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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#7926 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 26 September 2021 - 02:12 PM

Terra

thanks that gave me an idea    I dug out my home made silver polymer and PVC pipe solar filter I made for the T V Oracle for the great American solar eclipse in August of 2017.     On all my 3 inch scopes it fit only on the Oracle  and the Unitron 140

Today I tried it on the little Pentax7x  and  it works.....

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Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 26 September 2021 - 03:26 PM.

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#7927 ccwemyss

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 08:23 AM

Last night I was able to spend some time comparing the Meade 152ED to the AP 6"f9 on deep sky. I thought that on low power, deep sky, the difference would be reduced, but it is still there. This was using the same eyepieces and diagonal, to keep the differences to just what's coming through the OTA. It will sound like more than it actually is, as I describe it - each difference required minutes of scrutiny, with repeated back-and-forth between the scopes to confirm, and on objects I'm very familiar with. Casual observing (as my students will do with the Meade) would lead you to think they are the same. 

 

On M81/M82/NGC3077 with a 41mm, there was no discernible difference. The brighter galaxies both showed similar detail, and 3077 was the same faint smudge with averted vision. On M31/M32/M110, M31's core had a more stellar-like appearance in the AP, and it was easier to trace across the field. M110 was more noticeable in the AP. But the dark lane in M31 was equally visible in both. With M13, using a 14mm, both resolved to the core, but the Meade needed more careful use of averted vision to get there. M57 looked basically the same, but the faint companion star, just outside the ring, was easier to spot in the AP. It was there in the Meade, but it took more careful control of my gaze to see it. The double cluster, again with the 41mm, showed more of the faint asterisms than the other night with the full moon. It didn't have quite the sparkle that it does in the AP. 

 

Overall, the AP was easier to bring to best focus, while the Meade needed careful back and forth with the electric focuser. Manual focusing on the Meade is rough, owing to the coupling to the motor. I'm tempted to take the motor off, and see if it's smooth enough without it to just focus manually.

 

Bottom line is that the undercorrection in the Meade does result in slightly less sharpness and contrast. And the ED doublet has a hair more CA than the AP triplet. But for far lower cost, it's at least 90% of the benefit. As an outreach scope, it's perfect. And it's a great option for someone who wants a 6" refractor that's a big improvement over an achromat, without spending at top tier levels.  

 

Chip W. 


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#7928 clamchip

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 01:58 PM

Love it......one  wonders if you could improve on it a bit...?  Save all the original parts    and save the original tube up in the rafters of the garage/shed etc. Make a better tube  better cell  better secondary  and install an actual  focuser     

 

  but I just love the wheel pully and fan belt look. How is the functionality of that wheel and fan belt thing?  It exudes  cool     just saying

All the belts and pullies are for moving the telescope in altitude. You can see the steering wheel I marked

with a arrow. Azimuth motion is from the same steering wheel only you don't turn the wheel you just push

or pull. This is not on the Dobson plans, it's something the builder added. 

The guy I bought the scope from said his dad built it when he was about 4 yrs old and he looks like he is

in his mid-late 20's now. 

The controls remind me of the Nasmyth telescope.

Robert

 

IMG_0459.jpg

nasmyth.jpg


Edited by clamchip, 27 September 2021 - 02:03 PM.

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#7929 shredder1656

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 02:31 PM


The guy I bought the scope from said his dad built it when he was about 4 yrs old and he looks like he is
in his mid-late 20's now.

nasmyth.jpg


It's an impressive build, but even more impressive by a 4 year old. WOW!
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#7930 clamchip

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 02:44 PM

I guess I did word it like that didn't I !

 

I forgot to say I'm glad I have Jupiter so handy for testing telescopes.

This funky Dobson Dobsonian has a great mirror and the 3 vane cedar shingle

spider produces a pleasing 6 faint diffraction spikes around stars.

Really all it needs to be a fine telescope for observing is a focuser.

 

Robert


Edited by clamchip, 27 September 2021 - 02:53 PM.

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#7931 shredder1656

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 04:07 PM

I guess I did word it like that didn't I !

 

I forgot to say I'm glad I have Jupiter so handy for testing telescopes.

This funky Dobson Dobsonian has a great mirror and the 3 vane cedar shingle

spider produces a pleasing 6 faint diffraction spikes around stars.

Really all it needs to be a fine telescope for observing is a focuser.

 

Robert

Sorry.  Couldn't help myself. lol.gif  My kids hate my "dad jokes". 


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#7932 bjkaras

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 09:26 PM

I just picked up a 6” f/8 Cave, so I finally assembled it today. I’ll take it for a test drive tomorrow night.


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#7933 Bomber Bob

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Posted 28 September 2021 - 07:25 AM

Only 2 scopes last night...  My 1988 Tak FC-100 and my 1980s Mizar GT-80S.  I knew before I went out that the air was turbulent, and overall about 8/10 seeing (better for deep-sky than planetary).

 

Tak did very well on the 2 giants.  Saturn -- Titan + 3, and sharp views at 320x to 400x.  Ditto for Jupiter.  No GRS, but I got to watch both Io's disk & shadow glide over the cloud tops.  The Shadow was black & obvious at just 53x (AT Para 15mm), and stayed that way as I zoomed up.  The off-white disk was best at 266x (Brandon 6 + Tak Barlow).  No Doubt, the Brandons are my sharpest planetary eyepieces.

 

***** BIF:  I noticed the field edges in the AT Paradigm eyepieces are very sharp -- virtually zero distortion to Saturn or Jupiter from 53x to 250x.  *****

 

GT-80 covered the entire Milky Way from south to north.  At the zenith, I had to move my chair to the other side of the VersaGo, and managed to bump the tripod... No damage, but I said a few unkind words.  35x with an ancient Jaegers 16mm Erfle.  Sharp.  Bright.  Large Field.  IF we get some clear skies this winter, I will be taking the scope Up the Country...

 

[Cue Canned Heat here]

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=Hf0Dm-OaTNk


Edited by Bomber Bob, 28 September 2021 - 05:19 PM.

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#7934 highfnum

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 03:09 PM

sun edmund3 f15 and quark combo Ha

Capture 2021-09-29T13_58_51ed3e.jpg


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#7935 highfnum

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 05:55 AM

"The controls remind me of the Nasmyth telescope."

yes it does 

but

do you have same outfit to wear?


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#7936 Bomber Bob

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 05:10 PM

Honestly, after 5 nights of good to near-perfect seeing in a row, I really shouldn't complain about having to play Beat The Clock last night but...  This is The South -- we enjoy griping about the weather.

 

I had the ultra-light C80P + SP at the SE Corner before sunset -- and I could already see spiral arms approaching from the SW.  Meanwhile, I sat the GT-80S + VG2 on the Bermuda Rectangle outside the shed.

 

I ignored Saturn [yeah, I typed that], and went right for cloud-threatened Jupiter.  No GRS, but with the Tak Prism, I got some great views of the cloud belts at 180x in the nose-dive seeing -- all shades of gray, but that's okay...

 

Literally dashed up the yard, plopped that rig beside the GT-80, and nabbed doubles from Lyra to Lacerta while the gettin' was good...

 

These are 2 x Outstanding 80mm Achromatics -- Mizar & Vixen -- and very different -- F7 vs. F11.  GT split the Double-Double @ 70x (BR / AT 8mm), took ~ 76x in the C80 (OR 12), but it was cleaner.  All 4 stars were whitish in both fracs.  BUT... with Beta Lyrae, while the C80 shows brighter blue-white & fainter / white stars, the GT shows a bright white with a hint of gold + a much fainter white star.  I tried swapping Prisms & Eyepieces -- Tak + BR 8 w/ Baader + AT 8 -- made no observable difference.  No Clouds or Haze...  Very Strange.  I've observed the pair in the GT before, and don't recall this view --> But, I may have been using the GSO 2" dielectric...

 

I also just had to get a quick peek at The Coathanger, Dumbbell, Delphinus Doubles, M29, M39, M15, M2, etc. before I lost them...  Except for Cygnus, these were, Yep!  That's It! stop & goes.  Sense Of Urgency?  You bet.  The Swamp will be all Cloudy Nights until maybe THURS next week...


Edited by Bomber Bob, 30 September 2021 - 05:11 PM.

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#7937 steve t

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Posted 01 October 2021 - 07:35 AM

I've been watching a pair of very active sunspot groups pass across the sun. At night, Saturn and Jupiter have been the main targets.

 

I've also been comparing my old Zeiss Jena 6mm Orthoscopic to my Brandon 6mm on Jupiter an Saturn in my 4" F/10 Newtonian. Due to floaters I normally don't use eyepieces that produce an exit pupil of <1m, but have been surprised at how few floaters are visible in either of the eyepieces.  The biggest challenge with these eyepieces are the narrow field of views that make tracking a challenge.

 

On a side note: I used the Zeiss Jena 6mm to observe the SL-9 comet impact on Jupiter back in the 1990's in an 8" F/6 scope, very memorable timegramps.gif lol.gif


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#7938 highfnum

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Posted 01 October 2021 - 01:48 PM

edmund4 quark sunspot group

Capture 2021-10-01T12_17_39ed4.jpg


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#7939 Bomber Bob

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Posted 01 October 2021 - 03:51 PM

[Big Sigh]  Too bad it's 2030Z, and not 2030L:

 

GOES - 20211001Z2030.jpg

 

We'd have 7/10 or better skies at The Swamp.  Oh.  Well.  I still have my 2 x Great 80s in the shed.  IF I move Clammy out there, those NW-SE slivers will move in by sunset; if I do nothing, they'll stay away...  Superstitious?  Naw!!

 

I wound up with 3 Fracs side-by-side:  C80P, GT-80S, & Jaegers 50.  ALL 3 pointed at Saturn, then Jupiter.  ALL 3 limited to about 60x / inch by the eroding seeing.  The 2 x 80's were very similar at 180x.  I liked Saturn's colors better in the C80P.  The GRS Notch was prominent in all 3.  The J50 F12 at 120x was Tak Sharp on both Giants.  After the planets, I spent the remainder of the short session with the Jaegers, splitting doubles mostly -- and enjoying that high-quality Dinky 18mm Asahi Finder.  Yes... it was worth buying that plastic Carton to get this accessory.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 02 October 2021 - 12:52 PM.

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#7940 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 07:14 AM

Had someone set up the EM10 mount on the bigger EM200 tripod with solid legs.  Asking  for     help which I am not known for  was well   helpful.  I've been thinking that I am missing out on planet season with this unfortunate lumbar fracture 

So  I had help mounting the big FS 128  and covered it all up with a well made  and large  dob cover to wait for   darkness on the edge of town....

 

When Saturn finally popped out of the neighbor's trees into the window of opportunity we were ready.  The big 5 inch refractor did not disappoint  the image was wonderful    but I had trouble with the mount. It lit up fine  and I could barely hear it operating but the control did not do anything. No slewing no movement .  Frustrating,  and yes I know it is in its third decade , but using the mount manually took the wind out of my sails  and I did not even wait for Jupiter     I carefully put away the big bulky tube and eyepiece's      The big scope was pushing it for me anyway  

 

Guess   we will stick with the 3 inch and maybe the lighter 4 inch refractors on the easy peasy    Unistar alt az ..................


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#7941 ccwemyss

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 12:05 PM

Glad you're getting help, Barry. Sorry you weren't able to see Jupiter. There was a nice pass of the GRS last night.

 

Seeing here was mediocre, with a lot of moisture in the air. Not especially unsteady, but I couldn't push the 6"f9 or the C14 past about 150X. I didn't bother with the Meade. The last few times I've had it out, it has gotten dripping wet in about an hour, which is only about 30 minutes after cool down.

 

The nice things about the observatory scopes are, no lifting, no aligning, and with the reflectix, no cool down. Also, no wind vibration, stray light, or dewing. And shut-down, when I'm tired, is just putting on caps, closing the slit, and turning off the power. 

 

I was able to see about 7 belts on Jupiter, and some detail in the NEB and around the GRS. The main difference between the two was that the extra brightness of the C14 showed more color in the spot. Used UO Koenig 8mm in the AP and 24mm in the Celestron. Moving on to Saturn, Cassini was nice and crisp in the refractor, and I could see Titan, Rhea, Tethys and Dione in both. The C14 picked up Mimas, but wasn't as sharp on the planet.

 

Thin clouds were moving in, so I took some quick glances at a few favorite deep sky objects. For the first time, from our light polluted location, I was able to make out spiral structure in M33 with the C14, using the 41mm. I could see both the arm that connects to NGC604, and the one on the other side, and the core showed elongation between the two. Normally the view is just a smudge where the core is, and the knot of 604. 

 

Chip W.


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#7942 barbie

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 03:29 PM

Friday night I observed Jupiter and Saturn as well as a couple of doubles in Lyra and Cygnus with my 1996 Meade ETX90. Images were superbly sharp and all doubles cleanly split.


Edited by barbie, 02 October 2021 - 03:30 PM.

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#7943 oldmanastro

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 06:01 PM

Friday night I observed Jupiter and Saturn as well as a couple of doubles in Lyra and Cygnus with my 1996 Meade ETX90. Images were superbly sharp and all doubles cleanly split.

This is why, in this aperture range, the ETX90 is my favorite scope after the Questar. It never lets you down and images are tack sharp. When I have taken the ETX90 for group observing, people are skeptic at first but when they see the Moon, Saturn or Jupiter through the telescope comments like wonderful, oh my God, and "this made my evening", are common. The mount... well... we have to live with it but it works pretty well for visual astronomy.


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#7944 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 06:29 PM

This is why, in this aperture range, the ETX90 is my favorite scope after the Questar. It never lets you down and images are tack sharp. When I have taken the ETX90 for group observing, people are skeptic at first but when they see the Moon, Saturn or Jupiter through the telescope comments like wonderful, oh my God, and "this made my evening", are common. The mount... well... we have to live with it but it works pretty well for visual astronomy.

Nice reports Barbie and Guido re the Meade ETX 90.....Have to keep it in mind. So  one wonders what the ETX 125 would be like?



#7945 barbie

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 09:31 PM

I had an ETX125 years back and it too was fantastic optically. After observing with my ETX90, I no longer feel the need to upgrade to a Questar, Takahashi or any more high end optics because I simply don't get enough clear nights here in Ohio to justify the cash outlay. After having the high end scopes, I now know that I'm not missing anything based on the performance of my ETX90 and what it has shown me since obtaining it!!


Edited by barbie, 02 October 2021 - 09:40 PM.

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#7946 oldmanastro

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 10:32 PM

I observed through an ETX125 only once almost 20 years ago. At that time I was teaching a small group of new ETX telescopes owners about how to use the Autostar 497 system. They all bought them at the local Discovery Store. The PR Astronomical Society asked me to help this group that had approached them for guidance. One of them brought his ETX125 which I used as an example. The views were just as good as the ETX90. Unfortunately many of those ETXs are now sitting in damp closets. At this time all of the ETXs were made in the US.


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#7947 bjkaras

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 11:14 PM

I tried out my 6” Cave for the first time the other night and the only thing I could see well from my Bortle 8-9 driveway was Jupiter. The image was great but it started breaking down a little around 250x, but it was a hot day and the seeing wasn’t as good as I’d like. I can’t wait to get it to one of my dark sites! I’ll set it up next to my 10” so I can do a real comparison.


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#7948 Bonco2

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Posted 03 October 2021 - 03:58 PM

After setting up several nights in a row only to have clouds move in, finally last night I got a chance to view Jupiter with the Unitron 142. Saturn unfortunately was already behind the trees. Ahh but a nice steady sky and my best views  were with my 7mm RG Meade @ 171X. Very sharp showing 6 bands and shading of gray on both poles.  Put in a blue filter which made the equitorial bands really stand out. As soon as I get another good night I'll try the ETX 90 for a comparison. My guess is the views will be similar.  Other notes:  I have an electric drive for the Unitron, but I never use it. The slow motion controls are so smooth and easy to use I don't bother using the electric drive. Also the tripod is so sturdy that I don't spread the legs to the normal position. Instead I have the legs closer together which puts the telescope in a higher position. This puts the eyepiece in a more comfortable position. 

Bill


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#7949 sdedalus83

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Posted 03 October 2021 - 09:55 PM

I got half an hour with the Edmund 6001 instead of last night’s 5 minutes. I started out using a recent production Celestron prism diagonal and experienced considerably more CA than with my Baader. Defocused, Jupiter looked like an orange donut with a greenish white center and Saturn had a lot of purple fringe. It also introduced obvious miscollimation. Switching back to the Baader cleaned things up - no noticeable CA on Saturn. Jupiter still had a noticeable purple fringe that ebbed and flowed with seeing, though the defocused image had none of the bizarre coloration. When it did settle, I got a nice view of the GRS, nice texture in the SEB, and six bands. When the seeing was stable and I was at good focus, the fringe was almost unnoticeable. I couldn’t see it at all on Saturn - the Cassini division, two bands on the planet, and the planet’s shadow on the rings were all very sharp. I must have been seeing things last night, because I could only split Epsilon 1 tonight. 2 was clearly elongated at 125x but more of a smear than two overlapping balls. 
 

Stars look a lot like they do in my Bushnell Sky Rover, just like the textbook drawings. It’s a major step up from my DK 60mm f7 and better than my Space Scope 151x, though that has a minor spacing or wedge issue. I’d like to get a chance to compare it to a classic FC 60 someday.


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#7950 Star.Monger

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Posted 05 October 2021 - 06:42 AM

Stars look a lot like they do in my Bushnell Sky Rover, just like the textbook drawings. It’s a major step up from my DK 60mm f7 and better than my Space Scope 151x, though that has a minor spacing or wedge issue. I’d like to get a chance to compare it to a classic FC 60 someday.

Its the poor man's FC 60!  I have compared several Edmunds 63 f/8 objectives (NOS) to my FC 60.  Low power views are identical. Slight edge to the Tak above 100x as there's no color.  My Edmunds has a small Crayford and mounted on a UA Unistar Light or old Polaris.  It's the most used scope in my collection.  

 

 

IMG_0347.JPG

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