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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#7001 ccwemyss

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Posted 29 December 2020 - 10:56 PM

Entire evening with the 6"f9. Started out tweaking cone error on Polaris, then went to the conjunction for a nice view, albeit through a bare tree, then Alberio, which was beautiful.

 

After dinner, I was testing out the pointing accuracy of the new mount, slewing to many different stars. Rigel, Alnitak, Alnilam, Betegeuse, Bellatrix, Aldebaran, Atlas, Capella, Castor, Pollux, Procyon, Sirius, Dubhe, Deneb, Sadr, Algol, Alpheratz, Algenib, Markab, Scheat, Almach, some multiple times.

 

Performance varied a bit. Going around Pegasus, for example, I was seeing errors of about 3 minutes, but it would come back to within seconds of the original star in the tour. Going from Aldebaran to Betelgeuse was off by about 2' but nearly 5' for Rigel and 8' for Sirius. The refraction difference for the temperature and pressure tonight should have only been about 2.6' between Aldebaran and Sirius. Syncing on Pollux and going to Dubhe, even though not a meridian flip, was more like 20' of error. On a long meridian flip, from Alpheratz to Alnitak, it was about 33'.  If it's within 28', I can find it in the 19mm Panoptic, so I'm hoping to get it within that range. My drift alignment is now good for about 20 minutes in azimuth and 10 minutes in altitude, so perhaps I need to tweak the altitude some more.

 

Mars had some nice detail, Almach was lovely, Castor also nicely split. Did not really look for the pup on Sirius. M31 was a smudge, and M42 showed barely any nebulosity. Could easily see the E component of the trap, but wasn't able to consistently pull out the F.  Although the moon was full, I was struck by the amount of detail visible. 

 

Called it quits around 10PM with the thermometer reading 20*. The dog was patiently waiting for me up by the house. She loves the cold, and had to run all around as soon as I got to her. 

 

Chip W. 


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#7002 oldmanastro

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Posted 30 December 2020 - 09:49 AM

Broken clouds coming straight from the north were present since early evening yesterday. By 8:00pm there were few and very sparse. There was some breeze that made the 73F temperature feel a little cooler. The Cold Full Moon precluded any attempt at DSOs. I wanted an image of this "Cold Moon". I took my favorite quick setup grab and go telescope, the now 21 years old ETX90EC. Even with a .5X focal reducer I could not accommodate the full moon in the camera field. The 20 years old ETX60 refractor, saved from oblivion years ago, came to the rescue and finally a image of the "Cold Moon" was taken.

 

Afterwards, some double star hopping with the ETX90 was done around Orion. I went through the same doubles that were observed with the Questar just a few days ago. They included 52 orionis , sigma orionis, Rigel, the Trapezium,eta orionis, and rho orionis. The 90mm Mak proved again that it is a very capable telescope. If Meade had provided a better finder and mount the whole telescope would have been a gem, not just the optical tube assembly. The full moon, light pollution and broken clouds were not providing a nice environment for observation. I decided to pick things up at about 10:30pm.  


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#7003 Bomber Bob

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Posted 03 January 2021 - 04:52 PM

Gonna be COLD at The Swamp tonight, but I'm looking forward to a Double "M" Challenge for my Meade 826:  Mars right at 10" and M33, and both near the meridian.  I've seen Triangulum in the 80mm F5 RFT that's now on the 826.  For insurance, I'll have the Triple Nickle outside, too -- got a good view of the galaxy at 20x with a 2" Erfle 32mm in this 5" F5 RFT.  [And, just to be for-sure-for-sure, I have my Selsi 20x60 Binos waiting in the shed.  Grabbed M33 with these shortly after I got them from the GW auction.]

 

I've been cloud-watching all afternoon.  I think the last streamers from the front will be gone by 2000L (02Z) -- got my fingers & toes crossed...

 

[CHAZ, thanks again for this hand-me-down.  It ain't as pretty as Jim Vice's Cave 8" F7, but it could easily pace it for the views.]

 

Started with Mars @ 1700L, and spent almost an hour picking out details at 300x (Radian 4) in 8/10 seeing.  "Mickey Mouse" ears at 100x / 200x resolved to Sirenum.  Boreum was almost as dark / prominent.  Tried 400x, but upper air frustrated those views -- very infrequent moments of calm.  Came back out ~ 1900L after dinner, and... Poof! It was gone -- Mars barely gleamed through a broken layer of River Smog.  Tuesday night may be my next shot at fuzzies...


Edited by Bomber Bob, 04 January 2021 - 08:02 AM.

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#7004 EricTheBlack

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Posted 04 January 2021 - 02:10 PM

Caught a glimpse of Uranus through the old (still new to me) C8 somewhere around midnight MST. Found Mars by eyeball then used the dials to move over to the former as the scope was finderless until the mail came today! There is something quite satisfying about going about things the hard way..


Edited by EricTheBlack, 05 January 2021 - 02:12 AM.

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#7005 ccwemyss

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Posted 04 January 2021 - 10:19 PM

Got out the Edmund 4001-based project scope (I have to come up with a better name for it) and put it on a CGEM-DX that I have for outreach. Collimated it at 250X, and tested it out on a few objects. Even though the mount is on a Losmandy tripod, which lowers it by about a foot from the native tripod, it' still quite tall. I had to stand on a chair to get to the eyepiece in several positions. 

 

Resolved the E and F components of the trap very nicely. Saw some good detail on Mars, although the seeing wasn't the most steady. With the 41 Panoptic, the Pleiades cover just over half of the field. M31, 32 and 110 all fit easily in the central portion of the view. Clouds rolled in about then, and the temp had dropped to 25*F, so I packed it in an covered the mount. 

 

I think this will be my best bet for seeing the triple conjunction on the 10th, if skies allow it. 

 

Chip W. 


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#7006 Bomber Bob

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Posted 05 January 2021 - 07:53 AM

Streaking thin layer at mid-levels last night, so none but the brightest fuzzies in the C102Triple Nickle.  Had to re-calibrate my eyeballs for Mars after using the 826 the previous night.  A Red Planet for sure in the achromatic, and tough to break up the markings compared with the 8" Newt, but sharp @ 200x (Nagler 5).

 

I did try to nab M33 after dinner when the skies were a bit clearer.  First, with my Selsi 20x60's... nope!  The pesky layer diminished M31, and shrouded M33.  I did get a hint of something in the TN5, but it took switching from a 2" Edmund 32mm Erfle to the 1.25" RKE 21mm (30x) to catch a shape slightly brighter than the background... too bad!

 

Spent the rest of the time comparing the views of clusters & doubles between the 4" F10 & 5" F5 refractors.  The RFT had no trouble resolving M37 @ 80x (Brandon 8); tried a bunch of eyepieces in the C102, but couldn't get past that hint of nebulosity (from the unresolved micro-dots) -- inaccurate, but very pretty!


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#7007 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 05 January 2021 - 03:06 PM

 Well I have had some unplanned free time  in the last week that I was not hoping for. It did make for a good night observing a few days ago. I used the Vixen 80fl    and then the  NP 101 for wide field viewing….Using an old wide TV 32  then the Silvertop 26   and then the Delite 18.2  I enjoyed the views of M 42  and Orion in general and then the Pleiades. It never gets old. Very nice     but   

 

     We have been in quarantine here due to an unfortunate exposure of my wife and daughter to a friend who called  to say  "ut oh  I am Covid positive."   Swell.....That afternoon,actually it was New Year's eve,  we did the what I called panic testing and results finally came   Negative. Knowing the test was too close to the exposure the obligatory second test was really important.....Yesterday morning  we went to Yale New Haven and did the pcr test    results  by 9.30 p.m   Negative for us all.....Probably this good result was attributed my daughter insisting on staying by an open door. She has a six month old son...Yes Oliver is my first grandchild    It was  a big relief

    So  no more ... no more ...visits not even for a friend . I know most folks here are staying vigilant...    Don't ever feel sheepish or apologize  for hunkering down and strictly following your own set of rules......so it is cloudy again and I can live with that....


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 05 January 2021 - 03:08 PM.

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#7008 Pete W

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Posted 05 January 2021 - 03:50 PM

Yikes.  Glad to hear that the family is healthy.    It is satisfying that we can still enjoy our hobby even during these surreal times.  Stargazing and social distancing go hand-in-hand.  


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#7009 steve t

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Posted 05 January 2021 - 04:11 PM

Like does not mean like.

Glad to hear your family is healthy.


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#7010 Pete W

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Posted 05 January 2021 - 04:19 PM

Two nights ago I had the Sears 6339a riding the Giro alt az out at our dark sky site.  Seeing was very soft but transparency was quite high; was able to glimpse M33 naked eye.   Temps stayed in the 40's so it was almost comfortable.    Arrived without a plan so it took some time to settle in.  First hopped around open clusters in Cas.  Started at NGC7789 (Caroline's cluster) which is fine with the 15mm Ultrascopic.  Tracked down a few more within the "W".

 

Then headed south to Fornax.  Most of the evening was spent in the Fornax Galaxy Cluster.  I'm familiar with this group thru the 18" and was pleasantly surprised by how easy the brighter members of the group were in the 3".  Started at NGC1316 (Fornax A).  Very bright and obvious with a hint of a stellar nucleus in the 15mm.  Then tracked down the "Z" NGC1365.  Much fainter but a roundish glow was detectable with averted vision.  NGC's 1399 and 1404 were both surprisingly obvious, with 1399 being bigger and brighter of the two.   NGC 1380 just to the north of 1399 was the next most visible.  NGC's 1427 and 1386 were detected but quite faint.    

 

 

While still south I headed to Columba to the bright glob NGC 1851.  Smallish with a bright center in the 15mm; reminiscent of a smaller, fainter M15.   Two brightish galaxies are in Columba: NGC1792 and 1808.  Tried both with the 20mm RG erfle without clear success, but with the 15mm Ultrascopic both popped out and were distinct with AV.  Both were ovalish with NGC1792 being a bit brighter.    Headed north into Lepus to try the Herschel 400 galaxy NGC1964 but had no luck with it.  Stopped by M79 - looked a bit smaller than NGC1851.  

 

Ended the evening hopping between familiar objects.  With the 28mm RG ortho M42 was stunning, particularly due to the dark nebulosity.  M37 is a must-see in the refractors - a perfect cluster for these scopes.  I believe the last item tracked down was NGC2403 in Cam.  Easy and odd looking with the multiple stars involved with the glow.    


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#7011 davidmcgo

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Posted 05 January 2021 - 08:46 PM

Close call but good advice to share.  My wife is an RN in the COVID unit at her hospital and finally gets the 2nd vaccine dose in a few days.  Been holding my breath since March hoping she’d stay clear.

 

Dave


Edited by davidmcgo, 05 January 2021 - 08:56 PM.

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#7012 Bomber Bob

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Posted 05 January 2021 - 10:14 PM

Just came in from a FUN session with my Meade 826 System -- 8" F6 Newt + 80mm F5 Frac.  DSO seeing 8+...

 

Finally!  M33... easier to see in the 80mm than the 200mm.  Maybe 1/3 the size of M31, but MUCH fainter / lower contrast -- like looking at light gray against a medium gray background.  Started the 826 @ 30x with a PL 40mm... couldn't see M33 at all.  WITW?!  I could see it in the 80mm...  Switched to RKE 28mm (43x), and could just see it with averted vision.  A win, but not a WIN!!  Especially when I could see dust lanes in M31 @ 150x with the RKE 8...

 

NGC 2158... Mama!  At 60x, got M35 & 2158 in the same field, though 2158 looked like a tiny nebula with maybe 4 faint stars blinking in & out.  But... again at 150x with the RKE 8, and 2158 was a partially-resolved small dim globular.  The Bonus was the glorious interior of M35 itself.  Truly, beyond words.

 

Navigating with Newts is still new to me.  Y'all should've seen me trying to star-hop around Auriga-Taurus...  Luckily, when I adapted that Meade 60mm Polar Finder's diagonal to the 80mm, it has 2 circles on the reticle, and the inner one just about matches the 826's field with the RKE 28mm.  Still managed to move the wrong way a bunch of times...

 

At some point, the "new-ness" will wear off, but...  I'm amazed at what 2 mirrors in a cardboard tube can do:  Planets, fuzzies, clusters, & doubles.  Same capabilities as that APM 152ED, but in a very different package.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 06 January 2021 - 09:44 AM.

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#7013 oldmanastro

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Posted 06 January 2021 - 10:28 AM

Finally a clear and transparent night with just one glitch, a 95% humidity. Under these conditions I decided against any catadioptric telescope. The resilient Sears 2535 76mm f/16 was out on its original mount and wooden tripod. The constellation Lepus was the first target. Three variables, R, T and X Leporis were observed and estimated. R Leporis is always a fascinating star to observe. The deep red color is more prominent in Newtonians and Catadioptrics than in the 76mm refractor. At least that;s my impression. It was bright red and near its maxima. The variables took some time to locate using the AAVSO charts and old fashioned star hopping. It's fun anyway.

 

After the last variable M79 was visited. The globular cluster was a bit dimmer than I would have expected. The lenses were already fogging up. I went to Kappa Leporis. The double was split at 200x without difficulty. B Leporis was a no go. Dew had covered the lenses completely and I did not want to repeat the experience that I had with this telescope back in 1967. I left it outside while taking a break from observing, the lenses dewed up so much that water condensed and sipped between the lens elements. The rest is a horror story that I don't want to recount. The 76mm was taken inside with a wet optical tube. I had to dry it with a towel. The rest was left to dry on its own. 

 

You must think that this ended my observing yesterday. No, I took the Sears 6305 60mm f/15 out and continued to observe . This time I went to check on the Orion doubles with this telescope but it was a short session. I managed to observe Eta Origins, the Trapezium and as I observed Rigel the objective lens dewed up. I called it a night. The humidity is supposed to diminish today. I hope the transparency is as good as it was yesterday. The lenses were left uncapped all night to make sure that the humidity was eliminated. My observing table was drenched, the Norton's had to be left open to dry and the same went for the eyepiece box. The tropics in winter.


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#7014 Barnsey123

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Posted 08 January 2021 - 06:34 AM

The Moon, Christmas Eve 2020, Stourbridge UK

 

Used the RAO R77 3" refractor on a HEQ5/Pro and a GtVision 3EY5 microscope camera (no barlow).   I really like this combo as there is less glare (as compared to my 4" Altair ED F7 refractor) and virtually no CA.  The camera itself seems excellent for the Moon but less so good on other targets.

 

https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/


Edited by Barnsey123, 08 January 2021 - 06:35 AM.

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#7015 Alex65

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Posted 08 January 2021 - 06:45 AM

I had the old AstroScan out this morning and observed the waning crescent moon.

 

Explored the area between Schiller and Bailly for a while with the 3.6mm eyepiece. I followed this by viewing the setting sun cutting the terminator through Cape Laplace, on the edge of the Sinus Iridum, with the 8mm eyepiece.

 

Beautiful morning but cold and with snow on the ground.


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#7016 Mbinoc

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Posted 09 January 2021 - 06:29 PM

Holy Cow, The sky looks clear tonight after several weeks of constant clouds. All day today was also cloudy,

 

I just walked out into the back yard at 5:15pm with some binoculars and could already see Mars. If this clear sky sticks a few more hours I will have to try and find some more targets.

 

I haven't seen a single star yet in 2021.

 

Edit: The stars are definitely out tonight in the Chicago burbs.. I cant see them yet with my bare eyes, but with some binoculars can find several.


Edited by Mbinoc, 09 January 2021 - 06:38 PM.

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#7017 Augustus

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Posted 09 January 2021 - 10:31 PM

I gave my friend Jordanne an Astroscan minus a mount a while back, and we tried it out at the Deerlick Astronomy Village on Tuesday using a dog food bowl as a substitute mount and atop the roof of her car. Worked pretty decently (though the finder I put on had some battery issues) and it was fun to pan around and look at a few of the brighter DSOs while her astrophotography rig shot M42.

 

astroscancropped.jpg

 

astroscan2cropped.jpg

 

This Astroscan is one of the early ones labelled "Astroscan 2001" inside the focuser housing, and it has really good optics. Jordanne replaced the foam beneath the primary and took pains to collimate it so it delivers really sharp images. The focuser is pretty smooth for its age too.


Edited by Augustus, 09 January 2021 - 10:38 PM.

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#7018 dave brock

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Posted 10 January 2021 - 04:08 AM

Looked at the Sun with my Watson refractor on its newly refurbished mount.

Not much action happening on the Sun though.

 

watson sun med.jpg

 

20210110a_171323a.jpg


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#7019 oldmanastro

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Posted 10 January 2021 - 10:38 AM

Last night it was clear but intermittent haze came and went. I took out the 3.5" Questar on the  Celestron wedgepod and spent a nice time observing doubles and some DSOs. Earlier in the evening with Orion lower in the horizon I tried observing more than the four stars of the Trapezium but to no avail. Later when Orion was crossing the Meridian and embedded in that area of darker skies, I shielded my eyes well from all extraneous light and remained at the eyepiece fixed on those four stars. After a while and when the seeing stabilized, I am sure that the e component was visible in quick flashes. The f component never materialized. The eyepiece used was the 16mm Brandon plus internal Barlow. 

 

Epsilon Arietis was next and resolved, almost touching, at 216x using a 6mm orthoscopic. Nice view of the two bright components. Kappa Leporis was next. Initially obscured by haze and then well observed at a separation of 2.4'. Sigma Orionis is always a nice multiple star to observe with its reddish primary. Zeta Orionis and Eta Orionis came through beautifully. The last double was Mu Canis Majoris with a bright primary and dim secondary. I couldn't see the colors described in the Norton's for this one. More aperture is probably required.

 

Across some haze I observed M41 in Canis major. The haze reduced the majesty of this rich open cluster. M42, observed while Orion was on the Meridian and with no haze in the area, was magnificent with that sort of gull wing appearance that one gets in smaller telescopes. At least that's my impression. The night ended with a view of M45 or the Peiades. I couldn't fit the 5 sisters in my field of view with the 16mm eyepiece. The 32mm Brandon was in the telescope case but I had at hand a 23mm Aspheric that had not been tested in this telescope. The Aspheric accommodated the 5 stars in the field right to the edge. This very economical eyepiece with a plastic aspheric eye lens has surprised me with excellent view in every telescope that I have used it. The grand view of the Pleiades Cluster finished the session as more haze was rolling over. The Questar, as usual was a pleasure to use. The Questar finder and Norton's charts were made for each other.


Edited by oldmanastro, 10 January 2021 - 02:02 PM.

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#7020 oldmanastro

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 10:18 AM

Yesterday morning I decided to do some work on the 6336 76mm Sears refractor focuser. A laser collimator confirmed that it was misaligned. I also took the opportunity to remove old grease and lubricate with lithium grease. The old grease was thick and caked in some areas of the rack and pinion mechanism. The alignment took sometime playing with the use of pieces of felt pads to accommodate the draw tube while providing smooth movements. The end result was an aligned focuser and very smooth operation of both, draw tube and rack and pinion segments. The telescope was well collimated. This job required testing and yesterday's evening was perfect for it.

 

  The 6336 was placed on the Orion Astroview mount. The sky was very clear with a transparency of 4 mainly near the zenith and  to the east and south at more that 45 degrees altitude. The north remains embedded in high levels of light pollution. I am lucky to be able to see Polaris at all. The telescope was pointed first at Rigel. The results of the focuser centering were evident. Defocused, Rigel remained nice and round though the whole FOV of a 30mm Plossl and the 23mm Aspheric. Collimation was tack sharp and Rigel secondary component was showing nicely.

 

From Orion I moved into Gemini looking for some of the well known doubles. 38 Geminorum showed a white-yelliwish primary. the components were well separated at 120x. Delta Geminorum was next with a difficult secondary observed with averted vision. Delta was under the influence of heavy floodlights to the east. M35 was higher and showed 8 of its brightest stars embedded into a very rich open cluster. The 23mm Aspheric did a wonderful job on M35. Kappa Geminorum showed very well. The best view was provided by by that black barrel eyepiece that some of us have come to know as Faworski's 8mm Plossl. It provides a very dark and contrasty field. I had to use my hands as shields to get at the secondary of Kappa Geminorum. You don't leave Gemini without a quick visit to Castor. The 8mm Plossl on the 6336 brought out two fine Airy discs. If the secondary was a little brighter it would look like a Jeep coming at you on a very dark road. 

 

The next move was to Canis Majoris were the first target was M41. By this time the open cluster was high enough to be well observed. I counted 55 stars using the 23mm Aspheric with at least 7 bright ones. I don't see it as rich as M35 although it seems to cover a similar area. Mu Canis Majoris was excellent on the 8mm Plossl at 150x.  The primary showed an orange color near a whitish and close secondary. Sirius was observed not because I though that the Pub will pop out in full view, at least not with the 76mm aperture. I wanted to check the color correction of the Astro Optical lens. There was a very, and I mean very, slight tinge of violet with the 30mm and 8mm Plossl, a sign of excellent color correction.

 

With some clouds already coming from the east northeast and Orion crossing the Meridian, I decided to take a shot at the Trapezium. With the 10mm Aspheric and 8mm Plossl, the E component of the multiple star system was observed. It was easier with averted vision but could also be observed directly in those moments were the seeing is excellent. 

 

Clouds started arriving at 10:45pm. It was a good observing night with a temperature of 74 degrees (cool by our standards). I never mentioned that sometimes during this observing session I switched to my Celestron 25X70 binoculars with an almost 3 degrees FOV. Magnificent views of the clusters and Orion Nebula with this one (Santa's gift).


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#7021 Corcaroli78

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 04:40 PM

Hi All,

 

After several days of cold weather with rain and snowfall here in Denmark, today the sky was clear and i decided to take a look with binoculars just to see that the sky was clear so i feel pushed to have a short observing session before going to bed. 

 

I set the Telementor just outside my home, as the backyard is flooded with light from christmas decorations from a near supermarket. Still, i had a dark spot between the garage and the main entrance.

 

I observed Mars shinning high in the sky, and checking Sky safari, i decided to observe Uranus. I used a simple setup consisting on the Baader Zoom and a GSO 2.5 barlow.  I started observing at 35x and Uranus looked stellar. Pushing it to 105x and to ca. 200x, it appeared non-stellar and definitively graysh as a defocused star. I was satisfied to have observed for the fisrt time with the Telementor.

 

As the temperature was colder, i quickly attempted finding the -always elusive for me-  Eskimo Nebula.  It was easier than expected and the view at 150x showed a non-stellar disc.Nice!!

 

I closed the session, brougth the faithful Telementor inside and went outside again to do a tour with the Zeiss Dekarem 10x50 around the usual winter targets: Auriga clusters, the double cluster, the magnificent Andromeda Galaxy at the zenith, and a farewell to Vega which is going down in the sky.

 

A very productive 30 min with two "firsts" this time. Not bad after almost 2 months without a decent observation!!

 

Thanks for reading

 

Carlos 


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#7022 RichA

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 07:07 PM

Finally sunshine today at long last! I’m looking forward to checking out how much closer Jupiter and Saturn are as the continue to pull closer together as we near the Great Conjunction on the 21st. It’s been cloudy for days here so I expect to see quite a change since the last time I looked.

We had one whole clear day after 19 and then it was gone.  But it's good to see the sunspots are back.  I looked at it using the crudest equipment you'd imagine, a 50mm plasticy refractor (a Celestron) though the lens was glass with 2 welder's lenses on the front.   The image doubled, but it was just good to SEE the sun.


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#7023 Bomber Bob

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 06:20 PM

No Fuzzies tonight, but if the thin lingering layers at the upper-most levels oozes NE, I may get to use Stubby, my C102, and/or my Lafayette 60x420...  I know I'm tempting Fate, but seeing will have to be lousy to keep the 2 fracs in the shed.

 

1900L:  Upper Level layers withdraw... Woo-hoo!  1915L:  Low Level thick broken layer slides in... No!!!  So, maybe this weekend.  And I predict:  Soon as the Moon returns, so will crystal-clear nights.

 

I ain't livin' right.

 

Mars at sundown in the C102:  Redder than red.  Acidalium is cubic and the only prominent marking at 200x (Nagler 5).  The Party is definitely over!


Edited by Bomber Bob, 13 January 2021 - 09:00 PM.

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#7024 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

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  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 17 January 2021 - 06:09 PM

Cold west winds & cloud strands nixed my Newt Night on SAT, and tonight looks like a repeat.  Seeing Right Now is near perfect, but after sundown... 

 

NWS GOES RGB 20210117Z2300.jpg

 

Last night I set up Stubby under our covered back porch, and enjoyed a few views from Aries to Gemini, but the cold damp wind still managed to find me.  NWS says MON night will be perfect, and -- as usual! -- the Moon is returning.  Anywho, got 2 fracs & 2 Newts in the shed, just in case.


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#7025 ZONTAR TED

ZONTAR TED

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Posted 19 January 2021 - 12:11 AM

This is my first post. Thanks for having me and glad to have fun here sharing ODYSSEY 8  experiences since 1985.

I intend to post images of the instructions and spec sheets. I ordered it from an Astronomy magazine ad for 239.00.

Just cleaned it up ( after the mirrors were caked with 10 years of dust clumps ) for Comet Neowise this past July.

 

Tonight here in Richmond, Va. I saw a beautiful sapphire blue ring around the moon for 1/2 hour or less which compelled me to observe the 1/5 crescent with my brother. This scope is performing as well now as it did in '85... probably better since I managed to get all of the fuzz and hairs out of the eyepieces for the first time too. By the way, I did absolutely no columation when removing and replacing the mirror and reinserting the 3 inch screws.

 

Since July I have christened my friend and several neighbors with first time observations of the moon, Saturn and Jupiter all in a 1/2 hour.  I remember waiting a year to accomplish the same.

Our neighborhood astronomer of note just replaced his "classic " 8" steel tube reflector with a Celestron 9" .

The night of the "Christmas Star " conjunction he sent out an email and had about 2o people see it ... through a monitor.

The next night when I pulled the ODYSSEY 8 out into our dead end street to observe Saturn and Jupiter a couple of neighbors said " Boy this is even better than John's telescope ! "

 

This ODYSSEY 8 has many highlights including Haley's comet, Hyakutake, Hale Bopp and a cruise ship at Bethany Beach at 3am close to shore where I could see people walking on the deck ( upside down of course. ) 


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