 63 year old classic self or old classic scopes to this xxx stuff          just for poor seeing 

  good days to work on mounts  and stuff     what are you  protecting / observing?


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 15 September 2020 - 09:10 PM.

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#6463 highfnum

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Posted 16 September 2020 - 05:31 AM

was on hunt for uranus but failed 

so i was about to pack up 

i decided to try mars 

got these with orange tube c8

Capture 9_16_2020 5_49_28 AMc8ir.jpg

 

Capture 9_16_2020 5_50_32 AMc8ir.jpg


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#6464 Corcaroli78

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Posted 16 September 2020 - 09:01 AM

Hi Forum!

 

I had a nice session observing Mars with the Telementor. At 210x, Mars was a well defined disc with some barely noticeable features on the surface. 

 

I was my first serious observation of Mars in more than 15 years, and i can say that until now this is by far the best view that i have experiences with my own equipment, Happy to see how the Telementor performs!!!

 

Clear skies!

Carlos


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#6465 steve t

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Posted 16 September 2020 - 12:35 PM

Over the last few days I've mainly been observing the sun in white light. 

Although I've read that the sun has formally entered Cycle 25, over the last few days there hasn't been much activity.


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#6466 Bomber Bob

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Posted 16 September 2020 - 02:13 PM

Gee...  I wonder why the seeing is so bad?

 

Hurricane Sally S01 - 1900Z 20200916.jpg



#6467 Kasmos

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Posted 16 September 2020 - 04:11 PM

Saw the sun this morning      still cautious  but needed no sliver polymer     

 tonight  after teaching my ethics class    no clouds no moon     still      no dice      no transparency  no desire to expose my 63 year old classic self or old classic scopes to this xxx stuff          just for poor seeing 

  good days to work on mounts  and stuff     what are you  protecting / observing?

What xxx stuff?

 

Still hazy but with no noticeble ash falling, last night I did about 20 minutes of Jupiter and Saturn observing using the Celestron C60 on a Unitron mount. Our typical onshore winds were a bit strong at 8:00-8:30 pm so that was the main reason to call it quits. Had a few moments that were OK but it was nice just to see them again. 

 

While it appears that most of LA has terrible smoke, being only about 1 mile from the shoreline I'm much better off. Today the sky is again a bit less hazy with a little blue near the zenith. The sunlight that enters the house from any gaps in window shades no longer has a noticeble orange tint. 

 

fingerscrossed.gif Hopefully I'll do more observing tonight. 


Edited by Kasmos, 16 September 2020 - 04:12 PM.

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#6468 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 16 September 2020 - 09:34 PM

 Well no ash here  just high altitude something           just frustration   sorry  just had no reason to be out there

  sky has not been blue in days      i can see Mars tonight but not bringing out a scope 

   Glad your situation is improving


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#6469 Pete W

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Posted 16 September 2020 - 09:41 PM

Had a weird experience tonight.  Walked out around 930 and saw Jupiter clear and bold, but something was wrong...it’s raining!  Clear to the south but raining!  Oh well, no observing tonight.


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#6470 Terra Nova

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 08:28 AM

I woke up to a really pee-souper of fog this morning!


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#6471 oldmanastro

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 09:35 AM

There was a clear night on the 15. It was not only clear but rarely transparent for this time of the year. I took out the Celestar 8 just to see the planets. After the usual hassle of polar aligning the wedgepod, I had Jupiter on the FOV with the 26mm original Celestron Plossl. The GRS was in transit and I could see many details on the belts. A 2X Ultima Barlow coupled to a 15mm Plossl brought the details forward . On moments of excellent seeing details in the belts were overwhelming with even a small central darker area observed inside the greatly reduced GRS. Later on, a very nice transit of Io and its shadow across the planet was observed.

 

By the time I got to Saturn it was still beyond the area of the sky just above the second floor roof where heat turbulence disturbs the seeing. I had one of my best Saturn observing sessions ever. Using the Ultima 2X Barlow and a 9mm Plossl (444x) the planet was crisp and clear and I could see not only the Cassini division all around the planet but the Encke division in the ansae. I don't remember ever seeing the Encke division so clearly. In addition, about three belts could be discerned on the planet disc. I spent a long time on this observation. It was my best visual view of Saturn ever. Maybe except the first time I saw it with the 60mm refractor 54 years ago. The observation also attested to the excellent optics of this Celestar 8. 

 

If Saturn was this good Mars would be nice as well. It was. After the planet climbed above 45 degrees from the horizon I placed it in the FOV at 266x. The little polar cap stood out and right there, the eye of mars was looking back. At 444x the image was just as good. A Wratten 15 yellow filter enhanced the details further. Only momentary turbulence disturbed this view. The old Celestar 8 with wedgepod looks a bit battered and when I rescued it, there was a need for cleaning everything, centering and collimating the corrector plus repairing the stuck clock drive motor. All that work paid off on the night of the 15.

 

Yesterday it was a different story. A grab and go night with intermittent clouds and haze from the usual suspect. The seeing was not bad though. I took the Sears 60mm f/15 (6305) out. Just picked up the whole thing and placed it in the observing spot. A new 1.25" to .965" diagonal was tested and proved to be very good. Jupiter was very nice at 150x showing the belts clearly and a dark area on the NEB that looked like a barge. I brought it up to 225x with the 4mm UO ortho and the image was holding. When I got to Saturn it was already on top of the second floor roof and under the effects of heat induced turbulence.  Then I had to wait quite a bit for some clouds to clear mars. The haze diminished the glare from the planet and it came right to focus at 150x. The Towa was showing the little polar cap and the dark areas clearly. They were still there at 225x. I spent sometime observing mars while hand guiding the 6305 with original mount. It was a short but satisfying session with the 50+ years old Towa. Here it is looking at Jupiter.

 

 

 

 

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#6472 dusty99

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 10:13 AM

Looks like Mt. Wilson might be safe for now: https://www.npr.org/...son-observatory

 

Back on topic, I had the 4” Unitron out a couple of nights ago on the Berlebach Uni 28 (in “lite” mode - the guide scope stayed in the box).  Although the LX70 looks small underneath 5+ feet of scope, it was OK as long as I handled focusing and slo-mo corrections gently.  I spent about an hour with higher targets (Izar; Cat’s Eye nebula, Double Double), then thought I’d pull out my SW120, too.  
 

1EAF8D11 EB76 4CDD A308 BE0FC38A2C44

 


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#6473 John Higbee

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 05:33 PM

Sounds just like here. I thing we are supposed to have a strong cold front push thru and a Canadian air mass move in over the weekend after the remnants of Sally, and push this mess to the south and east.

Looked at the "smoke forecast" and it looks like the front/Sally in tandem are going to move the plume significantly to the south by Monday afternoon.  Plume is not forecast to return through Tuesday evening.  John



#6474 John Higbee

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 05:35 PM

There was a clear night on the 15. It was not only clear but rarely transparent for this time of the year. I took out the Celestar 8 just to see the planets. After the usual hassle of polar aligning the wedgepod, I had Jupiter on the FOV with the 26mm original Celestron Plossl. The GRS was in transit and I could see many details on the belts. A 2X Ultima Barlow coupled to a 15mm Plossl brought the details forward . On moments of excellent seeing details in the belts were overwhelming with even a small central darker area observed inside the greatly reduced GRS. Later on, a very nice transit of Io and its shadow across the planet was observed.

 

By the time I got to Saturn it was still beyond the area of the sky just above the second floor roof where heat turbulence disturbs the seeing. I had one of my best Saturn observing sessions ever. Using the Ultima 2X Barlow and a 9mm Plossl (444x) the planet was crisp and clear and I could see not only the Cassini division all around the planet but the Encke division in the ansae. I don't remember ever seeing the Encke division so clearly. In addition, about three belts could be discerned on the planet disc. I spent a long time on this observation. It was my best visual view of Saturn ever. Maybe except the first time I saw it with the 60mm refractor 54 years ago. The observation also attested to the excellent optics of this Celestar 8. 

 

If Saturn was this good Mars would be nice as well. It was. After the planet climbed above 45 degrees from the horizon I placed it in the FOV at 266x. The little polar cap stood out and right there, the eye of mars was looking back. At 444x the image was just as good. A Wratten 15 yellow filter enhanced the details further. Only momentary turbulence disturbed this view. The old Celestar 8 with wedgepod looks a bit battered and when I rescued it, there was a need for cleaning everything, centering and collimating the corrector plus repairing the stuck clock drive motor. All that work paid off on the night of the 15.

 

Yesterday it was a different story. A grab and go night with intermittent clouds and haze from the usual suspect. The seeing was not bad though. I took the Sears 60mm f/15 (6305) out. Just picked up the whole thing and placed it in the observing spot. A new 1.25" to .965" diagonal was tested and proved to be very good. Jupiter was very nice at 150x showing the belts clearly and a dark area on the NEB that looked like a barge. I brought it up to 225x with the 4mm UO ortho and the image was holding. When I got to Saturn it was already on top of the second floor roof and under the effects of heat induced turbulence.  Then I had to wait quite a bit for some clouds to clear mars. The haze diminished the glare from the planet and it came right to focus at 150x. The Towa was showing the little polar cap and the dark areas clearly. They were still there at 225x. I spent sometime observing mars while hand guiding the 6305 with original mount. It was a short but satisfying session with the 50+ years old Towa. Here it is looking at Jupiter.

I have an identical Towa 305 in silver paint (60mmX900mm) - what a great scope!


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#6475 Kasmos

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 07:26 PM

It might be hard to beleive this is South West Torrance today. (yes the same Torrance you all know)

This morning had high clouds with blue areas of sky with no noticeble orange tint.

The onshore winds are really cleaning things out in my corner of the city.

These taken at about 4:30 pm.

Sky-1.jpg

This is looking east from my back/side yard

 

Sky-2.jpg

This is from the school just a few hundred feet up the street east of me.

The smoke is more noticeble but not that bad in this Northern (slightly Northwest), direction.

On a clear day you'd normaly see the Santa Monica Mts along the horizon and the Hollywood Hills to the right

 

I suppose conditions could change, but I really hadn't expected to see a day like this anytime soon.

Think I'll try observing tonight! smile.png


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