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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#7976 Augustus

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Posted 12 October 2021 - 09:10 PM

Got the 8" Dobson out again (I haven't even posted all the times I take it out) for sidewalk astronomy in downtown Stamford. I have to carry it 4 blocks each way because I use my parking pass at UConn which is far from the intersection I set up, which is my substitute for going to the gym. Tonight I had the Moon and both Jupiter and Saturn visible between city hall and another tall building which was nice. As usual ~100 people got to look through it, and I met a plasma physicist who now wants to buy a scope and do sidewalk astronomy himself, which is pretty great. 

 

I also tried out the 63mm Busch on the Moon which was pretty good. Need to fix that center column thingy.


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#7977 icomet

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Posted 12 October 2021 - 10:23 PM

Nothing. Too much light pollution.  grin.gif 

 

Clear Skies.  

 

Red lights are wind turbines.

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Edited by icomet, 13 October 2021 - 07:28 AM.

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#7978 Terra Nova

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Posted 13 October 2021 - 10:14 AM

Jupiter and Saturn were fabulous last night in my twenty year old 102mm Vixen apo refractor. It was quite exciting watching Jupiter’s tiny moon Io slowly disappear behind the limb of the massive Gas Giant! The telescope performed wonderfully! I set it up just as it was getting dark on the concrete walk in front of my garden shed where I have a perfect view of the eastern ecliptic. The air was still and getting cool as the evening came on. All of the earlier clouds had disappeared. Setup literally took less than three minutes. I had my big alt-az mount set up on its tripod near the french doors of my walkout basement. It was just a matter of opening the doors, grabbing the stiffened tripod by its legs just below the hub and carrying it out the door. Then I brought out the tele and slip its mounting rail into the jaws of the ADM saddle and locked it down. Then I went back in and grabbed my TeleVue eyepiece case and I was ready to rumble. Talk about grab and go… It was more like grab and gone. I sighted Jupiter in with my 19mm Panoptic. I could tell that the air was wonderfully stable. Conditions were perfect! Jupiter was bright and stark with no hint of false color on or around the orb at 34X. I could easily see bands even at this low power. The four Galilean moons were there and a smattering of stars were visible as well in the darkening sky. I put in the 13mm T6 Nagler (50X) and again, the stark whiteness of the orb with the subtle brown NEB and SEB were there and darker blue-grey temperate bands faintly appeared as thin parallel streaks. I cycled up to the 9mm T6. (72X). More detail, more defined color, and no false color and no hint of rippling. The Galilean moons were now disks and slight differences in color of them individually was  suggested. Io was getting closer. Next came the 7mm and 5mm T6 Nags (93X and 130X) and the views were stunning! Perfect color fidelity, good saturation, and ever sharpening detail were the hallmarks of the views as Io approached the limb. I watched what seemed to be contact at 130X. I slipped in the 4mm Delite (163X) and could see the tiniest bit of blackness at contact; the arcs of the great disk and that of tiny Io were almost exactly tangent! I was mesmerized at such detail! I could actually see Io’s tiny disk passing behind Jupiter. I put in the 3mm Delite (217X) and could actually see a semicircular ‘bumb’ of Io as it dropped further behind Jove. And then, it was gone!

 

I spent the next hour, observing Jupiter and Saturn. Teasing out more detail teasing out more planetary detail using my Japanese set of filters that I’ve had for twenty years. I found that, as with previous experience, my #80A (light blue) accentuated detail by deepening color in the atmospheric bands while not noticeably skewing the colors. I also found that my yellow-green (#11) and light green (#56j  really deepened the browns and ochers, while skewing the whites to a pale yellowish or greenish tinge. Saturn was also wonderful, and extremely three dimensional looking. Again, the #11 and #56 deepened the tan cloud belts. I could see Cassini’s Division at 50X and at 130X and 163X I could trace it all the way around and note slight changes in color across the rings. I detected no false color in either Saturn’s or Jupiter’s views. The sky was black, the edges sharp and contrasted-natural planetary color meeting black sky. I even tried out my Vixen LV 2.5mm (260X) and the main things that I noticed were simply the much constricted FOV, that there was no more detail visible, and that the views were dimmer in comparison with the 3mm Delite. At the opposite end, I viewed the two with my 24mm Panoptic (27X) , and I lovely views of minuscule planets and tiny moons set amidst a field of pinpoint stars. And at this low power, Jupiters bands and Saturns rings were readily apparent. 
 

My main takeaways other than the wonderful views and the exciting disappearance of Io:

  • The Vixen ED102SS is really a wonderful apochromatic refractor. It performed much like my Takahashi FC-76, just had more image scale; views surpassed my much loved and long departed Edmund 4” F15 achromat with which I had many wonderful encounters with Jupiter and Saturn foe comparison. The only minus in that comparison was the huge depth of focus with the Edmund and the very shallow hair-trigger focus of the Vixen, of course that is to be expected with F6.5 compared to F15. Also I used circle T orthos with the Edmund (as I do with my Tak) as compared with the wonderful TV eyepieces I use with the Vixen.
  • This big alt-az rig is rock steady and very smooth in its motions. Vibrations dies down in less than a second, even at 217X, and it tracks  just fine once the altitude and azimuth tension knobs are properly adjusted and the scope nicely balanced (and balance never changed noticeably with the selection of eyepieces I used last night.
  • Easy setup and take down in minutes is worth its weight in gold, and this way beat my experience with the same scope and my GEM two nights earlier.

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#7979 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 13 October 2021 - 10:46 AM

So    being injured is such an awakening      one appreciates what one has when healthy and what one can still accomplish when injured or dealing with a set back   Thanks to Terra's timely heads up  I made myself go out with something I could handle to see Io duck behind Jupiter and was rewarded with great seeing.....

 

Last week, 6 weeks after my fall off the ladder and fracture of the lumbar spine, in a period of good seeing I had someone set up my Tak EM-10 mount and a good sized refractor.   After dark  I found that  the hand controller failed to operate   I did my best to use it manually  and it was ng. Frustrated I  gave up......

 

Fast forward to last night, with  really good seeing  I set up a fabulous yet  small scope ( the awesome FC-76 circa 1992) on the Unistar. At 7.45 Io was just starting its move to duck behind Jupiter. It was wonderful. Using my regular  everyday eyepieces, the Astro Tech ED Paradigms,  I was floored by the incredible detail on Jupiter. As power increased it just held wonderfully. With the Unistar mount it was all so simple and easy. Jupiter showed 6-7 bands and swirls I only get with the larger refractors.  I worked down from the 18mm to the 15mm to the 12mm  then 8mm to the 5mm. Just wonderful images. It was a night one could have pushed to try a 3mm   but I was not going back in the house.....because  Io closed the gap on the port side of the planet and eventually touched or set like the melting sun does  into the ocean in the West. I was half expecting it to widen and flatten as it appeared to land.  For 25 minutes the action was very interesting. It was 8.15 and Io still manifested itself as a mere pimple on the face of Jove and then she was gone....On to Saturn    more awesome and clear detail. Sharp Cassini division with the edges creamy white to jet black separation  contrast.  I could stare at this forever  and then the half moon.......

a great night made  possible only  with a realistic approach to what one can do and not thinking about what one cannot...and a classic apo of the highest quality


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 13 October 2021 - 01:02 PM.

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#7980 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 13 October 2021 - 10:48 AM

Nothing. Too much light pollution.  grin.gif

 

Clear Skies.  

 

Red lights are wind turbines.

Jeffery     that is a fabulous pic....... someday  I want to see that.....do you get spoiled where you live when it happens?

 

 

 

Terra     great  report. Thanks for the heads up on IO  BTW      Your post  motivated me out of the house and out of the doldrums      to get  under very good seeing  I might have missed    Thanks for detailing what you were using.  I need to get  a 4mm Delite. The 3mm Delite cannot be used often in my area   but last night I should have gone back to get it    it was one of those nights

Most times   the 5mm   are best     I suppose that  one night    I will get all my 5mm's out   I have some that are really good but I have never compared them. I used the 5mm Astro Tech ED last night    but I know the Nag T-6    5mm is the best in that series   and a favorite. I have the Tak 5mm and the Pentax XW 5mm as well... 

 

Last night was one of those great nights  when I remember why I sold the awesome  Vixen 80mm fl   to get the FC 76     it is  a special scope   and as stated in the  tired of the  "Hassel" thread   the Unistar helped a great deal.


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 13 October 2021 - 03:48 PM.

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#7981 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 13 October 2021 - 01:11 PM

Hello Zane

Hey there  it is great that you continue to do the sidewalk outreach thing in Stamford. Now that I am starting to heal please send me a note next time you do this as I would love to participate  thanks

Barry


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#7982 Bomber Bob

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Posted 13 October 2021 - 01:17 PM

Had a blast last night with 2 x small ultra-sharp refractors:  Jaegers 50mm F12Celestron C80P, with 2 x Tak prisms -- .965" in the J50, and 1.25" in the C80.  Seeing averaged 8/10, and temps dropped faster than forecast.

 

The spectros PL 5mm gives 125x in the J50, and the Moon, Saturn, & Jupiter were all picture-perfect with very hard to see false color at the limbs.  Got a bit of the Marble Moon Effect at 21x with that 1950s ASC 30mm Kellner.  But... I barely missed Io's disappearance -- didn't get set up until 1925L -- dang it!

 

The C80 continues to impress.  I had it stable & sharp at 284x with the AT Para 3.2mm -- 92x per inch! -- but I was tired after a busy work day, so most observing done at 227x with the TV Radian 4mm.

 

The fracs were side-by-side, and I rolled from one to the other on an old arm-less computer chair.  

 

In terms of resolution & contrast, I couldn't tell much difference between them at ~ 62x per inch, using the TV Nagler 5 in the C80.  The Public is gonna love the C80's views -- so much Punch! from a very light weight EQ Rig.

 

After The Giants, I went after globular clusters well east & north of the Moon with the J50 in negligible "glow" -- that's how clear the air was (and we have maybe another dry week shaping up).

 

For Tonight:  Gonna put the J50 & Tak FC-50 on the same Tak Sky Cancer EQ -- see if both stay sharp at up to 100x per inch...

 

BB's Tiny Tak Double Stack -- I bolted the J50's rail to the 1/4-20 on the top of the FC's cradle.  Looked strange, but worked well...

 

Up to 125x, the views were essentially identical for Saturn & Jupiter, except white zones were snow white in the Tak, and off white in the Jaegers.  Both showed Titan & Dione at the same powers.  Both showed 5-7 belts (2 were intermittent) on Jupiter, the GRS, & Io's shadow.  But at 160x, the Jaegers lost 3 belts to the Tak's one.  At 200x, I couldn't get a sharp limb with the Jaegers, and the details were fuzzy, while the Tak got dim, but stayed sharp.  Seeing was 8+ with very calm air at the start.  Clouds streaks moved in around 2005L from the SW; otherwise, I'd still be out there -- comparing double stars in this Double Stack.

 

BIF:  IF you've ever owned / used a Swift 838, my J50 is every bit as good optically.  I did not expect this from an old cemented objective, and in a tube assembly that I built.  We used to think that Tak made the Swifts; well, based on the Views, maybe Tak made the Jaegers... (sounds like a good folk tale!)


Edited by Bomber Bob, 13 October 2021 - 09:08 PM.

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#7983 oldmanastro

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Posted 13 October 2021 - 10:34 PM

 

Jupiter and Saturn were fabulous last night in my twenty year old 102mm Vixen apo refractor. It was quite exciting watching Jupiter’s tiny moon Io slowly disappear behind the limb of the massive Gas Giant! The telescope performed wonderfully! I set it up just as it was getting dark on the concrete walk in front of my garden shed where I have a perfect view of the eastern ecliptic. The air was still and getting cool as the evening came on. All of the earlier clouds had disappeared. Setup literally took less than three minutes. I had my big alt-az mount set up on its tripod near the french doors of my walkout basement. It was just a matter of opening the doors, grabbing the stiffened tripod by its legs just below the hub and carrying it out the door. Then I brought out the tele and slip its mounting rail into the jaws of the ADM saddle and locked it down. Then I went back in and grabbed my TeleVue eyepiece case and I was ready to rumble. Talk about grab and go… It was more like grab and gone. I sighted Jupiter in with my 19mm Panoptic. I could tell that the air was wonderfully stable. Conditions were perfect! Jupiter was bright and stark with no hint of false color on or around the orb at 34X. I could easily see bands even at this low power. The four Galilean moons were there and a smattering of stars were visible as well in the darkening sky. I put in the 13mm T6 Nagler (50X) and again, the stark whiteness of the orb with the subtle brown NEB and SEB were there and darker blue-grey temperate bands faintly appeared as thin parallel streaks. I cycled up to the 9mm T6. (72X). More detail, more defined color, and no false color and no hint of rippling. The Galilean moons were now disks and slight differences in color of them individually was  suggested. Io was getting closer. Next came the 7mm and 5mm T6 Nags (93X and 130X) and the views were stunning! Perfect color fidelity, good saturation, and ever sharpening detail were the hallmarks of the views as Io approached the limb. I watched what seemed to be contact at 130X. I slipped in the 4mm Delite (163X) and could see the tiniest bit of blackness at contact; the arcs of the great disk and that of tiny Io were almost exactly tangent! I was mesmerized at such detail! I could actually see Io’s tiny disk passing behind Jupiter. I put in the 3mm Delite (217X) and could actually see a semicircular ‘bumb’ of Io as it dropped further behind Jove. And then, it was gone!

 

I spent the next hour, observing Jupiter and Saturn. Teasing out more detail teasing out more planetary detail using my Japanese set of filters that I’ve had for twenty years. I found that, as with previous experience, my #80A (light blue) accentuated detail by deepening color in the atmospheric bands while not noticeably skewing the colors. I also found that my yellow-green (#11) and light green (#56j  really deepened the browns and ochers, while skewing the whites to a pale yellowish or greenish tinge. Saturn was also wonderful, and extremely three dimensional looking. Again, the #11 and #56 deepened the tan cloud belts. I could see Cassini’s Division at 50X and at 130X and 163X I could trace it all the way around and note slight changes in color across the rings. I detected no false color in either Saturn’s or Jupiter’s views. The sky was black, the edges sharp and contrasted-natural planetary color meeting black sky. I even tried out my Vixen LV 2.5mm (260X) and the main things that I noticed were simply the much constricted FOV, that there was no more detail visible, and that the views were dimmer in comparison with the 3mm Delite. At the opposite end, I viewed the two with my 24mm Panoptic (27X) , and I lovely views of minuscule planets and tiny moons set amidst a field of pinpoint stars. And at this low power, Jupiters bands and Saturns rings were readily apparent. 
 

My main takeaways other than the wonderful views and the exciting disappearance of Io:

  • The Vixen ED102SS is really a wonderful apochromatic refractor. It performed much like my Takahashi FC-76, just had more image scale; views surpassed my much loved and long departed Edmund 4” F15 achromat with which I had many wonderful encounters with Jupiter and Saturn foe comparison. The only minus in that comparison was the huge depth of focus with the Edmund and the very shallow hair-trigger focus of the Vixen, of course that is to be expected with F6.5 compared to F15. Also I used circle T orthos with the Edmund (as I do with my Tak) as compared with the wonderful TV eyepieces I use with the Vixen.
  • This big alt-az rig is rock steady and very smooth in its motions. Vibrations dies down in less than a second, even at 217X, and it tracks  just fine once the altitude and azimuth tension knobs are properly adjusted and the scope nicely balanced (and balance never changed noticeably with the selection of eyepieces I used last night.
  • Easy setup and take down in minutes is worth its weight in gold, and this way beat my experience with the same scope and my GEM two nights earlier.

 

Wonderful observing report Terra. That 102 Vixen refractor really delivered. The only time I ever looked through an APO it was a small 60mm Tak pointed at Jupiter. That was years ago and I never forgot the amount of detail visible for such a small aperture. The Vixen views must have been marvellous.

 

These days I'm just observing dust and clouds and then clouds and dust. Today a thunderstorm dropped 5 inches of rain in one hour. A neighbor's tree was hit by lighting about 5 blocks from here. Half of the tree landed on his roof. I have been observing atmospheric phenomena of the third planet from the sun.


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#7984 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 08:22 AM

Terra     one wonders if that big Orion fork like alt az would handle bigger scopes? Have you tried the Vixen 120S f6.67 on it?   


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#7985 steve t

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 08:23 AM

ALERT: Io goes behind Jupiter just after 8PM EDT tonight at 85W West Long. It’s still supposed to be 46% cloud-cover here so I’ll be playing tag with clouds and looking for sucker-holes.

I'm a little late to the party, but thanks for the heads up. We were clouded out, on our side of the river, for this event. I did enjoy your play by play of Io passing behind Jupiterwaytogo.gif


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#7986 Terra Nova

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 09:15 AM

Terra     one wonders if that big Orion fork like alt az would handle bigger scopes? Have you tried the Vixen 120S f6.67 on it?   

It does and quite well. In fact, the 120S is next up in the lineup, scheduled for the next clear night. It was the 120S that I purchased the mount for. It’s very stable and quite easy to move around.


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#7987 Star.Monger

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 01:38 PM

Late to the sunspot party as usual. I took a quick peek using my Edmunds 63 and a UO 16mm Koenig. Nice sharp views until the clouds rolled in.

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#7988 Bomber Bob

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 05:20 PM

Jaegers & Tak - Double Stack - on the Mizar AR-1:

 

50mm Double Stack (Jaegers & Tak) on AR-1 S02.jpg

 

Before I got my Swift 838, I thought the Japanese were nutz for putting a 50mm achromatic on an EQ mount...  well, I was wrong!   Astro, Nihon-Seiko, Nippon Kogaku, Takahashi, Vixen, et al. were definitely on to something Big in a Small Package.  BUT, to get the most from the least, it needs to be on a decent platform.  My Mizar AR-1 can carry a 6" F8 Newt, so the Stack is an easy carry.  If the clouds don't part tonight, SAT is forecast to be much better.  Double Stars for the Double Stack, Jack!


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#7989 Bonco2

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 07:47 PM

Finally had a chance to finish my optic comparo of my small telescopes viewing Saturn and Jupiter. This took over a month because of cloudy skies. Unfortunately these were not side by side comparisons but the sky conditions were similar. 

 

The players:

Unitron model 128 60mm f/15

Unitron model 142 75mm f/16

Carton 80mm f/15

Meade ETX 90

 

My biggest surprise was how well the 60mm Unitron stood up to the larger telescopes. It had comparable sharpness and contrast up to 128X

Also was impressed  that my El Cheapo Tasco 10K with Carton lens was equal to my much more expensive Unitron 75mm. To me it was a draw as to which was best.

The ETX 90 was some where between the 60mm and the larger scopes. At moderate magnification is was VERY sharp but after about 140X the 75mm and 80mm refractors held up better. 

Bill


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#7990 oldmanastro

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:07 PM

Finally had a chance to finish my optic comparo of my small telescopes viewing Saturn and Jupiter. This took over a month because of cloudy skies. Unfortunately these were not side by side comparisons but the sky conditions were similar. 

 

The players:

Unitron model 128 60mm f/15

Unitron model 142 75mm f/16

Carton 80mm f/15

Meade ETX 90

 

My biggest surprise was how well the 60mm Unitron stood up to the larger telescopes. It had comparable sharpness and contrast up to 128X

Also was impressed  that my El Cheapo Tasco 10K with Carton lens was equal to my much more expensive Unitron 75mm. To me it was a draw as to which was best.

The ETX 90 was some where between the 60mm and the larger scopes. At moderate magnification is was VERY sharp but after about 140X the 75mm and 80mm refractors held up better. 

Bill

Your experience with the Unitron vs Carton lenses is just like mine. When comparing observations with the 60mm f/15 Unitron lens (mounted on my 6305 Towa refractor) and the 60mm f/17 Carton refractor. It's very difficult to tell them apart. Both objective lenses deliver excellent performance.


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#7991 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 06:30 AM

Happy Birthday to Terrawaytogo.gif


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#7992 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 03:47 PM

This evening was not the best weather, partially cloudy with a possibility of showers. But there was a shadow transit in progress on Jupiter, and the Great Pink Spot was coming around, so I set up the Vixen 80L to have a peek.

Unfortunately, the air was so unsteady that I could barely make out the two main belts on Jupiter and an occasional white band. No sign of a shadow tonight.

Saturn was much better. At 100x I could see the polar area peeking out from behind the rings, the planet's shadow on the rings, some banding, and up to 3 moons. Saturn looked like it was under water, pretty clear but moving and warping but not smearing like Jupiter.

A heavy, solid cloud mass was moving in, so my last target was the moon. I only had a few minutes moon time before the clouds blocked out everything.

Fearing rain, I quickly brought the scope back in and called it a night.

Edited by Paul Sweeney, 15 October 2021 - 03:48 PM.

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#7993 Pete W

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 04:54 PM

A couple nights ago had the Sears 6339a in the backyard riding its native EQ head on slightly beefier wood tripod legs that came with my old Giro mount. For the past few months I've been using the long refractors on a Meade/Mizar EQ mount on the "beefy" Tasco 10TE tripod legs, but been underwhelmed with the stability - very shaky even with a homemade spreader tray and anti-vibe pads.    Was really surprised on the stability of the native mount on the Giro tripod.  The native 6339a settled down in under 2 secs.  Need to put the Mizar mount on the Giro legs to see if things improve.

 

Anyway...ended up tracking down bright planetaries with the 3" in 0.965 mode using its native colored eyepieces -  this is the first time I've used them, and was pleasantly surprised.  The green 22mm Kellner is a fine EP, but I was impressed by the 12.5mm (light gray, giving 96x) and 6mm (red, giving 200x) oculars.  The dark gray 9mm (133x) didn't seem as sharp for some reason(?).   The eye relief is a bit tight but not as bad as I expected.

 

M57: nice ring with the hole in the 12.5mm, but the hole was only obvious with averted vision.

NGC 7009 (Saturn neb., Aqr):  Bright and small in the 12.5mm.  In the 6mm the bright center was noticeably elongated, and a narrow halo seemed to surround the bright central region. The edges seemed to fade out - not sharp.

NGC 6818 (Sgr.):  Seemed larger than 7009.  With the 12.5mm it was round with a much more uniform brightness than 7009.  In the 6mm it was larger, and its un-sharp edges were more noticeable.

NGC 6543 (Dra). Looked a lot like 7009, but seemed smaller.  Bright center but more round than 7009, but like the others the edges seemed to fade out.

NGC 7662 (And):  Very nice contrast with the others.  In the 12.5mm it had much sharper edges than the others; bright and round but its center was not sharply bright like 6543 & 7009.  In fact with the 6mm and AV the center seemed less bright than the edges.

NGC 6826 (Cyg.): a "no sighting"  The tripod legs were in the way!  


Edited by Pete W, 15 October 2021 - 05:17 PM.

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#7994 Bomber Bob

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 05:28 PM

I won't mind cloud-dodging tonight with the Double Stack, cause I'm adding another BB-built scope to the mix:  That old B&L 40mm F10 Terrestrial Spotter that I made Astro by cannibalizing a Tasco 4VTE.  But it won't be piggy-back on the piggy-back, it'll be on the VersaGo.  

 

Lots of threads already about the pluses & minuses of sub-60mm refractors.  For those like Ole BB who live in the Big City, and think there's nothing to see when the planets aren't around...  Everything looks good in the Small Scopes.

 

B&L 40mm x 400mm F10

Tak FC-50 50mm x 400mm F8 fluorite APO

Jaegers 50mm x 626mm F12.5  

 

Yes, the BB-Built A. Jaegers is the Long Frac in the Trio.  

 

I love stars in these 3 at all powers.  At the low end, I can't imagine the dots being any smaller & still be visible; and, the 2 achros are very close to the APO in star colors.  And, at about 2x per millimeter, those perfect little Airy Disks.  I can soak in those quality views all night; but, there's the Double Stars, too.

 

A good thing that I like the stellar views, because the Moon & The Giants were in the murk.  Altair & north was clear, though.  I started in Lyra with the Double-Double, and worked east & north.  So many doubles in just Lyra & Cygnus.

 

IOW:  Regardless of your location, scopes, etc. it's better to focus on what you can see than on what you can't (yes, I complain about it, too!).


Edited by Bomber Bob, 16 October 2021 - 09:20 AM.

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#7995 oldmanastro

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 09:47 PM

A couple nights ago had the Sears 6339a in the backyard riding its native EQ head on slightly beefier wood tripod legs that came with my old Giro mount. For the past few months I've been using the long refractors on a Meade/Mizar EQ mount on the "beefy" Tasco 10TE tripod legs, but been underwhelmed with the stability - very shaky even with a homemade spreader tray and anti-vibe pads.    Was really surprised on the stability of the native mount on the Giro tripod.  The native 6339a settled down in under 2 secs.  Need to put the Mizar mount on the Giro legs to see if things improve.

 

Anyway...ended up tracking down bright planetaries with the 3" in 0.965 mode using its native colored eyepieces -  this is the first time I've used them, and was pleasantly surprised.  The green 22mm Kellner is a fine EP, but I was impressed by the 12.5mm (light gray, giving 96x) and 6mm (red, giving 200x) oculars.  The dark gray 9mm (133x) didn't seem as sharp for some reason(?).   The eye relief is a bit tight but not as bad as I expected.

 

M57: nice ring with the hole in the 12.5mm, but the hole was only obvious with averted vision.

NGC 7009 (Saturn neb., Aqr):  Bright and small in the 12.5mm.  In the 6mm the bright center was noticeably elongated, and a narrow halo seemed to surround the bright central region. The edges seemed to fade out - not sharp.

NGC 6818 (Sgr.):  Seemed larger than 7009.  With the 12.5mm it was round with a much more uniform brightness than 7009.  In the 6mm it was larger, and its un-sharp edges were more noticeable.

NGC 6543 (Dra). Looked a lot like 7009, but seemed smaller.  Bright center but more round than 7009, but like the others the edges seemed to fade out.

NGC 7662 (And):  Very nice contrast with the others.  In the 12.5mm it had much sharper edges than the others; bright and round but its center was not sharply bright like 6543 & 7009.  In fact with the 6mm and AV the center seemed less bright than the edges.

NGC 6826 (Cyg.): a "no sighting"  The tripod legs were in the way!  

This excellent report using the 6339 Sears confirms that these refractors are very good for DSOs. The very dark field of view helps combined, of course, with great optics. Your observations about the three original eyepieces, the 22mm K, 12.5 H and 6mm H match my own experiences with them. The 6mm H always delivers very good high power images in a comfortable field of view. Those of us who grew into the hobby with these eyepieces learned to work with their tight eye relief. I never even thought about it until eyepieces with better eye relief came into the picture. 


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#7996 highfnum

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 10:17 PM

its getting near Halloween

the monsters are coming 

boo! from Dynamax 8 

jupiter in red light 

moon

 

Capture 2021-10-15T21_28_59x8bE.jpg

 

Capture 2021-10-15T21_27_27dx8.jpg

 

 

Capture 2021-10-15T21_44_43dx8Eplt.jpg

Capture 2021-10-15T21_34_00dx8Ecrp.jpg

 

 


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#7997 highfnum

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 05:56 AM

dx8 ( perhaps a better shot?) Jupiter

 

Capture 2021-10-15T21_18_20dx8pe.jpg


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#7998 Terra Nova

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 11:33 AM

Some nice activity is in store for Jupiter observers tonight in the ETZ. The GRS will transit between 7:30pm and 11:00pm EDT, Ganymede will be visible crossing over the planet from sunset until 9:30pm, and Io will begin a shadow transit shortly after 11:00pm. Keep looking up! “Watch the skies! Keep watching the skies!”


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#7999 steve t

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 11:57 AM

Hi Terra,

Thanks for the heads up. Looking forward to giving it a try.

 

In SW Ohio it looks like we will have clear skies and the jet stream will have moved to the east of us, so we may be able to catch the show.

 

Steve


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#8000 steve t

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 01:36 PM

After yesterday's sun with no spots, there is a new, fair size one that has just rotated into view this morning. 

Steve


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