Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

  • Please log in to reply
7996 replies to this topic

#7801 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,835
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 04 September 2021 - 02:05 PM

Short evening of observing, with our first clear night in a while, so just looking at some favorites. Viewed Saturn and Jupiter with the 6" f9 and the C14. Was able to make out Titan, Rhea, Dione, Tethys, and Iapetus with both scopes. The C14 added Enceladus. Mimas was too close to the rings to reliably pull out. Six belts on Jupiter with both scopes, while the C14 brought out more color. I was comparing a NS 25mm ortho with the UO 24mm Koenig in the C14. The ortho gave bit more contrast, revealing a little more structure in the NEB, although it was harder to hold a good eye position with it. The Koenig was a bit warmer in tone. Moving on to some deep sky, the wider field of the Koenig was more advantageous. But for planetary, the ortho is a winner. With a fl of 3910mm, a 25mm gives 156X, which shows a nice sized disk, and it still has good eye relief. 

 

The 6", as always, gave a much better field for M31, M32, M110 and the double cluster, although the C14 made it easier to see the dark lane in M31. On M33, the 6" showed a faint smudge, while the C14 pulled out structure. M13 was resolved nearly as we'll in the 6" as in the C14, but at higher powers the extra light grasp of the larger scope kept the dazzle.

 

Chip W. 


  • Jacques, steve t, mdowns and 7 others like this

#7802 PawPaw

PawPaw

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 659
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2013
  • Loc: West Central Missouri

Posted 04 September 2021 - 02:42 PM

"This is from two nights ago but I hope it counts. It was the first clear night in many days of Saharan dust and heat indexes surpassing 100. It was not perfectly clear. There was a bit of the dusty haze there but the planets were out and as the night went on transparency improved. The dust cloud above was clearing. The seeing was excellent with a quiet atmosphere and no wind. It had rained during the day so the air was cool. I knew that dew would be a problem so the Sears 2535 76mm f/16 was out in original mount and with the 5 original eyepieces. I began observing Jupiter with each one and making notes about it. Here it goes:"

 

 

Guido your Sears 76mm looks NOS and beautiful.....is that a eyepiece tray light I see?  I too enjoy using the original .965 eyepieces as you know they certainly can vary in quality.  From your report it looks like yours are very nice quality.  Thanks for another excellent observing report!

 

Cheers

 

Don


Edited by PawPaw, 04 September 2021 - 02:46 PM.

  • steve t, kansas skies, oldmanastro and 2 others like this

#7803 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 966
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 04 September 2021 - 02:53 PM

I've always found visual images of Jupiter to benefit from a neutral density filter, as it tends to minimize the effects of floaters. Among my other filters, the one I found most amazing when viewing Jupiter was my Lumicon UHC. With this filter, the GRS went from very pale to a dark brown color. Most of the planets bands, along with many other features stood out in high contrast as well.

 

Bill

Thanks for the information, next clear night I'll give the Lumicon UHC a try on Jupiter. 


  • kansas skies and shredder1656 like this

#7804 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 890
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 04 September 2021 - 04:26 PM

"This is from two nights ago but I hope it counts. It was the first clear night in many days of Saharan dust and heat indexes surpassing 100. It was not perfectly clear. There was a bit of the dusty haze there but the planets were out and as the night went on transparency improved. The dust cloud above was clearing. The seeing was excellent with a quiet atmosphere and no wind. It had rained during the day so the air was cool. I knew that dew would be a problem so the Sears 2535 76mm f/16 was out in original mount and with the 5 original eyepieces. I began observing Jupiter with each one and making notes about it. Here it goes:"

 

 

Guido your Sears 76mm looks NOS and beautiful.....is that a eyepiece tray light I see?  I too enjoy using the original .965 eyepieces as you know they certainly can vary in quality.  From your report it looks like yours are very nice quality.  Thanks for another excellent observing report!

 

Cheers

 

Don

Thank you very much Don. The original tray light is right there. I seldom use it for fear of leaving the batteries in it but it works well. This telescope has an interesting history. I wrote an article for CN in 2010 about it at the time that I finally replaced the Edmund objective lens that I had in it with an original AO objective . Afterwards I refurbished the mount and tripod but the equatorial head had a repaired section of the tube clamp that looked awful. Just a week ago I was able to get a nice equatorial head to replace what someone rightfully called "the Frankenstein clamp" because of two protruding hex screws.

 

 

https://www.cloudyni...tronomers-r2351


  • steve t, PawPaw, Defenderslideguitar and 1 other like this

#7805 bjkaras

bjkaras

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 394
  • Joined: 24 May 2019
  • Loc: Back and forth between Santa Clara, CA and Las Vegas, NV

Posted 04 September 2021 - 11:01 PM

I’m going to drag out the 6” refractor tomorrow because Jupiter and Saturn are in good positions.


  • Jacques, steve t, mdowns and 3 others like this

#7806 highfnum

highfnum

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,387
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2006
  • Loc: NE USA

Posted 05 September 2021 - 06:04 AM

edmund 3 inch f15  quark Ha 

Capture 2021-09-04T11_52_42ed3290.jpg


  • Jacques, Erik Bakker, clamchip and 12 others like this

#7807 clamchip

clamchip

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,551
  • Joined: 09 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Seattle

Posted 05 September 2021 - 10:34 AM

Jupiter and Saturn every chance I get.

Right now they are in perfect view between the cedars and the firs and high enough to

clear the big maple.

Its been a slow rolling boil, even so most of the nights I can use useful magnification.

I'm so happy I can use my C8. I keep my fingers crossed the temp doesn't do anything drastic.

I haven't needed a dew shield yet, and my shop where I keep my scope is about the same temp

as outdoor.

My slow boil may be from the big maple, not much I can do about that. I could transport my

lazy buttocks to a better site, my C8 is completely portable.

 

Robert 


  • steve t, Terra Nova, kansas skies and 4 others like this

#7808 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 890
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 05 September 2021 - 02:31 PM

Another opportunity presented itself yesterday with a clear but hazy night. I could only see a few stars in the Sagittarius teapot. I knew that the haze meant a quiet atmosphere so I tried my luck on the planets. With a low, by our standards, 66% humidity, there was no problem with dew. I took Scruffy, the Celestar out for some visuals of the planets and some images. 

 

The first target was Jupiter. The haze did not disappoint. The seeing was excellent and the planet came into a crisp focus with the 16mm Konig. Io was transiting at the time with its shadow clearly delineated in the upper reaches of Jupiter's atmosphere. Several belts and zones were clearly visible with details in the equatorial zone and the NEB and SEB borders. The polar regions were also exhibiting nice detail. At this time the GRS was not in the picture yet. I tried several eyepiece combinations and decided that the 6mm UO ortho or a combination of the 12mm Parks Kellner and a 2X Barlow (basically the same magnification as the UO) brought up a great amount of detail and a very sharp image. I spent sometime on Jupiter before getting an image using the 2X Barlow. The image shows the transiting IO and if you look to the right of the shadow Io is right there.

 

I left Jupiter after taking several images and doing some more visual observing. Saturn came next. It was stunning with the 18mm Konig at 111x but then, when is Saturn not stunning in any telescope? It was even more stunning for me the first time I saw it with my 60mm refractor back in 66. With the Celestar I could see four satellites, Titan, Rhea, Dionne and Thetis. Enceladus escaped me probably due to the hazy conditions. In fact Thetis was observed most of the time using averted vision. The planet itself was showing several bands and even the polar region. The rings were showing the Encke division and careful observation revealed the Crepe ring, that thin veil that looks just a little bit brighter than the dark sky separating the planet from the rings. I took a couple of images with the 2X and 3X Barlows. The 3X was pushing it a little bit but the image came out ok. Saturn can keep you occupied for along time just observing its majesty. 

 

After Saturn I returned to Jupiter and found that the GRS had started to transit. The 6mm UO ortho (333x) showed quite a lot of detail and activity around the Great Red Spot. With the planet even at a higher altitude and a few degrees for my zenith, the views now were even sharper than before. I was able to image the GRS with success and I also found out that the screen image of the planet was sharp enough to see a lot of details that escaped the eye. After a couple more images I stayed with Jupiter a long time trying to discern more detail with the old eyes. The tiny cataract in my left eye becomes intrusive at low powers but not so at high powers. This is my dominant eye. I had to train my right eye to observe. It was well past midnight when I called it quits. The sky was clear of clouds but the haze obscured most of the stars except the bright ones. At midnight I could not see any stars from my zenith down toward the east.

 

Scruffy the Celestar did a good job even though he's not a good looker as the image shows.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Jupiter2021-9-5-0137-200mm2X.jpg
  • Jupiter2021-9-5-0355-200mm2X.jpg
  • Saturn2021-9-5-0245-200mm2X.jpg
  • Scruffy.JPG

Edited by oldmanastro, 06 September 2021 - 09:21 AM.

  • Jacques, davidmcgo, Erik Bakker and 17 others like this

#7809 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 966
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 05 September 2021 - 02:50 PM

Just got in from observing the Sun, with the 4" Newtonian. It has really broken out in spots. I counted four groups and 19 individual spots.


  • Jacques, mdowns, Terra Nova and 4 others like this

#7810 Bonco2

Bonco2

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 762
  • Joined: 01 Jun 2013

Posted 05 September 2021 - 03:50 PM

Guido, I hope you realize that your photo's rival those taken by the largest observatories when we were kids. Nice job!

Bill


  • steve t, PawPaw, oldmanastro and 2 others like this

#7811 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 890
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 05 September 2021 - 08:39 PM

Guido, I hope you realize that your photo's rival those taken by the largest observatories when we were kids. Nice job!

Bill

Thanks Bill. I guess that anyone with a good telescope and digital camera can take good images of the planets today. The capture and processing software is free and user friendly. These newer cameras are really good too. I have to try the camera with the classic refractors now. Here's a photo taken with one of my favorite classics, the 200" Palomar telescope. The image is from the 50s. Look at the size of the GRS in those times. The Hale Telescope now has adaptive optics. It must be taking awesome images. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • JupiterPalomar.jpg

  • Jacques, highfnum, godelescher and 3 others like this

#7812 Bonco2

Bonco2

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 762
  • Joined: 01 Jun 2013

Posted 05 September 2021 - 08:48 PM

Guido,

 You and others here are posting some wonderful images using technology to create beautiful pictures. These are showing the optic quality of some of these old classics. I'm envious. BTW I've been observing Jupiter since the 50's. The GRS was bigger and darker back in the day and the pic you posted shows that. In my RV6 it was brick red and dominated all the other features of the planet. The equitorial belts were thicker and darker too, as shown in the Hale photo.

Bill


  • steve t, PawPaw, oldmanastro and 1 other like this

#7813 Kokatha man

Kokatha man

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15,917
  • Joined: 13 Sep 2009
  • Loc: "cooker-ta man" downunda...

Posted 05 September 2021 - 08:59 PM

Pulled the little Pentax 50x600 out again today to look at the Sun...using the SOHO image to explain, here is what we saw around 11am with a low, early-Spring viewing.....followed by another about 10 minutes later as the Sun rose slightly & seeing obviously improved. wink.gif

 

SunspotObsReportSept.6th2021.png

 

 


  • Jacques, steve t, mdowns and 8 others like this

#7814 Bonco2

Bonco2

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 762
  • Joined: 01 Jun 2013

Posted 05 September 2021 - 09:08 PM

FINALLY!!!

Yes a clear night after sunset for many months. I saw the skies clearing in the PM and decided I could finally set up to observe Jupiter and Saturn. Chose my Unitron 128 and had a good hour and a half in fairly steady skies and wonderful transparency.  Mainly used 1.25's in the Unihex and the 7mm Meade RG provided the best views. Viewed several bands on Jupiter and observed one moon going into eclipse on one side of the planet while another came out of eclipse on the other side.  Saturn was sharp and the 60mm easily showed the Cassini division. Reminded me of my first views with a 60mm Sears some 60+ years ago.

Next I repeated the views with .965 Unitron eyepieces. Surprisingly good comparable views especially with the 7mm, but  the 6mm seemed to break down. I think it's the eyepiece. Why? Because my 4.8mm Nagler held up better  to higher magnification. Also when  using .965's the 7mm has always out performed the 6mm.  Sure was nice to get back to my favorite passion.

Bill


  • Jacques, steve t, mdowns and 7 others like this

#7815 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,237
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, LA (Lower Alabama)

Posted 05 September 2021 - 11:24 PM

Jupiter & The Galileans - Tonight at 1950L:

 

Jupiter - 20210905 1950L.jpg  

 

I don't check the guides before heading out, so imagine my surprise & joy when Jupiter got above the oaks:  GRS + Disk Transits + Shadow Transits; and, my 1988 Tak FC-100 cut through the roiling & riotous air to show it all.  Pure white sharp disks, jet black shadows, salmon GRS, and colorful belts.  Fantastic start to the night!  At 100x (Rad 8mm), the disk of Ganymede was clearly larger than Europa.  At 200x, add barges, festoons, & tails to the view, and it really was too much.  And from a 4" F8 refractor...

 

And, before Jupiter, the FC delivered 4 Moons of Saturn -- right at sunset -- and at just 53x (Paradigm 15mm).  8+ Seeing can make a big difference.  Cassini Arc the longest I've seen in a while.  On the meridian, and at 267x (Brandon 6 + Tak Barlow), from S - N, light gray, tan, rose, & olive belts -- the best view I've gotten with my "new" FC-100 so far...

 

For Deep Sky, I used my Triple Nickle 5" F5 non-ED Triplet RFT.  Got what may be my last looks at M4, M13 & M92 before they hit the light pollution dome (we have another solid week of clouds & rain starting tomorrow) and/or the Moon returns.  When The Dumbbell fills 1/3 of the field at 80x (RKE 8), I know the air is very clear.  The Ring was bright & obvious at just 23x (RKE 28).  I don't think I missed any Messiers from Altair to Antares, but I did lose count... 

 

Between these 2 fracs, I saw so much stuff tonight that my brain is full. 


Edited by Bomber Bob, 06 September 2021 - 06:47 AM.

  • Jacques, steve t, mdowns and 4 others like this

#7816 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 25,560
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: 39.07°N, 229m AMSL, USA

Posted 06 September 2021 - 06:29 AM

Venus, Jupiter and Saturn again last night here. We have a huge Labor Day Weekend fireworks show here over the River about two miles northwest of me. We watched them from my deck. Has anyone noticed how high Venus is all of the sudden?! I guess I hadn’t been paying much attention to the western sky in the evening lately and then yesterday, BOOM, there it was! I’ve also noticed that Jupiter and Saturn seem to be five to ten degrees higher this year. They are in a much better observing position. I was inspired by Bill (Bonco2) to take out my little old 62mm Unitron last night. I have rings and an ADM short rail that fit it nicely and so I had it on my TV Panoramic mount and ashwood tripod that I keep in my dining room. It’s a very nice ride for the Unitron and it’s native mount and tripod remain in their separate wooden cabinet most of the time. I also have an extra drawtube, (the shorter one) fitted with one of the Astronomy Shoppe’s 1.25” visual backs, and so I was using the Uni with my 1.25” Takahashi prism star diagonal and my circle T volcano top orthos. The little scope performed admirably! Almost apo-like and very sharp and contrasty. The sky was in pretty good shape with better than expected transparency and stability given the Holiday mega-pyrotechnic hoop-la. Not aiming the telescope in that direction helped. Saturn was lovely in the stark blackness of the surrounding sky. And Jupiter put on a nice show with it’s shadow transit. I didn’t see it thru and went in around 11:30. 


Edited by Terra Nova, 06 September 2021 - 02:13 PM.

  • Jacques, Erik Bakker, steve t and 12 others like this

#7817 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 966
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 06 September 2021 - 08:18 AM

The skies in SW Ohio were unsteady last night so I didn't spend any time on Jupiter, but instead estimated a few variable stars in the Lyra and Cygnus region along with side trips to some old favorite DSOs.

 

Currently waiting for the Sun to clear the trees, so I can check on the current sunspots. The Sun has shown more activity in  than I've seen in the past. Maximum may be interesting this cycle.


  • Jacques, mdowns, Terra Nova and 4 others like this

#7818 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 890
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 06 September 2021 - 09:33 AM

Guido,

 You and others here are posting some wonderful images using technology to create beautiful pictures. These are showing the optic quality of some of these old classics. I'm envious. BTW I've been observing Jupiter since the 50's. The GRS was bigger and darker back in the day and the pic you posted shows that. In my RV6 it was brick red and dominated all the other features of the planet. The equitorial belts were thicker and darker too, as shown in the Hale photo.

Bill

Bill,

 

  I observed the GRS for the first time in 67 with my then new 76mm f/16 Sears telescope. It was indeed bigger and I remember being quite exited about being able to see it. The RV6 has always been a great scope. Bringing one here in those times was very costly because it had to be brought by air freight. I finally got one in 1994 as a gift from a good friend who picked it up at a local garage sale. He disassembled it to do a restoration but never got to it. The telescope came to me in parts over a period of almost two years as he found them around a very messy workshop. Unfortunately I don't know its early history. Just recently I had the mirrors recoated. The telescope performs admirably. 


  • Jacques, Erik Bakker, steve t and 6 others like this

#7819 scrufy

scrufy

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 128
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019

Posted 06 September 2021 - 09:42 PM

I felt like setting up my older stuff last night and used my Monolux with the original .965 eyepieces on an Advanced GT mount to see Jupiter and Saturn for a couple hours.

It was nice that there was a shadow transit as well as 3 very visible moons.


  • Jacques, steve t, paul m schofield and 7 others like this

#7820 cambutton

cambutton

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 41
  • Joined: 01 Jan 2021
  • Loc: Tacoma Washington

Posted 07 September 2021 - 01:35 PM

I mounted the C100 to experiment with a barlow while viewing Saturn, and Jupiter.

 

I saw the giant red spot! Sadly I cannot make out the Cassini division.

 

An old 25mm orthoscopic Celestron made in Japan is my new favorite eyepiece, and with a barlow I could see the different bands of Jupiter and the giant spot.

 

I was trying to find a new Messier M15. I found a nice field of stars, but M15 was likely further South.

 

Have a great day,

 

Cam  


  • Jacques, steve t, paul m schofield and 6 others like this

#7821 clamchip

clamchip

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,551
  • Joined: 09 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Seattle

Posted 09 September 2021 - 12:39 AM

I've been using the Sky & Telescope Saturn's moons tool after I observe.

You could use the tool before or during observation and it would probably make more sense for productive

scientific research. I like the surprise of not having any idea where they are and then using the tool to

confirm afterwards:

https://skyandtelesc...script-utility/

Here's one for Jupiter too:

https://skyandtelesc...ns/jupiter.html

 

Robert 


Edited by clamchip, 09 September 2021 - 12:52 AM.

  • steve t, Terra Nova, kansas skies and 4 others like this

#7822 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 25,560
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: 39.07°N, 229m AMSL, USA

Posted 09 September 2021 - 07:11 AM

Not exactly a classic telescope, but two classic telescopes put together kinda sorta; I was out last night observing Jupiter and Saturn with my classic 50+ y.o. Zeiss Oberkochen 15x60s, mounted on my Benro S4 fluid head on my Benro Tall carbon-fiber tripod. The views were just lovely, sharp, high contrast, with a black surrounding sky. Jupiter presented its darker NEB and SEB banding and four Galilean satellites, and amazingly, Saturn’s rings were definitely discernible with the dark sky seen between orb and bands, with is pretty amazing for 15X binoculars. This little outfit is Guerrilla Astronomy at its best, sharp as a tack and light as a feather. I’d searched for a pair of these binos for years and finally found them right here on CN a few months ago. I’d wanted a pair since I was a teenager and looked through one that belonged to my neighbor-friend’s grandfather.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 56E1EAB2-9BE6-4FD3-8468-73FCAD20DB3B.jpeg

Edited by Terra Nova, 09 September 2021 - 07:17 AM.

  • Jacques, clamchip, Corcaroli78 and 8 others like this

#7823 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 25,560
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: 39.07°N, 229m AMSL, USA

Posted 09 September 2021 - 07:46 AM

I've been using the Sky & Telescope Saturn's moons tool after I observe.

You could use the tool before or during observation and it would probably make more sense for productive

scientific research. I like the surprise of not having any idea where they are and then using the tool to

confirm afterwards:

https://skyandtelesc...script-utility/

Here's one for Jupiter too:

https://skyandtelesc...ns/jupiter.html

 

Robert 

I use an app on my iPhone and iPad called Gas Giants that does Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. You can get generic time-step views over a range of +/- 48 hrs, and it can also be customized to give you the view through a particular telescope/eyepiece combination, also correct image, inverted, or right-left reversed. It’s a perfect app to use not only while observing but also for seeing what you missed or seeing what’s coming up and planning an observing session.


  • clamchip, steve t, oldmanastro and 2 others like this

#7824 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,835
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 09 September 2021 - 08:50 AM

Sky Safari also shows the positions of the moons, eclipses, and GRS transits if you zoom in enough.

 

Chip W. 


  • shredder1656 likes this

#7825 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 890
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 09 September 2021 - 09:20 AM

I use an app on my iPhone and iPad called Gas Giants that does Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. You can get generic time-step views over a range of +/- 48 hrs, and it can also be customized to give you the view through a particular telescope/eyepiece combination, also correct image, inverted, or right-left reversed. It’s a perfect app to use not only while observing but also for seeing what you missed or seeing what’s coming up and planning an observing session.

Thanks Terra. I just downloaded the Gas Giants application. It's excellent. I also use S&T's interactive tools. A binocular showing a dark background and banding details on Jupiter at 15X must be of excellent quality.


  • Terra Nova and shredder1656 like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics