Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

  • Please log in to reply
7996 replies to this topic

#7826 clamchip

clamchip

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,551
  • Joined: 09 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Seattle

Posted 09 September 2021 - 10:05 AM

I yearn for the old days, one wife, one car, one telescope.

Tonight, if the weather holds, I'm going to relive some of that with a 4 inch f/15 refractor.

Why I torture myself with this endless comparisons, I don't know how Ed Ting can do it.

 

Robert


Edited by clamchip, 09 September 2021 - 10:06 AM.

  • Jacques, steve t, mdowns and 4 others like this

#7827 Paul Sweeney

Paul Sweeney

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 640
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Heidelberg, Germany

Posted 09 September 2021 - 10:15 AM

I took out the good ol' Vixen 80L to check out the sunspots. The group in the middle has some really nice details. Glad to see that the sunspot cycle is finally getting started.
  • Jacques, steve t, PawPaw and 4 others like this

#7828 Defenderslideguitar

Defenderslideguitar

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,503
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted 09 September 2021 - 12:17 PM

Clamchip argues to keep it simple I think.....

 One scope at a time seems simple enough though having two set up may be the norm

Lately  I have seen nada

   If I go out at all this weekend it will be a smaller single scope

  More foolishness here as flooding storms came last week   and  as I  tried to use tarps to cover Garage repair work we are doing at my daughter's house         and   well      I managed to fall off a ladder onto a Belgian block lining the sidewalk... Landing on my back  I was stunned...dazed but not confused.............after a time I managed to get up and go home and put ice on it... trying to tough it out    with Aleve   ice    rest   working some half days   for almost a week   call it embarrassed denial     it was not getting any better        I finally went to the Ortho Specialty Group where I am well known................turns out I have an obvious Lumbar fracture and now I am home They made fun of me calling me tough guy trying to tough it out........a nickname I kind of liked    but stubborn male might be more accurate......

 

When the sky clears this weekend  we may be going small if at all

     C-80  or FC -76


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 09 September 2021 - 12:28 PM.

  • Jacques, clamchip, steve t and 8 others like this

#7829 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,237
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, LA (Lower Alabama)

Posted 09 September 2021 - 12:25 PM

Once upon a time, Ole BB was a rational person, but since 2016, the NWS (National Weather Service) has been on a covert mission to make me superstitious...  Forecast is for 4 consecutive nights of "mostly clear" skies...  Yes, TD Mindy has pushed across the Deep South, and is hovering off the coast of GA; but, yet another Tropical Low has formed in the central Gulf -- about 300 miles due south of Lake Charles, LA -- and it's pumping a steady stream of clouds my way...  Will a cold line push the stream SE, and out of the way?  In the Summer, and at The Swamp?  Not too likely!

 

But just in case, I checked the condition & collimation of my 1980s Meade 826's mirrors, and moved it to the shed.  Like my 1988 Tak FC-100, and my 1980s C80P & C102, I haven't done any imaging yet with the refractor-like Newt; so, if I get a chance, I'll try the new SVBONY 205 camera on Saturn & Jupiter at the meridian...  The 826 joins my C102 and my Triple Nickle 1970s 5" F5 non-ED Triplet at the Ready Line.  The waxing Moon sets around 2100L tonight, so I'll have deep-sky covered, along with the Big Gas Giants...

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Paradigm SHIFT...

 

Hat's Off to our Sponsor!  I ordered 2 more A-T Paradigm 1.25" eyepieces from Astronomics on TUES evening, and they were delivered yesterday morning.  Pretty Dang Fast in my book!

 

I added the 8mm & 3.2mm to my set, and I got to test these last night in my 1980s Celestron (V) C102 F101970s Triple Nickle 5" F5 non-ED RFT, and my 1980s Meade 826 8" F6 Newt.  Overall, these eyepieces are better than my RKEs, and almost as good as my Tele Vue Radians in my old scopes.  Flatter fields, more than double the eye-relief, and truer colors than the RKE 8mm; and, about half the weight of my Radian 8mm & 4mm...

 

At sunset I had my C102 + Mizar SP set up on the SE porch to grab Saturn, then Jupiter.  Seeing varied with the thin streamer clouds -- 7'ish at best.  In this old frac, the 8mm = 125x, and the 3.2mm = 312x.  I saw Titan + 2 Moons at 125x; 312x added a 3rd Moon, and Cassini's arc extended further; 3 Belts in various shades of gray.  Jupiter stole the show!  2 Galileans almost touching, a bright salmon GRS @ 80x (Para 15mm) that faded toward light gray at 125x, and light gray @ 312x.  Best Views at 125x in my Brandon 8mm; most comfortable view with the Radian 8mm & 4mm; but, the Para eyepieces aren't a mile behind the Radians.  Once I saw that, I put the TV's back in the case...

 

1980s Meade 826 = 2017 APM 152ED

 

I saw so much stuff with the 826 last night...  Overall, its best views were equivalent to that APM 152ED F8 that I owned & loved -- on every stinking object type!!

 

But before I started testing the Paradigms in it, I did one last collimation, using a UO HD 6mm Ortho (200x) on Altair & Vega, and made micro-fractional corrections -- mainly to the secondary.

 

Paradigm Results (826)

 

- 25mm (48x):  Delphinus Double-Double is eye-watering.  M27 is big & bright; north lobe is smaller than the south; small bright clumps in both lobes, but easier to see in the south.

- 15mm (80x):  OMG!  So. Many. Pinpoint. Stars.  The sheer number of clusters in & around Aquila -- seemed like every other field.  Saturn showed Titan + 3 Moons, 3 belts (gray-olive, lilac, & salmon).  Jupiter has 7 belts (brown, yellow-brown, light orange, rust, & blue-gray), light RED GRS.

- 8mm (150x):  Fine Details in & out in Saturn's NEB, and ditto for the Crepe / C Ring (tough to keep my eye from wandering!); olive & browns most prominent belts colors.  Jupiter has 10 belts; GRS has more light gray in it than pink, and I can see a thin interior line that's slightly darker than the material between it & the much thicker & darker outer edge.

- 3.2mm (375x):  "Soft" until Saturn got well west of the meridian, and into calmer air.  Jupiter is higher, and in much better air, and I count a dozen belts; zones are shades of white -- more details than I can sketch.

 

Just for Fun, I put my Radian 4 in the Tak 2x Barlow, and attempted Jupiter at 600x in the 826...  Big, Soft, & Dim!  But, 400x with the Brandon 6 + Tak Barlow was sharper than 375x with the Para 3.2mm eyepiece -- but every time I blinked, my lashes swept the field lens! 


Edited by Bomber Bob, 10 September 2021 - 11:43 AM.

  • Jacques, steve t, Terra Nova and 5 others like this

#7830 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,237
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, LA (Lower Alabama)

Posted 09 September 2021 - 12:30 PM

Clamchip argues to keep it simple I think.....

 One scope at a time seems simple enough though having two set up may be the norm

Lately  I have seen nada

   If I go out at all this weekend it will be a smaller single scope

  More foolishness here as flooding storms came last week   and  as I  tried to use tarps to cover Garage repair work we are doing at my daughter's house         and   well      I managed to fall off a ladder onto a Belgian block lining the sidewalk... Landing on my back  I was stunned...dazed but not confused.............after a time I managed to get up and go home and put ice on it... trying to tough it out    working some half days   for almost a week   call it embarrassed denial     it was not getting any better        I finally went to the Orto Specialty Group where I am well known................turns out I have an obvious Lumbar fracture and now I am home They made fun of me calling me tough guy trying to tough it out........a nickname I kind of liked    but stubborn male might be more accurate......

 

When the sky clears this weekend  we may be going small if at all

     C-80  or FC -76

YOUCH!!!   "Tough" only applies to Golden Corral Steaks at our age!   Hate to hear about your fall -- I hope you'll take it easy, and let your body heal.

 

Y'all have raved so much about the venerable Tak FC-76 that I came very close to buying one last week.  (I knew that if I didn't buy a Mizar FA-80 blue tube, I'd be tempted by yet another Tak!)  I bet I went back to that ad a dozen times in an hour...


Edited by Bomber Bob, 09 September 2021 - 12:30 PM.

  • Defenderslideguitar likes this

#7831 Piggyback

Piggyback

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,292
  • Joined: 14 Sep 2013
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 09 September 2021 - 01:13 PM

IMG_5312.JPG

 

Had a short peek at the sun in H-Alpha. Telemator and DayStar .7 A H-Alpha Filter attached. Nice to see sun activity coming alive. Lots of fiddling to get this combo going but I'm slowly getting there.

 


  • Jacques, Corcaroli78, steve t and 11 others like this

#7832 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,835
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 09 September 2021 - 02:56 PM

 I managed to fall off a ladder onto a Belgian block lining the sidewalk... Landing on my back  I was stunned...dazed but not confused.............after a time I managed to get up and go home and put ice on it... trying to tough it out    with Aleve   ice    rest   working some half days   for almost a week   call it embarrassed denial     it was not getting any better        I finally went to the Ortho Specialty Group where I am well known................turns out I have an obvious Lumbar fracture and now I am home They made fun of me calling me tough guy trying to tough it out........a nickname I kind of liked    but stubborn male might be more accurate......

 

When the sky clears this weekend  we may be going small if at all

     C-80  or FC -76

Don't push yourself! Spinal fractures don't like to be ignored. They will demand your attention if they feel neglected. This is especially poor timing with a new 6" scope also calling for your attention. But if you heed its call, the lumbar will get jealous and refuse to ever let you have anything to do with it. Give it plenty of time to heal. 

 

Stay well! (And off of tall ladders too!)

 

Chip W. 


  • Defenderslideguitar and shredder1656 like this

#7833 Defenderslideguitar

Defenderslideguitar

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,503
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted 09 September 2021 - 03:05 PM

Roger that

Thanks Chip 


  • shredder1656 likes this

#7834 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 25,560
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: 39.07°N, 229m AMSL, USA

Posted 09 September 2021 - 03:40 PM

Roger that

Thanks Chip 

Ouch! That had to hurt! And a back injury in a pain in the back that you don’t need! I’m glad you finally went to the doctor. Next time, don’t wait so long! I hope you’re feeling better soon Barry.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 3A297119-55E4-45C2-A921-3E90B4735069.jpeg

Edited by Terra Nova, 09 September 2021 - 03:43 PM.

  • Jacques, John Rogers, clamchip and 5 others like this

#7835 RichA

RichA

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,384
  • Joined: 03 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Toronto, Canada

Posted 09 September 2021 - 04:14 PM

I observed the sun and was elated (finally) to see a number of spots.  I used a 70mm f7 telescope made using an uncoated apo triplet brass lens of unknown vintage, but at least 70 years old. 


  • Jacques, steve t, kansas skies and 3 others like this

#7836 Defenderslideguitar

Defenderslideguitar

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,503
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted 09 September 2021 - 04:43 PM

Thanks so much Terra.....................


  • Terra Nova likes this

#7837 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 890
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 09 September 2021 - 10:16 PM

Clamchip argues to keep it simple I think.....

 One scope at a time seems simple enough though having two set up may be the norm

Lately  I have seen nada

   If I go out at all this weekend it will be a smaller single scope

  More foolishness here as flooding storms came last week   and  as I  tried to use tarps to cover Garage repair work we are doing at my daughter's house         and   well      I managed to fall off a ladder onto a Belgian block lining the sidewalk... Landing on my back  I was stunned...dazed but not confused.............after a time I managed to get up and go home and put ice on it... trying to tough it out    with Aleve   ice    rest   working some half days   for almost a week   call it embarrassed denial     it was not getting any better        I finally went to the Ortho Specialty Group where I am well known................turns out I have an obvious Lumbar fracture and now I am home They made fun of me calling me tough guy trying to tough it out........a nickname I kind of liked    but stubborn male might be more accurate......

 

When the sky clears this weekend  we may be going small if at all

     C-80  or FC -76

Sorry about that unfortunate accident! Follow your orthopedic's instruction to the last line and above all, take care and take it easy. Definitely, only small scopes allowed.


  • Defenderslideguitar likes this

#7838 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 25,560
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: 39.07°N, 229m AMSL, USA

Posted 10 September 2021 - 07:34 AM

I was out again last night for a half hour or so before I went to bed. I had my classic Zeiss Oberkochen 15x60s out with me again, this time hand-held while lying back on a chaise lounge on the deck and while seated on a lawn chair in the backyard, the armrests of both providing nice support. The air was clear and still. My targets were once again Jupiter and Saturn; then the Lagoon and Trifid Nebulas in Sagittarius; three globulars- M5 in Serpens Caput, M4 in Scorpius, and M13 in Hercules; the planetary Dumbell nebula M27 in Vulpecula; the Double Cluster in Perseus and the Wild Duck cluster in Scutum; and the Andromeda Galexy M31. More or less, it was a quick tour, but fun none the less. It’s like looking through two excellent 60mm RFTs at once.


  • Jacques, Corcaroli78, steve t and 6 others like this

#7839 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 966
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 10 September 2021 - 07:48 AM

Last night I was too tired to set up the scope, but right after  sunset the crescent Moon and Venus made a nice pair on the western horizon.


  • Jacques, Terra Nova, PawPaw and 4 others like this

#7840 steve t

steve t

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 966
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 10 September 2021 - 10:23 AM

Clamchip argues to keep it simple I think.....

 One scope at a time seems simple enough though having two set up may be the norm

Lately  I have seen nada

   If I go out at all this weekend it will be a smaller single scope

  More foolishness here as flooding storms came last week   and  as I  tried to use tarps to cover Garage repair work we are doing at my daughter's house         and   well      I managed to fall off a ladder onto a Belgian block lining the sidewalk... Landing on my back  I was stunned...dazed but not confused.............after a time I managed to get up and go home and put ice on it... trying to tough it out    with Aleve   ice    rest   working some half days   for almost a week   call it embarrassed denial     it was not getting any better        I finally went to the Ortho Specialty Group where I am well known................turns out I have an obvious Lumbar fracture and now I am home They made fun of me calling me tough guy trying to tough it out........a nickname I kind of liked    but stubborn male might be more accurate......

 

When the sky clears this weekend  we may be going small if at all

     C-80  or FC -76

Sorry to hear about your accident and hope you're feeling better.


  • Defenderslideguitar likes this

#7841 clamchip

clamchip

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,551
  • Joined: 09 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Seattle

Posted 10 September 2021 - 10:25 AM

I was all set up with my Jaegers/Carton 4 inch f/15 but it never did clear up.

Thru the overcast I could see Jupiter and Saturn fairly well, enough to see

major details.

I checked the optical tube's overall alignment and collimation with Polaris, looks

fine after not being used for a few years. 

I'm afraid my C8 has kinda spoilt me, I forgot about the 'chasing of the eyepiece'

with the 5ft long tube of the refractor. One minute I'm on the highest rung of my star

chair, the next I'm on the bottom rung. I also have two finders for this scope

on a quick change finder mount, a 90 and a straight through to help with the

gymnastics. On the positive side it is good exercise for the neck and lower

back which I desperately need, these areas are stiff says my physical

therapist.

Robert

 

post-50896-0-92808100-1491788066.jpg


Edited by clamchip, 10 September 2021 - 10:26 AM.

  • Jacques, steve t, RichA and 9 others like this

#7842 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,237
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, LA (Lower Alabama)

Posted 10 September 2021 - 01:33 PM

New A-T Paradigms & Old Scopes...

 

The new Paradigm eyepieces are cheap, but they don't look cheap, and the views are much better than I expected.

 

I bought the C80P & C102 for Public Sharing / Viewing, and the Para's do well in these old Vixen refractors.  And, the form factor (soft caps, big & easy to grip) + largish eye relief will keep visitors from poking their eyes out...

 

Triple Nickle Compatibility...

 

My 5" F5 non-ED Triplet is near-APO at the center of field, but stars start to stretch & streak towards the edge -- but, NOT with the Para 15mm / 8mm / 3.2mm eyepieces.  95% of the field is flat & un-distorted.  That was a pleasant surprise last night, and better than my RKEs -- my go-to trio for this RFT.  25mm = 26x / 15mm =  43x / 8mm = Exactly 80x / 3.2mm = Exactly 200x.  My TN5 ain't a Tak fluorite, but with these "ED" Para's, color correction near C-O-F is very close to natural -- Jupiter @ 200x in a 5" refractor is... sweet.  And, bright!   IOW:  The Para's make the TN5 much more versatile; and, as it's already a heavy old scope, don't add much to the load -- my old Orion VersaGo 2 carries the kit with ease.

 

I look forward to testing the Para's on the Moon in my Outstanding 1964 Sears (AO) 76mm F16 at First Quarter.

 

Dang It!  ALL that writing about my incomparable Meade 826, and I forgot to pick-at CHAS for ever parting with it...  CHAS -- Dude!  What were you thinking?!!  (There.  Now, I'm done.)


Edited by Bomber Bob, 10 September 2021 - 02:36 PM.

  • Jacques, steve t, mdowns and 4 others like this

#7843 PawPaw

PawPaw

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 659
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2013
  • Loc: West Central Missouri

Posted 10 September 2021 - 03:50 PM

9/9..Observing start time 8:05, humidity 65%.  End time 11:10, humidity 83%.  Skies look good visually but seeing was at best average to below average.  Double star testing was good to start and went downhill fast. 

 

Equipment:

Goto 12.5 CM reflector mounted on Mark-X .  Eyepieces Goto MH 25mm, 12.5mm, 6mm, OR 9mm, 6mm and 4mm.

Goto 106 Sane as 12.5

 

Not surprisingly the reflector faired much better then the refractor.  the 12.5 split Pi Aquilae cleanly with the MH and OR 6mm.  I could discern separation with the MH 12.5.  I moved onto Zeta Aquarius with a clean split with the 12.5.

Pi Aquilae was just a bridge too far for the model 106 but enlongation was observed with the MH and OR 6mm.  Difficulty was compounded with no drive on the mount.  Zeta Aquarius was a clean split with 6mm's.  With 45 minutes into the session dew was descending and fast.  I swung higher to Zeta Cygnus and could tell everything was going downhill.  Neither scope could provide any clear definition.  The diffraction rings were breaking apart with spikes.  I moved to Jupiter and Saturn and both were OK but the details was muddled.  Very few moments of steady views.  While on the 106 I noticed the definite haze surrounding both Jupiter and Saturn and sure enough a look at the objective with red light showed not just fog but dew droplets on the objective.  So I pointed the 106 horizontal and confined my viewing with the 12.5.  I finally gave up around 11 pm as the tube was drenched in dew almost as if it rained.  On the plus side It is such a pleasure to use the Mark-x mount.  

 

Cheers

 

Don


  • Jacques, clamchip, mdowns and 4 others like this

#7844 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,835
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 10 September 2021 - 10:04 PM

Venus was high enough to see from the observatory, but there's a layer of turbulence making everything very wobbly near the horizon. Obviously at quarter phase, but not much else to see. Same with the crescent moon - details badly blurred. Jupiter showed about four wavy bands, Cassini was in-and-out and only five moons were visible in the C14. The 6"f9 was better on the rings, but not as good on the moons. Neptune showed a disk in both scopes. 

 

Izar, Rasalgethi, and Almach all split beautifully in the refractor. The cat was able to split them too, but the increased brightness washed out the colors and made the gaps look smaller. The sky was also bright. Although M81 and M82 were visible, NGC3077 was nearly impossible to pull out of the background. It was also pretty busy in that little spot of the sky - 5 satellites passed through in about 2 minutes. Four were on parallel paths, so I assume a starlink cluster, but one went through nearly perpendicular to the others. 

 

Nice views of half a dozen globulars. M15 was especially nice in the C14. The double cluster sparkled in the 6". The local group galaxies were also lovely. 

 

Highlight of the evening was tracking down Barnard's star, which I'd never done before. Not terribly exciting to look at, but just a cool (literally and figuratively) object. 

 

Chip W. 


  • Jacques, clamchip, PawPaw and 5 others like this

#7845 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,237
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, LA (Lower Alabama)

Posted 10 September 2021 - 11:32 PM

Cloud-dodging tonight, so no incomparable Meade 826.  And, I swapped out the C102 for the Mizar GT-80S F7 achro, to continue testing the A-T Paradigm [PAR] eyepieces.  The F10 C102's focus range is generous compared with the GT's, which is more like my 2 x Tak F8 APOs.

 

Seeing?  What's that?!  Overall, not a Fuzzy Night; and, at times, not much of a planetary night, either.  (So much for the NWS's Mostly Clear for 4 consecutive nights!)

 

Paradigms in the GT-80S:  

 

- 25mm = 22x

- 15mm = 37x

- 8mm = 70x

- 3.2mm = 175x

 

Lovely!  Waxing Crescent Moon @ 70x (PAR 8) almost filled the field; ultra-sharp, but with a hint of gold, and that blue-violet thin halo, reminders that this is a "fast" achromatic.  Like the C102, my GT-80 is a one-counter-weight scope on the Mizar SP mount.  A good thing when cloud-dodging -- and hauling the rig from the pool deck to the SE porch to the grassy knoll to the ~~

 

I'm glad that I made the move for Saturn, then Jupiter.  Wound up being some of the best air, and it was right at sunset.  Saturn @ 70x:  Titan, Rhea, & Tethys;  no background stars that early, so the effect was 3D; 2 grayish belts; crisp disk & rings.  At 175x:  3 Belts, and the 3 moons were pretty Airy Disks.  Jupiter @ 70x:  2 pairs of Galileans -- a pair on either side of the planet; setting GRS was dull pink-gray; and, 5 belts.  At 175x:  8 belts, and a sketch-worthy view!

 

I moved the rig to the north edge of the back yard, and while I waited on J&S to approach the meridian, I observed dozens of clusters and double stars in the TN5 (5" F5 triplet).  About 3 hours later...

 

Jupiter Views in 3 8's:

 

Three different 8mm eyepieces for 70x in the GT-80S:  Brandon, Paradigm, & Radian.  The Brandon had the least glare, best resolution, & "truest" belt colors.  The Paradigm had the brightest disk & Galileans, but this "washed-out" some of the finer details that I could see in the other 2; and, it was almost as glare-free as the Brandon.  The Radian had the most glare, but the best eye relief, and excellent resolution.

 

Good Grief!  I forgot the Best Part:  The GT-80S is short, the SP Tripod is tall, and Jupiter & Saturn are low in the sky; so, I was able to observe them straight-though, with no diagonal.  A better test & comparison between these different eyepieces.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 11 September 2021 - 08:48 AM.

  • Jacques, clamchip, PawPaw and 3 others like this

#7846 Kasmos

Kasmos

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,152
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2015
  • Loc: So Cal

Posted 11 September 2021 - 04:15 AM

Earlier at 11:15 p.m. was only the third time I was able to view Saturn and Jupiter this season. Mostly because, in the 38 years I've lived at this location, this year's been the cloudiest and most socked in by the Marine Layer ever. There's already a saying around here in normal years; May Gray followed by June Gloom. Last year it didn't clear much until mid July and this year all of August was gray. Also on the clear days I thought I might observe, the nights would cloud up. And on many cloudy days/evenings I was caught off gaurd when it completely cleared too late to set up and start.

 

The good news, it's been the coolest summer ever! and at the same time friends and relatives not too far away were burning up with 100° heat. Most days in August were in the low 70s and I believe we only hit 80° about three times.

 

Anyway, the Mizar SP-68R (68/1000mm) keeps reminding me why I love it. It's quick to set up and almost as easy to move around as a 60mm yet delivers more punch. The SP mount is also nice and easy to use and the way the tripod legs adjust inward it moves thru doorways easier than my 60s. Even though the conditions weren't great, at times Saturn looked very 3-D, showed some banding, shading, and Cassini. The contrast on Jupiter would pop, showing up to 6  cloud belts with mottled details. At first only 2 of it's moons were visible and then one slowly emerged from it's shadow. It was really interesting how long and far from the planet it was to completely brighten. The EPs I used were .965". A  9mm Unitron SYM. (111x), and a 12mm Celestron (DK) Ortho (83x).

 

I called it quits at 12:45 a.m.


Edited by Kasmos, 11 September 2021 - 04:20 AM.

  • Jacques, mdowns, Terra Nova and 6 others like this

#7847 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 890
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 11 September 2021 - 09:40 AM

The humidity was at 93% last night. It cleared up late and since the transparency was very good I decided to go out and do some visual observing. The Sears 6305 with the Unitron lens started the night on its original equatorial mount.Jupiter  was the first target but then I had to wait for some clouds that appeared out of nowhere to clear. I just took out a small table and used only 3 eyepieces, the 18mm Konig, 8mm Plossl and 6mm UO ortho. The 18mm Konig provided an ample view field with the well defined planet and 4 satellites. The 8mm Plossl showed some details and more belts. The contrast was very good. At 150x the 6mm UO ortho provided the best view of the planet's belts and zones. The GRS was just at the planet limb and exiting after a transit that I missed due to the earlier cloud cover. The equatorial zone was showing some differences in contrast. Saturn came next. It was small for the 18mm Konig but started to show the Cassini division with the 8mm Plossl. Better definition was obtained with the 6mm UO ortho. I was about a half hour into the observing session  when a cloud bank arrived. It had been raining on and off during the day so I was not very confident of these clouds and took everything inside. After 45 minutes the sky was clear again. I spent some more time on the planets and then decided to substitute the 6305 with the 60mm Carton f/17 and do the same observations. The Carton tube assembly fits perfectly on the 6305 mount.

 

Using the same eyepieces the Carton delivered excellent images of both planets. It would be difficult to say which telescope performed best. Both the Unitron and Carton lenses are of excellent quality. The Carton uses a 1.25" focuser instead of the .965" focuser of the 6305 Sears scope where I have to use an adapter. I continued with the Carton the rest of the night going over some of my favorite Messiers and doubles. The central area M31 was a bright blob in the 18mm Konig that reminded me of a big unresolved globular cluster. Gamma Andromeda was stunning with the 8mm Plossl delivering a great yellow-orange with blue contrast. The bigger Airy discs in these 60mm telescopes makes the contrast even more impressive. I saw Cassiopeia already out and high enough to serve as a starting point to find the double cluster. It was in the 6X30 Meade finder in no time. The 18mm Plossl showed the whole cluster in its field of view. A lot of bright stars could be observed but this area of the sky is one of the worst regarding light pollution. I was limited due to the ultra bright LED floodlights recently installed in a walkup just half a block from me. Next, I went quickly through Algol to find M34. The cluster showed a sparse group of stars. I guess that later at nigh as it climbed higher more stars would show. Gamma Arietis came next. The almost equal magnitude stars in this double suddenly reminded me of a VW bug coming at me during the night. For 30 years I only used VWs for transportation. They never disappointed. Finally I came upon 1 Arietis an easily resolved double star for this telescope. The best view of this one was with the 6mm UO ortho.  Clouds were already approaching from the east and it was late already. I gave Jupiter a last look to find Io sitting on the planet's limb and ready for an occultation. It would be followed later by Europa. (Love that Gas Giants App).

 

Well past midnight I collected everything as clouds overwhelmed the sky again. It was a nice observing run with the two telescopes on the vintage mount and hand driven all the time. I do have the original Sears clock drive for the mount but unfortunately I am missing the stud that threads into the mount base and holds the clock drive. The image shows only the Sears 6305 with Unitron objective looking at Jupiter. I know...the 6305 6X30 finder needs a refinish job.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Unitowa1.JPG

  • Jacques, mdowns, PawPaw and 7 others like this

#7848 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,237
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, LA (Lower Alabama)

Posted 11 September 2021 - 05:37 PM

More cloud-dodging on tap for tonight...

 

As of 2230Z (1730L):

84°F (29°C) / Humidity 59%

Wind Speed E 9 mph
Heat Index 87°F (31°C)

 

Since Clammy (my C102) got short-changed by my Meade 826 the other night, it's back on the Mizar SP; the Mizar Comet is on the AR-1 ShortPod; and, my Mizar GT-80S is on the Orion VersaGo 2...  Whew!!  3 very different Classics to tackle the waxing Crescent Moon, Saturn, Jupiter, and anything else I can nab in the gaps.

 

I had the 3 scopes as close together as possible, and each had its own chair.  Each had its own assignment, too:  C102 - Jupiter, Comet - Saturn, and GT-80 - Doubles & Clusters.  While I waited on J&S to approach the meridian, I turned the Comet to the Moon, and compared the .965" Mizar "bundle" eyepieces with my Swiss-made spectros set.  The latter are clearly higher quality, but the Mizars are very similar to the Vixens bundled with my Celestron scopes.  IOW:  Much better than the usual bundles.  For its part, using the spectros PL 7.5, the Comet showed Titan, Rhea, & Dione at 107x.

 

The 4" Comet is a better Moon Scope for me than my Meade 826, in which the surface is too bright, and subtler grays get overwhelmed.  At 160x (spectros PL5), the colors are as good as my 1984 Tak FC-50 at 80x (same eyepiece), and the sunlit limb is as sharp & bold.  Sketch-worthy, and I think a serious Lunatic would be happy with the performance -- especially from an ultra-light Newt Kit.

 

The Paradigms did well in the C102.  In some cloud gaps the seeing was 8+, and the 102 was sharp at 312x (PAR 3.2mm) or 78x per inch.  In transit, Io's disk was yellow-white, and its shadow was a jet black circle.  I was surprised by Clammy's contrast & resolution at 312x.  The disk appeared almost Quarter-sized.  The NEB was light brown & mottled, but winding within it was a rust-colored thin line that had occasional angular bulges.  No GRS, but a large oval protruded into the SSTZ.  I saw 4 Barges altogether, and while 3 were slender rectangles, one had a more ovoid shape.  Had to use averted vision to see any tails / trails within the EZ.  So...

 

If the weather cooperates, tonight I'll use either my 1970s Dakin 4" F10 or my 1988 Tak FC-100 F8, either of which out-performs my C102...


Edited by Bomber Bob, 12 September 2021 - 08:42 AM.

  • Jacques, steve t, PawPaw and 3 others like this

#7849 BKSo

BKSo

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 459
  • Joined: 08 Dec 2015

Posted 12 September 2021 - 07:59 AM

Since having the primary of my 2045 recoated in spring it has been cloudy. Talk about new dear curse crazy.gif Finally some dark sky time. Weather was good. NELM 6.0-6.5. The shape of M31 could be recognized, M33 also visible (assuming I did not mistaken a star for the galaxy). However dew was BAD.

 

M7             Visible naked eye just before setting.
M6             Again the 25mm Leica Periplan GF 10x/20 proves to be magical for clusters.
NGC6723 Used 25GF. Bright and easy.
M69          All smaller GC’s easy, bright and small with 25GF.
NGC6652
M70
NGC6624
M28         Very bright. Dense.
NGC6638
M4
M22         ! Partially resolved even with 25 GF.
NGC6642
M8           Quick look only.
M20         Used 25GF, 40 PL with and without UHC. Nebula in two portions. Hint of dark lane in the bigger southern part.
M17         Quick look only, with 40PL + UHC.
M16         Fainter than M17/M8, but bigger and brighter than M20. Trapezium shaped, more or less uniform brightness.
NGC7000 Used 64D + uhc. Quick look only.

Took a break, getting myself and the telescope warm, and returned near midnight.
NGC896  Faint. Some hint with 40PL without uhc. Confirmed with uhc. Somewhat easier with 64 D + uhc. Small, roughly round when seen with filter.
NGC247  Faint strip of light with 40PL. Transparency not good low in the sky.
NGC253  Best with 25GF. Very elongated. Bright. No more detail seen.
UGCA444? WLM Dwarf galaxy. Used 40PL. There seemed to be something at the reported location. Telescope dew over while observing.

 

Then I went to sleep. Looks like I need some dew removal solutions...


  • Jacques, steve t, Terra Nova and 4 others like this

#7850 Paul Sweeney

Paul Sweeney

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 640
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Heidelberg, Germany

Posted 12 September 2021 - 09:46 AM

Last night around 11PM I discovered that the sky had cleared up a bit after a day of sunshine and showers. Not trusting the clear weather to hold, I decided to go out with the Tasco 9T. The sky was stable but the sky was a little hazy.

Jupiter was first up, and I could make out some nice banding. The haze dimmed the image and made seeing details difficult. The moons made a nice line off to one side. It would have made a nice photo.

Saturn was up next. It was already sinking into the haze, but I could still make out a sharp disk and a dark shadow on the rings. Only one band was visible.

By this time the haze was forming into fog, which was all around me. So I moved to targets up higher in the sky. I split some doubles, checked out M 57, 27 and 15. M45 was just coming up, and it was nice at low power. Lastly, I went to the double cluster, but by now the fog was really coming down and I could hardly make it out. Around 2AM, with everything drenched in dew/fog, I decided to pack it in. About 15 minutes later the fog was as thick as peanut butter, and I was glad to be inside.
  • Jacques, steve t, mdowns and 6 others like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics