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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#7851 Piggyback

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 12:40 PM

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Clear skies this morning. Sun pretty active so out came my trusty Telemator with heated DayStar .7A ATM Hydrogen Alpha filter attached. Still fiddling with the setup but slowly getting there. Had some truly mesmerizing views. Prominences all over the limb with a faint one floating way up above the sun's surface.


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#7852 Terra Nova

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 01:37 PM

After several days of amazing weather, brilliant blue daytime skies, and lots of stars at night, things have changed. Skies were blue and temperatures perfect yesterday and a stiff breeze picked up in the afternoon. I had planned to possibly go to a dark sky site last night, but the turbulence was a deal breaker. I figured I would just stay home, watch Svengoolie and take out my 15x60 and 20x80 binoculars afterward. Shortly after 10pm, I walked out the backdoor and looked up to assess things. The transparency was downright awful. In the east, Jupe and Saturn glowed through the mirk, and when I looked overhead, I couldn’t make out much beyond the summer triangle. I had to strain looking northward to see Polaris. I shook my head and went back inside. Today, the skies aren’t any better- sort of a nasty, drab, brownish blue-gray. That stiff afternoon breeze yesterday ushered in a shift in the circulation aloft. We now are back into the thick of the sooty haze from the western fires. I don’t know if you are familiar with this webpage:

 

https://fire.airnow.gov
 

If you aren’t and you live in the lower 48, save the link. It’s a government website that tracks the fires and the associated smoke and haze. This is what today looks like:

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#7853 Bomber Bob

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 01:53 PM

While it was great last night having the Comet tracking Saturn & the C102 tracking Jupiter; and, they were close enough to each other that I could've "wheeled" back & forth in an office chair; it wasn't conducive to sketching...

 

IF I get to observe tonight, and the views justify sketching, I'll stick with one scope & planet at a time.


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#7854 Terra Nova

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 02:04 PM

While it was great last night having the Comet tracking Saturn & the C102 tracking Jupiter; and, they were close enough to each other that I could've "wheeled" back & forth in an office chair; it wasn't conducive to sketching...

 

IF I get to observe tonight, and the views justify sketching, I'll stick with one scope & planet at a time.

I really prefer devoting all my attention to a single scope, a single scope and a pair of binoculars, or a couple of pairs of binoculars. If sketching tho, one scope on a tracking mount and seated on a stool. When I drag out and set up more than one scope, it seems to become mostly about the equipment, and less about the subject at hand. I only do that when evaluating a newcomer.


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#7855 steve t

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 04:44 PM

In SW Ohio the hazy skies from the fires out west made only the brightest stars visible last night. I went out briefly around 10:30 PM.

 

While the seeing was not  the best, during moments of steady seeing Jupiter and Saturn presented excellent views in the 4" Newtonian at 125X.


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#7856 PawPaw

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 07:12 PM

I could smell smoke today, faint but there.  Yesterday I had to try the Solar Projector patented by Goto circa 1940's?  Maybe earlier.   It works as advertised  the old Goto Uranus.  In the future I  hope to project it into the garage setup as a darkroom and see how large I can project the image.  

 

Red skies in the morning sailor take warning

Red skies at night sailors delight.

 

 

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#7857 Bomber Bob

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 09:45 PM

BB Wins Beat The (Weather) Clock!

 

I planned on taking my Dakin 4" F10 out at 2130L...  then, I saw GOES, and the outskirts of TS Nicholas just due south of The Swamp... so, I had to bump that up by 2 hours...

 

At 2000L, Jupiter was in very clear very calm air (9/10 seeing) -- perfect object for continued testing of the A-T Paradigm ED eyepieces; and, in a Known Outstanding achromatic refractor (FL=1052mm):

 

15mm = 70x

8mm = 131x

3.2mm = 329x 

 

And... from 1930L to 2100L, Jupiter & the Galileans were Busy:

 

2021-09-12 19:37:13 -5: Europa begins transit
2021-09-12 20:30:13 -5: Io leaves eclipse
2021-09-12 20:38:13 -5: Europa's shadow appears

 

At 131x, the whitish disk of Europa chased after a RED GRS (the Dakin adds red to lots of things, but I appreciate that trait in this case!), and though tiny, stood out against the rust-brown strands of the SEB.  I had no idea Io was in eclipse... when a very faint "background star" grew brighter & larger & became a yellow-white Airy Disk -- Too Cool for School.  Few minutes later, a black moon shadow appears on the cloud tops, and starts chasing Europa's disk, which was chasing the GRS...  Wow!

 

Tough to stay focused [pun intended] on particular details with All That going on.  Okay... at 131x, I counted 9 belts, and saw yellowish-tans, rust, shades of brown, and light red-orange.  At 329x, I counted 13 belts; and, a tiny gray-pink "iris" inside the GRS that stood out from the very light reddish-orange interior.  (In sessions gone by, with Jupiter much higher in the sky, the Dakin has shown me mottling inside the GRS.)  The GRS Notch was like a thin brown-black fake eyebrow, with a yellow "cornea" between it & the GRS itself.  The effect was eerie --  an alien Cyclops staring at me across millions of miles...  

 

I did test the Paradigm eyepieces with my Brandons & Radians, but stuck with the PAR 3.2mm for most of the session.  The views were so good, I saw no need to back off the magnification.  And, I was racing against the weather clock:  By 2000L, I could see The Cloud Wall about 10* south of Jupiter, slowly oozing north.  It disturbed the air at mid-levels before any haze obscured the views.  I had to start "chasing focus" around 2050L, and started packing-up...

 

BIF:  In the Dakin, Jupiter's disk has a yellowish base color overall; but in the Paradigms, a couple of zones were pure white (in my Taks & reflectors, ALL of the zones are whites - some brighter than others).  And, I used the 1.25" Tak Prism Diagonal, rather than the 2" GSO dielectric diagonal, so that may have been a factor.  Compared with the Celestron (V) C102, the Dakin is the superior instrument, and I paid almost 3x more for it than the C102 -- and both were used.  But the Dakin is a hand-crafted refractor with (most likely) a USA-made objective.  And, it has a cleaner DPAC pattern.  But if I'd never used the Dakin, I'd be happy as a hog in slop with the Celestron.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 12 September 2021 - 10:01 PM.

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#7858 oldmanastro

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 10:27 PM

 

BIF:  In the Dakin, Jupiter's disk has a yellowish base color overall; but in the Paradigms, a couple of zones were pure white (in my Taks & reflectors, ALL of the zones are whites - some brighter than others).  And, I used the 1.25" Tak Prism Diagonal, rather than the 2" GSO dielectric diagonal, so that may have been a factor.  Compared with the Celestron (V) C102, the Dakin is the superior instrument, and I paid almost 3x more for it than the C102 -- and both were used.  But the Dakin is a hand-crafted refractor with (most likely) a USA-made objective.  And, it has a cleaner DPAC pattern.  But if I'd never used the Dakin, I'd be happy as a hog in slop with the Celestron.

Nice report! I have to check on colors observed with different eyepieces, never paid much attention to this but it seems quite interesting. It will be even more interesting with my mostly "no frills" eclectic eyepiece collection. 

 

Another 90%+ humidity night with a soup in the upper atmosphere. The dust is gone but things don't improve much. The only thing I saw early on was the waxing moon approaching first quarter with my old Sears Scope Branded 7-15X zoom binoculars. Much earlier I was watching two nice looking macaws perched on a royal palm.


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#7859 highfnum

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 10:35 PM

9/11 transit with RV6

Capture 2021-09-11T23_26_26rv6bpE.jpg


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#7860 oldmanastro

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Posted 13 September 2021 - 10:00 AM

I could smell smoke today, faint but there.  Yesterday I had to try the Solar Projector patented by Goto circa 1940's?  Maybe earlier.   It works as advertised  the old Goto Uranus.  In the future I  hope to project it into the garage setup as a darkroom and see how large I can project the image.  

 

Red skies in the morning sailor take warning

Red skies at night sailors delight.

Wonderful Goto telescope. I like that vintage altazimuth mount with the long slow motion control bar. Looks like a 76mm.


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#7861 Esso2112

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Posted 13 September 2021 - 10:11 AM

Haven’t been able to observe in a while.  Too hot, cloudy, or having to work the next day.  The last two nights I have been able to go out and just observe naked eye.  We’re currently on vacation, hanging out at 10,000 ft in the mountains of Colorado.  The Milky Way has been stunning, stretching from horizon to horizon.  The next couple of days look a bit rainy, so no plans to observe.  From Wednesday on looks clear, though.  I have my AP 130 and classic Tak FC-76 with me and they will get set up then.  We’ll be here for a a couple of weeks, so plenty of time to finally get out under the stars.  


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#7862 PawPaw

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Posted 13 September 2021 - 01:58 PM

Wonderful Goto telescope. I like that vintage altazimuth mount with the long slow motion control bar. Looks like a 76mm.

Thanks Guido.....This is the type 4 Uranus 58mm F 13.7 circa 1945 - 1952.  Here is a nice write up on a Uranus model from Japan.

https://blog.goo.ne....7ffd1fff4dc2d9f

 

I did some further research on the solar projector and found it was invented by Seizo Goto while he was still employed at Nikon.  He also patented the solar projector but I cannot find the patent document.   Goto left Nikon in 1926 and started Goto optical.  Here is a series of writeups on the solar projector.  Look at articles 1 - 5.

 

https://www.domenavi.../2020/30_2.html

 

Don


Edited by PawPaw, 13 September 2021 - 07:13 PM.

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#7863 oldmanastro

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 08:40 AM

Thanks Guido.....This is the type 4 Uranus 58mm F 13.7 circa 1945 - 1952.  Here is a nice write up on a Uranus model from Japan.

https://blog.goo.ne....7ffd1fff4dc2d9f

 

I did some further research on the solar projector and found it was invented by Seizo Goto while he was still employed at Nikon.  He also patented the solar projector but I cannot find the patent document.   Goto left Nikon in 1926 and started Goto optical.  Here is a series of writeups on the solar projector.  Look at articles 1 - 5.

 

https://www.domenavi.../2020/30_2.html

 

Don

Thanks Don. I had never seen a solar projector like that one. It's a lot like the camera lucida that was used in microscopes for specimen drawing. The brightness of the solar image will probably allow a nice big sun to be projected on a dark room. The telescope looks bigger in the image.  I kept the links for future reference.


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#7864 oldmanastro

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 09:37 AM

It was clearing up yesterday as the sun set but I waited until 8:45pm to go out just to make sure. The sky was completely clear and transparency was the best that I had seen in a while. The night seemed alright to give the 100mm f/13 Carton a chance. In about 10 minutes I had the Carton mounted on the Astroview. The Carton is about the limit for this mount. The humidity was 98% so I knew that dew would be a big problem. I had jupiter on the FOV of the 18mm Konig in no time. The seeing was excellent. Even at this low power I could see several belts on the planet. I went up to the 8mm Plossl and the belts became more numerous with some details in the equatorial regions. The 6mm UO ortho (216x) provided a great view of the planet with details visible on the NEB and SEB regions. Even the 4mm UO ortho (325x) showed a nice crisp image. No loss of detail was visible. It was my best view of Jupiter ever with this telescope. The CA is so well controlled that I could not see any hint of violet around the planet. Saturn was next. Again the 6 and 4mm orthos provided the best views. Titan and Rhea were visible and the planet was clearly showing the Cassini division and a couple of Belts. The image remained crisp even at 325x. While observing I had noticed some lighting flashes on the north horizon but with no clouds anywhere, I paid no attention but I should have. Looking east I saw clouds gathering and in no time the sky was overcast. I don't trust any cloud at this time of the year so after just 50 minutes of observing time, I collected everything inside.

 

While placing the telescope in the storage space I checked the objective lens and to my surprise found a line of fungus on the outside border of the crown element. I cleaned it out. The rest of the objective was clean. Now two new packets of silica gel are taped to the inside of the lens cap that goes over the dew shield. I keep a supply of new silica gel packs around.

 

At about 10:30pm I was finished with the telescope and decided to take a look outside. It was clearing up mad.gif laugh.gif . Not being sure of what would happen later I took out my almost 56 years old Sears 60mm f/11 with the two original 15mm H and 4mm R eyepieces plus a 22mm Kellner, 9mm HM and 6mm HM on loan from the 2535 Sears. The last of the clouds cleared out and I enjoyed some nice views of Jupiter and Saturn with my old friend. I was surprised by the amount of belts that the 6mm HM brought out. The image was crisp and clear. Saturn was showing Titan and the 6mm HM showed the belt region and the Cassini division at the ansae. I used the 15mm H original eyepiece on Saturn just to see how I looked at it the first time with my then much younger eyes. The thrill of that early morning observation in 1966 has never been forgotten. After the planets I went to some doubles. Gamma Arietis was excellent and best with the 9mm HM. Gamma Andromeda was stunning, as usual, with both the 9mm HM and 6mm HM. In both eyepieces the strong yellow-orange color of the primary and blue secondary came through. I veered west to Albireo, a great view on the 9mm HM. The colors here are similar to those of Gamma Andromeda but more subdued. A bit south I found M2 to the south in Aquarius just a few degrees from my zenith. It was a bright fuzzy blob on the 22mm Kellner. I tried M31without success. The area of the sky was still submerged in a very light polluted region. Later on as it climbed out of there it would be visible.

 

At 11:30pm the sky started to cloud up again. Dew was already over the objective lens and in fact all over the telescope. I took the whole telescope and tripod on one hand and the stool in the other and was inside in 30 seconds. The telescope, tripod and tray had to be dried with a microfiber towel. I allowed the objective to dry out by itself. The little telescope and I had a nice short observing session again. I forgot to take an image of the little one but I had taken one of the 100mm Carton looking at Saturn. You can see the humidity over the tube.

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#7865 PawPaw

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 09:46 AM

Another wonderful report Guido!  No longer will I complain about 83% humidity.  98%.......Isn't that 2% away from raining?

 

Cheers

 

Don


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#7866 steve t

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 11:00 AM

On the Sun this morning, it looks like the last of the latest solar spot outbreak was about to rotate out of view. There was no sign, on the opposite edge of anything new coming around.


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#7867 Terra Nova

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 03:01 PM

On the Sun this morning, it looks like the last of the latest solar spot outbreak was about to rotate out of view. There was no sign, on the opposite edge of anything new coming around.

[SAD] button

 

click!


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#7868 oldmanastro

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 09:50 PM

Another wonderful report Guido!  No longer will I complain about 83% humidity.  98%.......Isn't that 2% away from raining?

 

Cheers

 

Don

 

 

Thanks Don! These days the humidity has not come down from 90% at night and its above 80% during the day. I was surprised to see the 98% on my outdoor humidity meter last night and in fact, during the interval between the two telescopes it rained a bit. Last night everything was wet after 30 minutes outside. It had rained heavily all afternoon. The ground was hot so I guess that a lot of evaporation caused the humidity to go that high. I was surprised that after 45 minutes the 100mm Carton lenses had no dew on them. It must be the long dew shield. The image shows the situation today. Not even in our drier months of winter have I seen the humidity here drop below 60%. 

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#7869 ccwemyss

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 10:35 PM

Monday night I was testing the 1992 vintage Meade 152ED that I just bought locally from another CN'er. This is my first Meade (I've been biased since I worked at the scope shop in the 80's -- we didn't carry them because the owner was miffed at Meade throwing their dealers under the bus by selling direct from Crown Optics). But the seller is very experienced, and vouched for the quality of the optics. One article I read also said that Diebel tried to improve quality control, after he bought Meade back in 1990, to restore its reputation. There is a signed QC sticker inside the lens cover. 

 

It was a 1st quarter moon, and there were high, thin clouds that came and went, so it wasn't the best of conditions. The atmosphere was unstable near the horizon. Venus clearly showed its shape, in a watery sort of way, and atmospheric dispersion gave it some extra color, top and bottom, but no sigh of CA. 

 

Overall, the scope is very good. A star test shows some undercorrection, with the rings sharper inside of focus than outside. As I would expect, it has less contrast than my 6"f9 AP triplet. Using a 10mm Delite, for 170X, The colors on Jupiter were not as saturated. I could make out 6 belts and some detail in the NEB. Saturn showed one belt, and Cassini was easy to spot, but the fainter moons were a little harder to pick up with averted vision.

 

Looking at a few prominent doubles, Izar, Rasalgethi, and Almach separated nicely, although the colors shifted significantly with slight defocusing. Rasalgethi's primary looked bright orange until it was focused. Alberio was lovely.

 

On the moon, there was just a tiny bit of faint yellow at the limb, at 285X, but no purple at all - I wouldn't notice the yellow if I wasn't looking carefully for it. The fine detail was close to what the AP shows. A couple of cell phone snaps through the Nagler 4.8mm:

 

Meade APO - 1.jpeg

 

Meade APO - 2.jpeg

 

M57 wasn't quite as contrasty with the 10mm Delite  as in the AP, and I couldn't glimpse the outer companion star with averted vision, as I can in the AP (although that only became possible with the recent baffle improvements). With M31, 32, and 110, in the 41 Pan, it took some effort to see 110, while it's obvious in the AP. M13 resolved nicely, maybe needing a bit more averted vision to get to the core than in the AP. The double cluster was very sharp.

 

I could probably improve the contrast by repainting its interior with Black 2.0, but I'm not going to touch the lens cell and risk decentering the elements. I understand that the baffles are just held by friction, so if I could pull them out the back and repaint them, that might improve things, but I'm not sure how the rear cell is held in place. I see one screw near the bottom, and there are the finder bracket screws, but I also know that Meade liked to glue things.

 

It has the electronic focuser, with a JMI controller. I'm not a fan of electronic focusers, and it has some lag in reversing. With the motor, turning the focuser knob manually is quite stiff. Either I'll adapt to the electronics, or I may tinker with it. I did replace the 8x50 finder (which is stopped down behind the objective to about 40mm) with a Telrad on a Meade finder shoe, and that worked nicely. 

My AP 706 mount carried it well, but the pedestal I just finished building needs additional bracing for this much weight, which I suspected it would - there was a lot of low frequency vibration that took forever to damp.

 

It's definitely much better than one of the 6" f8 achromats (comparable to my early f16 Unitron 142, in terms of CA). Although it doesn't match a fine triplet, it's still going to give excellent views for my students that will make it much easier for them to see the features I want them to experience.

 

Chip W. 


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#7870 clamchip

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 10:46 AM

I was observing the ring nebula M57 and was disappointed in how dark it was.

Thinking it was the large secondary obstruction in my C8, I just happened to have

a 8 inch f/6 newt handy and it looked identical.

I guess it must be my eye sight, oh well, I've always wanted to fool around with

radio astronomy.

I should measure my eyeball aperture and see how far open my iris opens.

I remember reading somewhere its easy to do this measurement with allen

wrenches.

Otherwise its been extremely interesting watching Saturn's moons almost every

night.

Robert 

Here it is. It is in the book 'Astronomy Hacks' I gave it to my brother in-law but

it's explained here on cloudy nights:

 https://www.cloudyni...easurement-how/


Edited by clamchip, 15 September 2021 - 10:55 AM.

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#7871 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 11:00 AM

If you had the magnification really cranked up Robert, it may have been the small exit pupil. I prefer a smaller image and a bigger, brighter exit pupil myself anymore. I seldom ever go below .5mm and really prefer closer to 1mm. I have really become a fan of lower magnification observing in the past couple of years. I’ve been amazed at how much one really can see at a lower exit pupil. Those extra photons really help!


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#7872 clamchip

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 11:16 AM

Here is the actual Hack #7 explaining how to measure your entrance pupil.

Top of page 25:

https://books.google...renches&f=false

 

Robert


Edited by clamchip, 15 September 2021 - 11:19 AM.

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#7873 DAVIDG

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 11:37 AM

 The other thing to consider is that the Ring  emits a far amount in the blue end of  the spectra. As we age the lens in our eyes starts to yellow which filters out blue light. Ask anyone who has had cataract surgery and  they will tell you how blue the sky now is with their new clear lens.  Walter Scott Houston in an old DeepSky Wonders article wrote about observing the Ring after he had his cataracts removed.

   I keep checking my eyes by seeing if I can still see a "black light". I also check them  by viewing the Sun with  a CaK filter which I can still  see a fairly bright image of. Hopefully this isn't your problem but just poor sky conditions.

 

                     - Dave 


Edited by DAVIDG, 15 September 2021 - 04:13 PM.

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#7874 Bomber Bob

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 11:40 AM

TS Nicholas started dumping on The Swamp on 9/13, and looks like my scopes will be idle until the 20th, at least...  and, just as I was getting back in something resembling a rotation schedule!

 

So as my schedule permits, I'm cleaning eyepieces, lenses, mirrors, etc.  And, going back through my AVI Archives of planetary videos shot on better nights -- Auld Lang Syne in September!


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#7875 highfnum

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 02:30 PM

edmund 4 inch - quark 

busy corner on sun

Capture 2021-09-15T14_24_15ed4f.jpg


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