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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#7776 ccwemyss

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Posted 31 August 2021 - 10:28 PM

My C14 is wrapped in Reflectix insulation. I find it to be quite usable for visual as soon as I open up on many nights. However, it really is fully wrapped. There is a piece cut to cover the back with just the tailpiece and focuser poking out, the tube insulation extends up the dew shield, and there is a Reflectix cap over the front that comes off with the metal cover. Before I added the rear and front covers, just having the tube covered only helped marginally.

 

I'm sure there are small residual tube currents that might be unacceptable for high res imaging. But before I did this, I would let the scope come to equilibrium, just get into observing, then the air temperature would drop and the strong currents would come back. I don't see that behavior at all any more, and dewing happens much less often. 

 

Chip W. 


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#7777 PawPaw

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Posted 01 September 2021 - 08:27 AM

Excellent detailed report and superb telescope combined with that clock drive arrangement and the equatorial mount. It really looks classical. I have the three doubles on my list for the next observing run.

Thank you!  I have always enjoyed your reports as well.........just trying to pay back a little.

 

Cheers

 

Don


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#7778 Bomber Bob

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Posted 01 September 2021 - 02:36 PM

Well... we may have 2 consecutive nights of decent seeing, so I have my 1970s Dakin 4" F10 and my 1988 Tak FC-100 F8 on the Ready Line in the shed -- each on a 1980s Mizar EQ Mount, SP + tall tripod for the former, and AR-1 + ShortPod for the latter.  Gonna have a good old-fashioned Scope Fight -- maybe I should sell tickets...

 

BB's Mark 1 Eyeballs:  Debbie & I had our biennial Eye Exams this morning.  I have the visual acuity of a guy in his late 20s -- L: 20/10 & R: 20/15 (an improvement from the previous test); my Color Vision is near normal -- when my blood pressure is low, and my pulse is calm.  I still have over-active rods & cones that are affected by my zany circulatory system.  New Doctor, so I explained to him about my observing, and was told that I can have variations in color perception during a session...  nothing drastic, like red becoming blue, but it's still a bummer.  And, worse yet, it's most active in my right (dominant) eye -- something I've suspected for years.  My Left Eye is much more photo-sensitive than my right, and has overall better performance, but it feels weird using it.

 

I can add this oddity to my list of KGDs (Known Genetic Defects) -- they're racking up!


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#7779 Terra Nova

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Posted 02 September 2021 - 03:56 PM

The sky is a brilliant blue this afternoon! It’s simply amazing. I haven’t seen it look like this in some time. Definitely a night for observing coming up! I just took this picture from my backyard. There is absolutely NO enhancement whatsoever. That’s pure Mother Nature you’re looking at.

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#7780 sanderslewallen

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Posted 02 September 2021 - 04:37 PM

Hi Terra,  did you hand off the Questar today, hopefully with a tear in your eye?  Sander   LOL


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#7781 Terra Nova

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Posted 02 September 2021 - 04:41 PM

Hi Terra,  did you hand off the Questar today, hopefully with a tear in your eye?  Sander   LOL

Hi Sanders. I did, but no tears. I really like the new owner. He’s enthusiastic and I think he will enjoy the little guy. I’m quite happy with the handoff. I think it will get used more and I won’t have to feel guilty for not using it. I feel blessed to have what I have.


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#7782 barbie

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Posted 02 September 2021 - 07:35 PM

As frustrated as I can sometime get with the weather here in Northeast Ohio, I will probably never sell my superb 1996 Meade ETX 90 O.T.A. and enjoy its superlative optics till the day I draw my last breath!! I've enjoyed my best views ever of the gas giants through this marvelous little scope!!!


Edited by barbie, 02 September 2021 - 07:41 PM.

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#7783 Kokatha man

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Posted 02 September 2021 - 08:11 PM

The sky is a brilliant blue this afternoon! It’s simply amazing. I haven’t seen it look like this in some time. Definitely a night for observing coming up! I just took this picture from my backyard. There is absolutely NO enhancement whatsoever. That’s pure Mother Nature you’re looking at.

...unfortunately for our most recent caper such clear sky doesn't tell the main story - drove to the Murray Mallee for a one-nighter (160km/100m) the day before yesterday (Wednesday here) & the skies were truly magnificent all night...transparency-wise...at around 6000mm f/l unfortunately the seeing was rotten, despite maintaining our vigilance for nearly 4 hours...! :lol:

 

We know this is always on the cards even though this particular region is better than most...Pattie agreeing with my comment about it getting harder to recover from these "lightening runs" as we grow older...but while we can we will - because once you can't you can't...if that bit of self-evident commentary has any real meaning..! gramps.gif shakecane.gif shrug.gif rofl2.gif


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#7784 Corcaroli78

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 03:17 AM

After 3 consecutive very good nights in Denmark with steady sky, comfortable temperatures and very good transparency,  I had a very short session with the Telementor focused only in Jupiter. While it was still low in the sky, i was able to push the Telementor up to 250x using the ES 6.7 + 2x barlow providing a nice sharp view, with the cloud bands being visible. I hope to catch a shadow transit one of these days as i have not witness one yet.

 

Clear -classic- skies!

 

Carlos


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#7785 Bomber Bob

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 07:05 AM

Dynamic Duo Delivers:

 

Dak & Tak - 4 Duo S01.jpg

 

Both fracs used TV eyepieces for high-power, and RKEs for low-power & sweeping.  Dak had the Excellent GSO 2" dielectric, and the Tak had the very good older AT 2" dielectric.  While I waited on the Planets to approach the meridian, I did some sweeping at about 25x, using my vintage 2" Erfles.  Both fracs are close to RFT Fun with the summer Milky Way!  But, low-level wet air put a damper on all but the very brightest nebulae...

 

In 6.5 / 10 seeing last night...  Saturn:  3 Belts & 3 Moons in both;  disk & (especially) the Rings are snow white in the Tak, off-white tinged with pale yellow in the Dak; Tak Belts have hints of salmon, olive, & tan mixed with the grays, Dak shows shades of gray; Cassini is easier to see in the Tak, but both displayed excellent contrast -- lots of faint stars made Moon identification tough!  Seeing limited both to about 160x -- dang it!  Because...  Jupiter!  Almost too bright at a "medium" power for both fracs.  I tried 225x, and had to back off -- got tired of chasing best focus.  Both fracs presented a sketchable Giant with a prominent GRS -- salmon in the Tak, and redder in the Dak.  GRS Notch was bolder in the Tak, but both resolved it very well.  So many belts, and so many textures & features within the belts & zones.  However... look slightly eschew, and you get the blue-violet corona around the disk in the Dak -- a cool reminder that it's an F10 achromatic refractor...

 

Findings:

 

- In less than 7/10 seeing, the F8 Tak fluorite has a noticeable advantage over the F10 Dak achro.  Saturn was in & out of roiling air, yet the Tak didn't lose belt colors, Cassini, or the ring shadow on the disk;  Dak lost the colors to grays, had slight smearing, and Cassini would flash in & out.  Jupiter was higher & in better air, so the differences were minimal, except as already noted.

 

- The Dak's contrast is as good as the Tak's.  I actually counted the number of faint stars between the Delphinus Double-Double, and the Dak was higher with both averted & straight-on viewing with both fracs using RKEs at about 35x.  Mitigating Factor:  Much newer GSO 2" mirror in the Dak, older but visually very good AT 2" mirror in the Tak.  

 

- The Dak was built for 2" accessories, and has ZERO vignetting of the field; whereas, I adapted a 2" Baader ClickLock to the Tak.  With 2" eyepieces, the field is larger, and is visually more appealing in the Dak, even though it's slower than the Tak.  Honestly, I'm more likely to tote the less expensive Dak to the country for deep-sky -- but my Triple Nickle 5" F5 Triplet will go before either of these two slower fracs.

 

- Mizar EQ Comparisons:  Overall, excellent motions & tracking with AR-1 & SP EQs.  However... the SP's wood tripod has about 1//3 the damping time of the AR's aluminum tripod at high-power, which made fine-focusing the Tak tougher than the Dak.  Much as I like having 2 all-original Mizars, I may get another wood surveyor tripod with a compatible hub if I continue using the Tak with the AR-1.  SP has no damping issues carrying the heavier Tak 4" OTA.

 

This Duo reinforced my opinion that a quality 4" Refractor is a must for us city-dwellers.  I got sketchable views of both planets in both fracs in sub-par seeing.  Views of doubles, star fields, and open clusters were quite nice, too.  The Dakin is a hand-crafted instrument, but Clammy (my 1980s Celestron / Vixen C102 F10 achro with a circlet of tiny clams in the flint) isn't that far behind my Dakin, and I got it for $100.  It's much lighter than either Duo member, so any SP-equivalent EQ can carry it well, even a high-power.  Food for Thought if you're considering a Classic 4" Refractor.  IME, they are worth more than they cost.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 03 September 2021 - 12:45 PM.

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#7786 clamchip

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 09:43 AM

I've been observing Jupiter and Saturn, low and a slow boil but able to take high power.

Something I'd like to mention that completely blew me away was last night I decided to

use a modern Celestron 8-24 zoom, unbelievable. This ain't grandma's zoom.

Celestron C8 and 5 of Saturn's moons straight thru with Meade RG ortho's and the zoom.

Not much of a difference between the zoom and my pet RGO's.

So now it looks like I can show up at the course with only one club, sand wedge thru woods

all with one club.

I'm so shocked I will confirm tonight. It's just not possible, zooms don't do this. But then

cars aren't suppose to parallel park by themselves ether.

 

Robert


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#7787 Terra Nova

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 09:50 AM

I had a great time last night observing Jupiter and Saturn with the little TV Pronto 70x480 ED on my TV Panoramic mount and my Takahashi FC-76 on my Vixen Porta II. The sky was brilliantly blue yesterday afternoon (previous post), but as evening approached, cirrus clouds began drifting in. By 8:30 pm, a few minutes after sunset the skies began to look disappointing so I went inside. I went back out shortly after 10 and things looked more promising, the clouds had seemingly disappeared but the sky was bright and transparency wasn’t as great as I had hoped it would be when I looked at the deep blue sky that afternoon. Getting a late start, I wanted a relaxing evening, just enjoying the views and thus, my choice of the two competent yet easy to set up alt-az mounts. (The older I get, the more I appreciate the ease of carryout, setup, and use of my alt-azimuth mounts, and a minimalist approach to gear used; hence my going down from six to one single equatorial mount.)

 

The eyepieces of choice last night were: 32mm TV Plossl, Meade 4000 26mm SP, Meade 4000 18mm SWA, Meade 4000 13.8mm SWA, Meade 4000 9.7mm SP, Meade 4000 6.4mm SP, and TV 4.8mm Nagler. (The Meades are all the older Japanese manufacture.) The range of magnifications were 15X to 100X with the Pronto and 19X to 125X with the FC-76, which was a nice range for an easy evening with a pair of alt-az mounted refractors.

 

While the transparency wasn’t what I had hoped for, the deficit was made up by the very stable state of the atmosphere. As I increased the magnification there was no turbulence noted what so ever. What impressed me was how well the little Pronto kept up with the Tak. The color fidelity was excellent in the Pronto, and a very nice range in subtle variations in the banding of Jupiter and Saturn was apparent. The somber burnt oranges to blue gray shades were noted along with the dominant NEB and SEB along with multiple thinner, darker temperate bands were noted on Jupiter and the GRS was quite apparent as it rotated into view. No false color or purple halo was noted at 75X (6.4mm Meade 4000 SP smoothie) with the Pronto, and only when I increased the magnification to 100X with the 4.8mm TV Nagler, did I note a faint purple glow surrounding Jupiter, however there was no edge discoloration or rim defraction to be seen.  By way of comparison, the Tak faithfully displayed Tak-sharp views of Jove as expected as I marched through the same eyepiece series. The only differences noted were the somewhat narrower field of view, complemented by slightly darker background skies and a tad higher contrast with the Tak. And of course absolutely no false color whatsoever. Both scopes clearly displayed the the four Galilean satellites as tiny discrete disks, and with the Tak, there was the ability to easily detect the yellow color of Io, the faint bluishness of Europa, and the typical gray of Ganymede and Callisto. Color differences of the moons weren’t really detectable with any degree of confidence in the views from the Pronto. I had called it a night and gone inside before Io began its transit, so no transits were observed.

 

Moving on to Saturn, I was struck by the fact of how readily apparent the rings were at lowest magnification (15X and 19X respectively) in both scopes using the 32mm Plossl. Saturn was absolutely lovely in both scopes and I could see three moons. Colors were true and views nice and sharp through the range in magnification, no false color or purple halo/haze was noted in either. Several bands were observed and the subtle mouse grays and tans of Saturns orb and rings, the stark blackness of Cassini’s division and the space between rings and limb were impressive in both. I am always struck by the utter, stark coldness and quiet, unapproachable beauty the Saturn displays in an apo or ED scope as opposed to its more yellowish appearance in an achromat, and tonight was no different. She was the cold mistress of the hot-blooded King when I observed these two magnification Gas Giants as seen in both TeleVue and the Takahashi.

 

There is a thread currently running over in the Refractors Forum titled In praise of the Pronto. I certainly have nothing but praise for mine. It’s definitely the ‘little scope that could’ if my sample is representative of the rest. It is extremely portable, and is a wonderful performer for a wide range of targets. It makes a wonderful grab-and-go and travel scope. I’ve been using mine for white-light solar observing all summer, and it’s a wonderful little nighttime performer as well. It gives nice wide fields and can do double duty as a tiny RFT. It’s sturdily built and the focuser is buttery smooth. A person asked me yesterday if I shed a tear when I handed off my Questar to its now owner and I replied no. I’ve become a dedicated TeleVue aficionado over the past couple of years, and two telescopes that would make me cry to give up would be my Pronto and my Genesis SDF on their two wonderful TV alt-az mounts and wooden tripods. The are both ergonomic dreams come true. You loose yourself in the easy views and ease of viewing, and the fact that there is a telescope between you and the Heavens just seems to melt away. I’ve never noticed this with any other scope.

 

Something else that impresses me is how much you can see and how good the views are when you just sit back, relax, observe and notice and don’t try and push the magnification. 30 to 40 X per inch can show you quite a lot if you’re looking through good glass and a stable atmosphere when take time to notice.


Edited by Terra Nova, 03 September 2021 - 11:08 AM.

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#7788 steve t

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 10:48 AM

The sky is a brilliant blue this afternoon! It’s simply amazing. I haven’t seen it look like this in some time. Definitely a night for observing coming up! I just took this picture from my backyard. There is absolutely NO enhancement whatsoever. That’s pure Mother Nature you’re looking at.

Terra - The skies on our side of the river were like yours all day, but around sunset high cirrus clouds moved in around sunset and persisted past midnight.

 

Wednesday night was clear and steady. It was the first time I was able to make out the Milky Way in Cygnus this summer. The great rift was very obvious. Also got some great views of Jupiter, in the ATM, 4" F/10 Newtonian, with a 8mm Brandon, and a Bright Blue (#80?) Baader eyepiece filter. 

 

I've got to admit that Fall is my favorite time of the year to observe.

Steve T


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#7789 Terra Nova

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 10:50 AM

I've been observing Jupiter and Saturn, low and a slow boil but able to take high power.

Something I'd like to mention that completely blew me away was last night I decided to

use a modern Celestron 8-24 zoom, unbelievable. This ain't grandma's zoom.

Celestron C8 and 5 of Saturn's moons straight thru with Meade RG ortho's and the zoom.

Not much of a difference between the zoom and my pet RGO's.

So now it looks like I can show up at the course with only one club, sand wedge thru woods

all with one club.

I'm so shocked I will confirm tonight. It's just not possible, zooms don't do this. But then

cars aren't suppose to parallel park by themselves ether.

 

Robert

Good to hear. I’ve never been fond of zooms even tho I had two good ones, a Vixen 8-24 and a Lomo 7-21. I sold the Vixen and gave the Lomo to my daughter. There’s lots of buzz over in the Eyepiece Forum lately about a new Svbony zoom. Lots of good things said about it, and its cheap too!


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#7790 Terra Nova

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 10:54 AM

Terra - The skies on our side of the river were like yours all day, but around sunset high cirrus clouds moved in around sunset and persisted past midnight.

 

Wednesday night was clear and steady. It was the first time I was able to make out the Milky Way in Cygnus this summer. The great rift was very obvious. Also got some great views of Jupiter, in the ATM, 4" F/10 Newtonian, with a 8mm Brandon, and a Bright Blue (#80?) Baader eyepiece filter. 

 

I've got to admit that Fall is my favorite time of the year to observe.

Steve T

Hi Steve, the Wratten 80A has been my favorite filter to use with Jupiter for some time. It seems to really tease out the delicate subtle structures in Jupiter’s bands.


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#7791 steve t

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 11:23 AM

Hi Steve, the Wratten 80A has been my favorite filter to use with Jupiter for some time. It seems to really tease out the delicate subtle structures in Jupiter’s bands.

Hi Terra - Wednesday, I dug out a few old filters and did a mini comparisons on Jupiter. I made a similar observation as you at being able to make out more detail with #80A.

 

One thing that did surprise me was at how much detail a broad band deep sky filter brought out on Jupiter.

 

Steve T


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#7792 Bomber Bob

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 01:34 PM

One thing that did surprise me was at how much detail a broad band deep sky filter brought out on Jupiter.

 

Before I bought my Astronomik CLS filters, I used my OLD Orion SkyGlow filters (1.25" & .965") with my refractors to bring out finer belt details on Jupiter -- crazy colors, but more details.


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#7793 Corcaroli78

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 04:12 PM

I had a great time last night observing Jupiter and Saturn ......

 

Something else that impresses me is how much you can see and how good the views are when you just sit back, relax, observe and notice and don’t try and push the magnification. 30 to 40 X per inch can show you quite a lot if you’re looking through good glass and a stable atmosphere when take time to notice.

Terra,

 

Thanks for your very nice observing report, but more than a report is a very enjoyable chronicle! It seems you had a good time in the low aperture, high-quality optics. A pleasure to read it!

 

I just came now from a Jupiter observing session. I think this was the time that i prepared myself better, i set the CZJ Telementor in advance, i choose the EP´s that i wanted to use, i brought a chair, a table, my charts, my logbook for sketching and my faithful CZJ Dekarems as finder and, as soon it was dark, i started observing Jupiter, very sharp with the ES14 82 and the ES11 82, the ES6.7 82 showed that the atmosphere was not steady, but detail in the planet was visible. Unfortunately, and despite the weather forecast, clouds covered the sky and i was observing through the cloud holes... i am not sure if the weather will improve, but i spent most of the time observing among others the Double cluster at 37x, and the Dumbell at 37x too... 

 

I realized now that what makes me more happy is to pan the sky between 15x and 50x, the ease of the views, the amount of objects visible at that magnification, the aesthetics of the views.  i learned today that a quick setup is the key under my changing weather conditions.

 

in the meantime, while i write this, the Telementor stays outside pending for the sky to clear...

 

Clear skies!

Carlos 


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#7794 Bomber Bob

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 05:54 PM

I had my quarterly FJIs (neck injections) this morning, so no lifting > 15 lbs for at least 24 hours...  What's a poor Astro-Boy to do?   Move my 2 all-original 1980s Mizar Kits to the shed:  My Comet 100mm F8 EQ Newt, and my BN-80 Nature Scope 80mm F5 AZ Frac.  Because, ultra-light quality can be beautiful...

 

Just to Jinx It:  IF seeing tonight or tomorrow night is better than last night, I'm gonna test my brand new (okay, NOS) SVBONY 205 color planetary imager.  It's guaranteed to be 100% compatible with my Windows 10 laptop hardware & software, and my initial testing confirms it.

 

Takes < 10 mins to swap a Mizar MMD system to the Comet's EQ.  Easy-peasy!  How to > the Comet's 800mm focal length for Jupiter & Saturn imaging?  Well... I can remove its .965" Tall Adapter, and use the 1.25" sleeve that I made, and use my GSO 2.5x / Tak 2x Barlows.  Or, leave it, and use a .965" Eyepiece Projection tube -- my spectros KE15 / KE10 are great for this.  Ultra-sharp flat fields with zero glare.

 

Anywho... Take That! -- Medical Limitations!!

 

Crunching Numbers at this moment on my Real (IBM) Computer...

 

I shot over two dozen Jupiter AVIs with the Comet + SVBONY 205 Color Camera...  I have to say, more fun than my last hernia surgery -- though not by much.

 

Okay, my usual Weather & Seeing Report:  Thin moisture streaks at High Level, slightly larger/thicker at Low Level, but with a crystal clear Wedge pushing west into The Swamp from GA.  Seeing began at about a 6 at sunset, and 3 hours later, approaches 8 / 10 for clarity.  But this pizza slice introduced motion, so bad with the good...

 

Visually:  I jumped on Saturn as soon as it popped into the sunset sky.  Y'all, no lie, I caught glimpses of Rhea & Dione at just 80x (spectros KE10) + Titan (of course).  I had the Comet's .965" adapter in, so I continued with my Swiss-Zeiss EPs all the way to the PL5 (160x).  Gorgeous!  Best colors at 107x with the PL7.5 -- a remarkable EP in its own right.

 

I was on Jupiter as soon as it cleared the oaks, trying to decide if I should haul out ALL THAT imaging Gear...  I did, and I'll post some samples on the Imaging Thread.  Once again, I got the very very sharpest & most colorful views with my Brandon 6 & 8 eyepieces.  But that was after swapping out the .965" format.

 

BIF:  Moment of Coolness... watching the Eclipse of Io on the laptop screen.  I started a quick capture -- hope I actually caught it!

 

BIF2:  When I got tired of standing at the Comet, I sat at the BN-80 F5 -- really like this RFT with an AT 1.25" dielectric diagonal, so I'm leaving it installed.  VG Airy Disks with the Nagler 5 @ 80x, and the Delphinus Double-Double @ 50x with the RKE 8 is a pretty view.  With the clearer air, had no trouble nabbing The Ring & Dumbbell in it, but I mostly enjoyed the rich fields -- can't wait to turn this scope on the Winter Milky Way.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 04 September 2021 - 08:57 AM.

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#7795 clamchip

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 07:05 PM

Good to hear. I’ve never been fond of zooms even tho I had two good ones, a Vixen 8-24 and a Lomo 7-21. I sold the Vixen and gave the Lomo to my daughter. There’s lots of buzz over in the Eyepiece Forum lately about a new Svbony zoom. Lots of good things said about it, and its cheap too!

Here's the one I used last night just to make sure there is no mistaking which

one it is.

I have never liked zooms period, until last night that is.

I like this one, at least in a f/10 SCT.

It came with a telescope I bought and I put it in my misc drawer, I never even looked through it.

Robert

 

IMG_0470.jpg

IMG_0469.jpg


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#7796 oldmanastro

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 10:54 PM

This is from two nights ago but I hope it counts. It was the first clear night in many days of Saharan dust and heat indexes surpassing 100. It was not perfectly clear. There was a bit of the dusty haze there but the planets were out and as the night went on transparency improved. The dust cloud above was clearing. The seeing was excellent with a quiet atmosphere and no wind. It had rained during the day so the air was cool. I knew that dew would be a problem so the Sears 2535 76mm f/16 was out in original mount and with the 5 original eyepieces. I began observing Jupiter with each one and making notes about it. Here it goes:

 

22mm Kellner- Very  crisp image of Jupiter and the four satellites at 55x. Belts are visible but the image is small to discern any details.

 

12.5mm HM - A bigger image of the planet at 96x. Now several belts are visible. The focus is very sharp.

 

9mm HM- The image looks sharp and now the cloud belts and zones are very apparent but the field of view looks bright and there is some chromatic aberration with the image off center.

 

6mm HM - Excellent image in a very dark and ample field of view. Now details are apparent and the belts and zones are clearly delineated. The equatorial region shows some brighter areas and there are some spots in the southern border of the South Equatorial Belt. The image of the planet is sharp even at 200x.

 

4mm Ramsden- The belts can be seen and the image is well focused but the chromatic aberration of this eyepiece is intrusive.  

 

Summary- The best eyepieces for observing Jupiter were the 12mm and 6mm HM eyepieces with the 6mm winning this contest. Even though these are simple eyepieces and the eye relief of most, except maybe the Kellner, is, like a teacher of mine used to say, "for the birds", they perform rather well except the 4mm Ramsden.

 

Next step was checking the views with the same, or almost the same, focal length eyepieces of modern economical design and standard 1.25" barrels. This is the result:

 

20mm Plossl- at 60x this eyepiece showed an image that was equal in definition to the original 22mm Kellner. It had a wider field of view.

 

12mm Kellner- This volcano top Parks Kellner provided 100x and definitely a very sharp view of the planet with a wider field than the original 12.5mm HM.

 

9mm Kellner- This is an economical Meade eyepiece. At 133x it surpassed the original 9mm HM in all respects providing a dark field and no chromatic aberration at all. 

 

6mm Plossl- Another economical one. The view of the planet on this one was just as good as that of the original 6mm HM. Even the field of view looked similar. The planet was showing details in belts and zones at 200x.

 

4mm Plossl- At 300x this eyepiece was showing a crisp image of the planet without the chromatic aberration of the original 4mm Ramsden. This was expected from the much better corrected Plossl. I saw no image degradation at this power. Th excellent seeing and the position of the planet, just 20 degrees from my zenith, helped.

 

Summary- The economical 1.25" Kellners and Plossls outperformed the original eyepieces in terms of field of view and color correction. Nonetheless, the 6mm HM and 22mm Kellner could be considered outliers due to their excellent performance.

 

I repeated these observations with Saturn and the result was the same. These older Sear (AO) telescopes can perform very well with original eyepieces but when opting for higher powers a good set of economical Plossls are a must. Of course, orthoscopics do extra well. In fact I ended the session looking at the planets with the 6mm and 4mm UO orthos. 

 

All the time the telescope was hand driven using the slow motion cables and its "new" equatorial head (thanks Zane!). I kept the original counterweight and counterweight rod but the rest is a cleaned and refurbished mount. The one with the repaired telescope clamp that looked like a Frankenstein is now in the original telescope box. It has been honorably retired after 54 years. 

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 76mmmountB.JPG
  • 76mmeyepieces.JPG

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#7797 Terra Nova

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Posted 04 September 2021 - 10:49 AM

Great report Guido! People shouldn’t underestimate the heavy old H.M. 12.5mm, 9mm, and 6mm eyepieces. I’ve gotten excellent performance from them on solar system objects (planets, moon, and sun). For objects like these, when used with a long focus achromat in 0.965” format, the field is all ready restricted and the views are narrow field anyway. The complaints about the ‘soda straw’ views are much ado about nothing in my book! The complaints are just puffery. Also, there is very limited glass between the viewer and the target which is a boon to light transmission. The H.M. eyepiece design is far superior to the Ramsdens and they are also excellent for solar projection as the focal point lies outside of the eyepiece. 


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#7798 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 04 September 2021 - 11:27 AM

Finally, after weeks of clouds and rain, a clear night. I set up the Vixen 80L and waited for the planets to come up.

At 10PM I went out and started with Jupiter, but the seeing was rather poor. Saturn, being higher, was much better, but still not steady. So I did some double stars, carbon stars and clusters. With a scope this size it is easy to see why M11 is called the Wild Duck Cluster: very definitely a V shape to it. Carbon stars are good in this scope. The various red tones really come through.

Around midnight I went back to the planets because a high haze was starting to block out the stars. Now things had settled down and Saturn was high in the south, or as high as it gets up here. Really nice. The best views were at 133x with a 9mm LV. But having read Terra's post, I backed the magnification off to 30x and just looked at this tiny but exceedingly crisp and bright image for quite a while. Mesmerizing.

After a while I switched over to Jupiter. Here the best image was at 171x (7mm LV). I could see quite a it of banding, and some strong browns in the Equatorial area. But I really got the feeling that Jupiter is not as bold looking as it used to be. Maybe it is just that it is so far south and a lot gets absorbed by the atmosphere. Anyway, it was a nice if somewhat unsteady view, and a lot of detail was apparent.

Around 1AM the haze was worsening, so I called it a night. Maybe tonight will be better...
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#7799 kansas skies

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Posted 04 September 2021 - 01:15 PM

Hi Terra - Wednesday, I dug out a few old filters and did a mini comparisons on Jupiter. I made a similar observation as you at being able to make out more detail with #80A.

 

One thing that did surprise me was at how much detail a broad band deep sky filter brought out on Jupiter.

 

Steve T
 

I've always found visual images of Jupiter to benefit from a neutral density filter, as it tends to minimize the effects of floaters. Among my other filters, the one I found most amazing when viewing Jupiter was my Lumicon UHC. With this filter, the GRS went from very pale to a dark brown color. Most of the planets bands, along with many other features stood out in high contrast as well.

 

Bill


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#7800 kansas skies

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Posted 04 September 2021 - 01:33 PM


Summary- The economical 1.25" Kellners and Plossls outperformed the original eyepieces in terms of field of view and color correction. Nonetheless, the 6mm HM and 22mm Kellner could be considered outliers due to their excellent performance.

 

I still have quite a few of these older eyepieces as well, with many of my Kellners being my personal favorites. As can be seen from my collection of telescopes, I'm not really into wide, sweeping views, so these eyepieces suit me well. That being said, the biggest issue with these eyepiece designs is their tendency toward "ghosting", which I've found to vary somewhat depending upon the scope in use. I've found Orthoscopic eyepieces to be much better in this regard, while producing very similar results.

 

Bill

 


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