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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#7076 Spyke

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 12:55 PM

Zeiss eyepieces are a gateway drug. Before you know it, you'll be into their objectives. wink.gif

 

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#7077 Pete W

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 10:51 PM

With the Tx freeze-pocalypse nearly over (hope to get water turned on tomorrow, after none for 5 days) took out the little Kowa TS-1 spotter for some quick peeks at Messier opens.  M41 @ 25x was nicely resolved with a more concentrated center. M47 is brighter but sparser.  M46 was only faintly visible glow, averted vision hinted at a few superimposed stars.  M93 was significantly smaller with a few of the brighter stars easily visible.  Had to dig out the atlas to get to M50.  Larger, more scattered & more resolved than M93.

 

Picked off a few other odds and ends:  NGC 2362, NGC2360 (faint glow) in CMa; the colorful group Collinder 135 in Pup,  NGC2244 in Mon and M79 (obvious with AV) in Lep. 


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#7078 Mbinoc

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 12:06 AM

Its nice and clear tonight, after browsing around for a few minutes with binoculars first, I could not resist setting up a scope for a quick 15 minute moon session.

 

1.JPG

 

It was the first time I set up a scope outdoors in over a month. I have however setup a smaller one inside several times just to watch backyard birds out through a window.

 

Prior to setting up the scope tonight, I setup a small 5$ 2nd hand goodwill find flat screen TV in the kitchen, and am currently watching a vintage 70's era space program over the air on digital channel 59-003, whatever channel that is. Its amazing how many free channels a tiny paper thin 11'x8" HD antenna can pull in when tapped to a window.

 

A little window mounted hd antenna pulls in way more channels and at better quality than I remember ever getting in the old analog rabbit ear days.

 

2.JPG

 

It was a cool little first episode to watch on the new to me TV, especially while warming up from coming back in from outside and waiting for my tea kettle to warm up on the stove.

 

3.JPG


Edited by Mbinoc, 20 February 2021 - 01:18 AM.

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#7079 Bomber Bob

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 05:16 PM

It was clear here last night, but windy -- no, blustery -- & COLD.  Tonight will be calmer & warmer, with good to excellent seeing, and any east wind will be blocked by my shed, so I'll be out there... Gonna keep it very simple:  No 4-scope SxSxSxS's, just the restored C/V C80 on the Mizar SP.  The new powder-coat should improve the views -- I read that on the Internet, so it must be true...

 

The NOS Bushnell drive system came in, so I'll test it on the SP.  And, I'll compare views through the NOS C/V 4-slot eyepiece turret, and my new TAK 1.25" & .965" prism diagonals.  Sometimes a waxing Quarter Moon can be a blessing -- don't need Big Scopes, or multiple scopes.  No faint fuzzies.  Only the brighter doubles & open clusters.  But mainly, and unavoidably, that smaller half of our double planet system -- sure looks big in small scope, though!

 

C80 Premium lived up to its name, but the NWS was only half-right:  Crystal Clear skies... and a 6-10 knot wind ~ sundown out of the WNW.  No shelter for Ol' BB & his arthritis.  I had the turret loaded with spectros KE 25 (36x), KE 10 (90x), PL 7.5 (120x), & PL 5 (180x) -- very smooth rotation back & forth.

 

The Straight Wall has always fascinated me, stood out even in my smallest scopes.  Kinda deflated to learn it's not a 10-mile high 100% vertical cliff, but you can imagine how much fun a redneck pre-teen had with its Latin name -- Rupes Recta...  The Wall is the main attraction, but the craters Birt & Thebit, and the other faults & cracks in that area are interesting, too.  At F11, the C80 has more CA than my AO F16, but the views are very pleasing -- especially at 120x.

 

Only took me 40 years to "discover" Vixen refractors.  Closest I came to buying one was back in 1988, and I think I'd already ordered my D&G 5" F10 by then.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 20 February 2021 - 09:13 PM.

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#7080 Augustus

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 06:13 PM

Tried out an Astroscan that I got for free and will likely give away. It's one of the later ones from the 90s with USA-made optics and a peepsight. Focuser roller is a little worn down so doesn't work too well and the primary has some fungus. Moon still looks good.


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#7081 oldmanastro

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 06:37 PM

Tried out an Astroscan that I got for free and will likely give away. It's one of the later ones from the 90s with USA-made optics and a peepsight. Focuser roller is a little worn down so doesn't work too well and the primary has some fungus. Moon still looks good.

If my memory is not playing tricks, I remember that Edmund had a contest to name the Astroscan. It was a bestseller for quite a while. A very practical small RFT that started many people on the hobby including many kids.


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#7082 highfnum

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 07:40 PM

well i dont know if classic 

2 inch 13 footer reproduction  of  "the telescope that never was" by Robert Hooke (folded singlet lens refractor see p 61 "the history of the telescope H C King"

notice at F80 any dirt on eyepiece shows  up

image actually crisper than i could do holding phone

2inch13footer.jpg

 

 

 


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#7083 Terra Nova

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Posted 21 February 2021 - 08:29 AM

well i dont know if classic 

2 inch 13 footer reproduction  of  "the telescope that never was" by Robert Hooke (folded singlet lens refractor see p 61 "the history of the telescope H C King"

notice at F80 any dirt on eyepiece shows  up

image actually crisper than i could do holding phone

attachicon.gif2inch13footer.jpg

I would say it’s a classic, or most certainly an homage to one. Interesting! How do you mount and aim such a creature? I’d love to see a picture of it.


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#7084 oldmanastro

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Posted 21 February 2021 - 10:37 AM

Clouds finally cleared out yesterday near 9:45pm. I took out the old Celestar 8 on its Wedgepod, did an average polar alignment and started observing. First target was Sirius. Collimation was spot on. At 250x with the 8mm Plossl, the Pup was visible without any difficulty. The 6mm UO orthoscopic made it even more conspicuous. I spent quite sometime enjoying the view. The next target were a few variables that I wanted to estimate. They included S Aurigae, W Aurigae and U Monocetoris. I hunted them down by star hopping and creating small asterism that eventually lead you to the variable. Their reddish color, sometimes deep red, gives them away most of the time. I found S Aurigae to be the reddest of the group.

 

After the third variable I stopped for a while on the past first quarter moon. Erasthotenes was just out of the terminator with the Apennine mountain range that seems to unwind out of the crater in sharp contrast against the lunar terrain. This segment of the Imbrium basin outer ring is always impressive. It makes you ponder the force of the impact that produced a mountain range with peaks that it some cases rise to 16,000 feet. Next on the moon was the Valles Alpes, one of my favorites. I tried the to see the rille in its center but to no avail. The moon was too low now above the second floor concrete roof and I could see the wavy pattern of the air turbulence. 

 

At 11:15pm a mass of broken clouds appeared and started to move quickly through the area bringing a lot of turbulence. A bigger and continuous cloud mass was behind that one. I decided not to push my luck and ended the session. The rest of the variables will have to wait. The not so good looking Celestar did a good job. I used the drive system only on the moon. All the other observation were hand driven. It still amazes me to see this telescope being driven for hours by a solitary 9V battery of the kind we used on transistor radios (remember those?). 


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#7085 highfnum

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Posted 21 February 2021 - 03:10 PM

this is hooke scope now ( prototype version) 

i plan to remount optics in wood tube of proper length ,  with proper sighting tube aka of 17th century

i cheated a bit using meade finder to help me find objects 

 

you can see extented pvc cause i had to adjust for fl

 

but  otherwise optics are what Hooke would understand-   singlet lens 

at that time no one had skill to make decent mirrors(flats) 

thats why its the scope that never was

hookescope.jpg

 

 

 


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#7086 highfnum

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Posted 21 February 2021 - 03:21 PM

posted image of sun with edmund 2  inch F25 scope

https://www.cloudyni...ch-scope-quark/


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#7087 Bonco2

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Posted 21 February 2021 - 09:22 PM

Florida skies tonight were as good as it can get. Transparent and very steady. Used the Unitron 128 60mm f/15. It's a dream in function and optics.  The moon was right at my zenith. Usually on the moon in less steady skies I can only go to about to about 130X before the view gets unsteady. Tonight the best views were at 187X. Never seen such clarity of Copernicus' walls and floor. So nice to view the whole orb with almost no atmospheric disturbance.  Went to Rigel and had a steady easy view. Alnitak was the best I've ever seen it in a 60mm scope. Clearly  defined split. The secondary looked like a white pearl next to the orangish primary. Eta Orion  was next. Very tight but clearly resolved.  Both looked blue white but too dim to be sure. Love the quality of the 128, so easy to point  and it's steady as rock at high magnification. Once you find your target you never loose it when changing eyepieces.

Bill   


Edited by Bonco2, 21 February 2021 - 09:26 PM.

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#7088 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 03:00 AM

The good weather continues, so I was out with the Vixen 80L. The seeing was very good (for Germany), maybe a 5 or so, with periods of excellent seeing. Near the horizon the seeing was poor. The bright moon reduced the target list to stars and clusters.

First up was Orion. Rigel was an easy split. The three doubles at the bottom of the sword were all easy. The Trap was very nice. It is indeed a rare night when all 4 stars are nice dots and not constantly smearing. Sigma was a toughie. The bright sky made the C star all but invisible. Took a good while to get it. I cruised up the belt and ended at W Ori, a nice red carbon star. I just love these carbon stars and the 80L shows the colors nicely.

All of Canis Major was visible tonight, so I headed south. Normally, M41 and everything below are lost in haze, but tonight I was able to nab M41 in no time. I checked out some doubles around the dog's nose, and found W CMa, another carbon star. Then I went to 30 CMa, the jump off point to find VY CMa, another carbon star. To my surprise, all the stars were red because of atmospheric diffraction. I was not able to identify VY, but 30 CMa was a spectacular stop light red and deep blue.

I finished up on the moon. After looking at the main sights along the terminator, I ended up at Plato. I always try to pick up the biggest craterlet, the one in the middle. All I could get was a white pin **** that came and went. I could pick out the Rimae Plato as it heads out from crater G, turns south and loops back to the north, where I lost it. I tried to pick it up where it exits the Montes Alpes at crater J and heads south to craters KA and K, but to no avail. I moved on to the area between Mons Pico and Montes Teneriffe. I could see Pico G and the similar sized unnamed craters left and right of it, and a straight land mass between Mons Pico and Pico G. The crater between Pico G and Mons Pico is about the same size as the craterlet in Plato. One I could see, the other I couldn't.

Viewing the moon in the zenith made it clear to me that the Vixen tripod is too short for this long tubed refractor.
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#7089 highfnum

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 05:57 AM

tried to take better shot thru 2 inch f80 Hooke scope

notice even at F80 singlet still shows some CA

2inchf80north.jpg

 


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#7090 Terra Nova

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 10:31 AM

tried to take better shot thru 2 inch f80 Hooke scope

notice even at F80 singlet still shows some CA

attachicon.gif2inchf80north.jpg

But just imagine how astounding that views such as those in your photos would have been to someone peering through such a telescope four hundred years ago!


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#7091 highfnum

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 11:57 AM

yes they may not have believed it


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#7092 semlin

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 02:13 PM

spent over 2 hours yesterday looking at the cell tower across the valley with my 7te-5 and 10te-5 trying out for the first time a box of old microscope eyepieces one at a time through each scope and attempting to sort and compare them.  

 

i found some nice views, but i got sick of that cell tower!


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#7093 Lonnie Utah

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 07:06 AM

I took out the Quantum two nights in a row (Sunday and Monday). I've been wanting to show off M42 and M43 to the wife and kid as my wife had never seen it and the kid had only seen it briefly very early in the AM months ago. Sunday night there were broken clouds around but we managed a few quick glimpses between the clouds. The view were average to above, but short lived. Still the wife thought Orion was spectacular (and she's not wrong). Got some really good view of the moon as well. 

 

Last night we had the clearest skies we've had in weeks. Unfortunately, we also had lots of upper atmospheric winds and distortion. Even so, I was able to pull several of the Orion doubles in addition to the previous views. We could see the Trapezium A,B,C and D, but I couldn't make out E and F last night. I jumped around and tried to find a few other things. I spent a long time trying to find M1, but alas I think between the upper atmospheric distortion and it's relative proximity to the moon last night it was a losing battle so I gave up after I started to get cold. 

 

On a side note, we're doing online school this year and the science modules for the past few weeks been on "astronomy".  Mainly it's been constellations, star names and how they change with the rotation of the Earth. They've also looked at relative brightness and distance of stars. On one of their video meets a week or so ago, our kid pulls out the Cambridge Atlas and a star wheel and starts showing the teacher and other kids in the class where Sirius, Betelgeuse and several other deep sky object are located. (How many 4th graders know about the Cambridge atlas? lol.gif) Yesterday the assignment was "You have a pen pal in the southern hemisphere. Use an online source to discover what constellations they might see this time of year. He's got cousins in Sydney, Aus. so well pulled up stelarium and he went to town. It's been good to see him have a practical application to what he's learning online. 


Edited by Lonnie Utah, 23 February 2021 - 07:07 AM.

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#7094 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 07:40 AM

Nice report Lonnie U... I too have had some trouble pulling in the E in the Trapezium and finally got it one night with a quality 5 inch refractor. F still eludes me but keeps the fires burning

 Thanks for sharing the young folks story. It is especially nice to hear about the astronomy modules and their discussions about northern  and and perhaps later the southern hemisphere 

  constellations......

 

A couple of years ago, I  mentioned to my wife that someday  I would like to see the southern       cross ..in the past she has replied that she would like to go to Australia and perhaps New Zealand as well ......it is nice to dream of making post pandemic plans

 

Hurry springtime


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 23 February 2021 - 03:34 PM.

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#7095 Lonnie Utah

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 07:45 AM

.in the past she has replied that she would like to go to Australia and perhaps New Zeeland as well ......it is nice to dream of making post pandemic plans

 

While I have really enjoyed Australia the couple of times I've visited, New Zealand is OFF THE CHARTS. I could retire to the southern island in a heartbeat.  Much like Wyoming here in the states, there are more sheep than people there. lol.gif


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#7096 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 03:27 PM

Speaking of observing from down under

 

 I saw this   online star party from there  and I will watch the rest tonight

 

https://www.cloudyni...ine-star-party/


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#7097 oldmanastro

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Posted 24 February 2021 - 03:43 PM

Another clear night yesterday. There was a bit of a breeze at the beginning but it died down as the night progressed. The Sears 2535 76.2mm f/16 was out and mounted on the Astroview equatorial. This is a perfect mount for these older long focus refractor telescopes. It provides a very stable platform. The original tripod and equatorial are nice too but the breeze would have moved the slow motion cables causing vibration. 

 

The already past first quarter moon was very high at 8:00pm. It was the first target. Aristarchus and Herodotus with the Valles Schroter region was coming out of the terminator shadow. The 8mm Plossl showed the region very well at 150x but the seeing was good so I went up to 200x with the 6mm orthoscopic. The image was very clear showing a lot of detail. Even the 4mm orthoscopic (300x)  provided a great view. I decided to take an iPhone image through this eyepiece. It is here with just a tad of processing. Not bad for the 55 tears old Sears. I spent about an hour observing this region. Some more areas came out of the dark. The sun was rising in Schroter Valley. The craters Gassendi and Schiller were already out of the shadows as well as one of my favorites, the Sinus Iridum. I have always pondered at the name Sinus Iridum (Bay of Rainbows). Maybe the early observers, using simple refractors with a lot of chromatic aberration saw the Sinus Iridum full of colors like the rainbow. This would have probably required a certain angle of illumination. It's just a thought.

 

I continued the night with some doubles. 54 Leonis delivered a great view at 150x with the 8mm Plossl. Theta Aurigae was difficult but I caught it with a combination Barlow and a 20x Nikon microscope eyepiece. I don't know what type of eyepiece this Nikon is but it delivers bright contrasty views with the long focus refractors. Omega Aurigae was a no go especially considering the brightness of the nearby moon. Then I took a fun tour of the usual Orion doubles. All were easy with this telescope. Zeta Orionis was a clean split at 200x. The 12X40 finderscope works well but these telescopes would have benefited from something like an 8X40 with a wider field. A mass of high clouds arrived at about 11:30pm and ended the session. The old telescope delivered great images for its size. The breeze died down completely by this time leaving a rather cool (by local standards) night air. Maybe tonight the Sears 2535 comes out again on it's tripod.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 2535Sears.JPG
  • Aristarchus-HerodotusB20210224-76.2mmRFR-Iphone.JPG

Edited by oldmanastro, 24 February 2021 - 08:23 PM.

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#7098 Pete W

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Posted 24 February 2021 - 04:25 PM

Nice report Guido!  I'm with ya about the 12x40 finder...just a bit too narrow.  After using the wider finders on my other scopes it always takes some time to get used to the 12x40 on the 6339a.


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#7099 oldmanastro

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Posted 24 February 2021 - 08:29 PM

Nice report Guido!  I'm with ya about the 12x40 finder...just a bit too narrow.  After using the wider finders on my other scopes it always takes some time to get used to the 12x40 on the 6339a.

Thanks Pete! I never complained about the 12X40 finder until I started using 9X50s. Going back to the 12X40 is really hard. I don't know why they chose such an odd magnification with a narrow field. Even a 6X30 is easier to use.


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#7100 Bomber Bob

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Posted 24 February 2021 - 09:42 PM

Moonlight & Magnolias... and it ain't nowhere near May yet.  NWS thought we might break a record high:  At 1400L, the official temp hit 76* F, so we probably got close to that 80* mark...

 

Probably my last night for a while with the C80.  Clouds & rain return tomorrow.  By the time we get clear skies again, the pesky Moon won't be a factor, and my Newts can come out & play.  Did a cursory look at Luna, then settled in for some doubles.  Only sciency thing I did was "calibrate" the eyepiece turret:  Nailed the focus on Betelgeuse with the spectros PL5, then used the thumbscrews in the other 3 slots to tweak their focusing -- sync to the master.  Very nice to zoom in / out without having to re-focus at all...

 

Orion is a target-rich environment for doubles, and I played my Is It or Not? game:  At just 36x (KE25), could I tell by a star's shape that it was indeed a double, while I roamed from Rigel & points north, staying clear of the moonglow.  No, I don't keep score.  

 

Very relaxing end to another crazy work day.  Not too hot / cold, and no Bugs - yet.


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