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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#8376 Augustus

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Posted 14 January 2022 - 10:44 AM

Phoenix is far worse IMO. Kitt Peak used to have a good deal of influence on limiting light pollution in the surrounding area. Flagstaff has good light pollution enforcement.


Work this week is actually about writing a webpage on Kitt Peak’s efforts to control light pollution over the next few fiscal years and the news is extremely encouraging.
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#8377 oldmanastro

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Posted 14 January 2022 - 11:04 AM

At last a nice clear,cool and dry night yesterday. Just a slight breeze from the east. The past first quarter moon was near the zenith but the sky was transparent. I decided to give the BL4000 a break and take a couple of lunar images with it. The telescope was quickly mounted in the Celestar wedgepod with the same adapter that I use for the Questar. I used the 30 and 18mm original ASP eyepieces that came with the telescope for the first time. Views of the moon were very good. Mare Humorum was near the terminator with Gassendi to the north and Vitello to the south. Even at 200x I was seeing a lot of detail in the crater and Mare area. To the north, the Sinus Iridium was just out of the terminator with wonderful contrast of the Jura mountains and promontories.  To the south, Clavius and its environs were already well illuminated. Using the ZWOASI224 I was able to take some images. The Mare Humorum and Clavius images are included. They are the result of 2000 frames stacked and processed Registax 6.

 

After the visual lunar tour and with Orion just a few degrees from the zenith, I went straight to some doubles in. This telescope has a very small amount residual astigmatism but it can deliver round Airy discs on stars. Zeta and Eta Orionis were easily resolved with the 6mm UO ortho (200x). Mu Canis Majoris provided a nice show of the blue secondary star with the 8mm Plossl (150x). Kappa Leporis also came through very well. The Trapezium was showing the E component during moments of excellent seeing. M42 looked nice in the 30mm ASP but even nicer with the 18mm ASP. On M41 the 18mm ASP provided the best view but the very best came from the 13.8 Meade WF eyepiece. It had the darkest background. Next in line was my surplus 17mm Erfle. I continued on the sky tour until midnight. At that time it was a cool 71 degrees.

 

The 30mm ASP Criterion eyepiece is a good one but the field of view is small even though it has a nice aye relief. The 18mm is by far the best eyepiece of the original two. It had a much wider field and a dark background. This BL4000 is not perfect but provides nice views even at low power. If they had taken better care with the correctors, these would have gone in history as premium telescopes. Compared to my old BL8000 this telescope is so much better. 

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#8378 LukaszLu

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Posted 14 January 2022 - 12:35 PM

Great result for a 4 ''!


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#8379 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 14 January 2022 - 02:19 PM

Today is probably the last day to see Mercury before it disappears into the sun's glare, so I packed up the Vixen 80L and set off for a hill with a good view to the west. But Mother Nature wanted to have some fun and brought down some heavy duty fog. I drove around for 45 minutes until I finally found a hilltop just above the fog.

I quickly set up and found Mercury about 5° above the distant treeline. Mercury was an obvious crescent, though it was tough to get a clear view due to the turbulence. I watched Mercury until it sank into the trees.

Saturn was a little left and above Mercury. You could tell it was Saturn, but that was about it. No details were visible at all.

Jupiter showed a few belts, fleetingly. The moons were nicely placed, though.

Then I split some doubles, starting in Lyre and working my way over to Orion. I had intended to finish off with the moon, but the fog was lapping at my feet, everything was dripping wet/coated in ice and I was freezing, so I packed it in, went home and am now sitting in front of a blazing fire!
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#8380 highfnum

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 06:24 AM

olmanastro

"If they had taken better care with the correctors, these would have gone in history as premium telescopes"

 yes indeed the whole series dx8 ..6 would have had a different history


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#8381 highfnum

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 06:31 AM

from 1 8 22

dynascope 4 inch

F12

Capture 2022-01-08T18_44_50dy4.jpg


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#8382 Bomber Bob

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 11:03 AM

We're in hunker-down mode:  Powerful winter storm barreling-down on The Swamp...  Forecasting snow tomorrow.  Snow?  In the heart of The South?  Inconceivable!!  Anywho, it may clear out by Monday night.  No sweat, I got scopes & such to pack...


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#8383 oldmanastro

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 11:16 AM

from 1 8 22

dynascope 4 inch

F12

attachicon.gifCapture 2022-01-08T18_44_50dy4.jpg

Nice image. Those long focus 4" Newts by Criterion and also Edmund Sci.  were excellent. This is an ad from a 1965 astronomy magazine. The price $49.95 was no easy pickings in those days. It amounts to $442.10 in todays dollars.

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#8384 Star.Monger

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 11:41 AM

Nice image. Those long focus 4" Newts by Criterion and also Edmund Sci.  were excellent. This is an ad from a 1965 astronomy magazine. The price $49.95 was no easy pickings in those days. It amounts to $442.10 in todays dollars.

 

 

I have 4" f/10 Carton mirror, bought it from Sheldon a few years ago.  Added a .75" 1/10 diagonal and an old Vega helical focuser, mounted on a Polaris.  For lunar/planetary, I often catch myself thinking I'd be perfectly happy/content if this was my only scope.


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#8385 mdowns

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 11:58 AM

Nice image. Those long focus 4" Newts by Criterion and also Edmund Sci.  were excellent. This is an ad from a 1965 astronomy magazine. The price $49.95 was no easy pickings in those days. It amounts to $442.10 in todays dollars.

Your pic is the one I had as a boy


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#8386 photiost

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 01:56 PM

from 1 8 22

dynascope 4 inch

F12

attachicon.gifCapture 2022-01-08T18_44_50dy4.jpg

Beautiful Lunar images ... what camera/settings are you using ?


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#8387 highfnum

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 03:20 PM

Asi 290 mini

You need 1.25 to .965 additional 

Screw off front nose of camera

About 17ms


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#8388 oldmanastro

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 03:20 PM

I have 4" f/10 Carton mirror, bought it from Sheldon a few years ago.  Added a .75" 1/10 diagonal and an old Vega helical focuser, mounted on a Polaris.  For lunar/planetary, I often catch myself thinking I'd be perfectly happy/content if this was my only scope.

Years ago I saved a Meade Goto 4" f/10 telescope from being trashed. I actually caught the owner placing the telescope, tripod and all, besides his trash cans. When I asked about it he told me to take it and even helped me get it into the car. After I got home I found that the tracking motors were working but the 494 hand controller was gone. I was able to get a used but good hand controller and control panel from Bill Vorce. In no time the telescope was functional but at first light I noticed that the optics were badly astigmatic no matter how well collimated they were. I got a new primary and secondary mirror from the people who were selling Coulter optics and that time. The new optics were excellent and the telescope provided many nights of excellent observations. Even the 494 controller worked better than my 497 controller on the ETX90. I will always regret getting rid of it years later. This was my first and only 4.5" Newtonian.


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#8389 Bomber Bob

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 03:35 PM

Not to tempt you, Guido, but... there's a Mizar 130SL rig on ZEN with the 1/20 wave mirrors decal...

 

(And an added Bonus:  Has the MMD-QZ quartz drive.)


Edited by Bomber Bob, 15 January 2022 - 03:37 PM.

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#8390 barbie

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 08:13 PM

Saturday evening I observed the moon for about 15 minutes with my newly acquired Sears 6333A 60mm f15 refractor. This sample has a fine objective lens and I'm looking forward to getting it out again when it's a wee bit warmer!!


Edited by barbie, 15 January 2022 - 08:16 PM.

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#8391 ccwemyss

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 09:33 PM

Viewed the Trapezium and moon for about 5 minutes each in the Pentax 85, with a 6mm Pentax Ortho (167X). I was testing the Celestron Logic Drive that I had just adapted to the mount, which is working very well. It was so nice to be able to just study objects at that power without turning the slow motion knob continually. The little drive kept them right where I put them in the view for the whole time. 

 

I didn't see E or F, but the scope was still settling a bit in the 7*F temperature. Carrying the OTA back into the house with bare hands was painful, and I put on gloves before grabbing the aluminum legs of the tripod to bring the mount inside. 

 

Chip W.


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#8392 oldmanastro

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 09:58 PM

Not to tempt you, Guido, but... there's a Mizar 130SL rig on ZEN with the 1/20 wave mirrors decal...

 

(And an added Bonus:  Has the MMD-QZ quartz drive.)

This is a great temptation but I doubt that it will pass through my budget manager who delivers a big sigh every time she goes by the telescope room. frown.gif lol.gif


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#8393 steve t

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Posted 16 January 2022 - 09:27 AM

Lately I've only been able to do solar observing since at night, when it's clear here in SW Ohio, the temperature drops into the teens (F).

 

Earlier this week I read on the Space Weather site that the current solar activity is ahead of what the experts had predicted so, as we get closer to the peak of this cycle the activity may become quite more active than expected.

 

OT

The other night we had clear skies, but it was so cold I didn't bother to take the 4" Newtonian out. From the sunroom I could see Vega twinkling above the horizon in the northwest and I wondered, could I split the Epsilon Lyra, with the 4" by observing through the closed window. Well, the answer came very quickly when I pointed the scope towards Vega. It was putting on quite a light show that reminded me of a 1970's, Dark Side of the Moon Laser Light show lol.gif I didn't bother with the double double lol.gif


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#8394 Pete W

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Posted 17 January 2022 - 04:06 PM

Assembled the Sears 6339a for the first time after refinishing the legs and re-painting the leg brackets to look at the sun in a cloudless sky.  The set up is a bit shaky with the metal eyepiece tray but it's not terrible; should be better tonight when the anti-vibe pads will be used.

 

The projection screen needs re-painted, but with its chips and scratches it ensures that the Sun will always have "spots" grin.gif

 

 

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#8395 oldmanastro

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Posted 18 January 2022 - 05:18 PM

Even with the full moon the sky was very clear and steady yesterday. It was not a DSO night but a good one for some double star hunting. The 4" f/13 Carton is just right for doubles. It is also my longest refractor. In a few minutes it was set up in the usual observing spot. I went after Struve doubles in Orion and ended up observing the following:

 

Struve 667, 710, 747, 734, 754, 725, 750 and 798. Burnham 1048 and 31 Orionis were also observed. In addition Iota Orionis provided an excellent display near M42. The Trapezium gave up component E. I was surprised of this due to the presence of the full moon but Orion was just a few degrees from the zenith in the darkest area of the sky. Most of the Struve doubles had good separations. I used my old Norton's to find the doubles. A newer paperback version of the Norton's doesn't include them. The image shows the Carton looking at Orion.

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#8396 Bomber Bob

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Posted 18 January 2022 - 05:44 PM

Well... Shoot!  I was hoping I'd get to re-test the Kenko SC125L tonight, but pesky thin cloud cover at the mid-levels have nixed it.  I may go out when the Moon is near meridian, but it ain't lookin' good...


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#8397 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 19 January 2022 - 03:00 AM

Woke up to clear skies, so I took the little Tasco 9T on a GP mount out to look at Venus, which had just risen. The skies were amazingly stable and I had a very nice view. The crescent is getting fatter, compared to the hair thin streak of a few days ago. I would estimate it at 180 to 190°. I watched it for quite a while. It was mesmerizing.

I also checked out the just past full moon. Here the sky was a lot less stable, but still good. Lots of nice detail on the terminator, and on the illuminated side, I could see mountains rising up against the black background.

Back to Venus for a last look, and then I headed in.

Edited by Paul Sweeney, 19 January 2022 - 03:00 AM.

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#8398 Pete W

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Posted Yesterday, 12:01 AM

Cold front came through Thursday bringing a clear but cold (for here) Friday night.   I recently got new contact lenses that are supposed to work near and far; I wanted to check them out stargazing to see if they are a better option than taking my glasses off and on.  I set up the 6339a on its native mount and tripod in the backyard.  Kept it in 0.965" mode, inspired by the 0.965" eyepiece thread on the Classics forum.  By the time I came in it was 32 deg, definitely chilly for these parts.   Learned that I still need either readers or a "fresnel" lens magnifier to read my charts with the new contacts.  Naked eye stars are nice and sharp, and its much easier using the finder than with my glasses.

 

Jumped around using 0.965 25mm & 12mm Celestron kellners and 7.5mm Ultima with a 0.965" thread on barrel.  Didn't keep track of all the targets so here's some highlights I can remember:

 

M1: The 1st thing I tracked down.  Quite faint but visible with averted vision as an elongated glow in the 25mm kellner.   

NGC 2362 cluster in CMa: in the 12mm (100x) it was nicely framed in the field of view, but perhaps too much power to make it really stand out.  Still, one of my favorites.

M79: The 12mm proved to be too much mag for this one, rendering it large but fainter than I expected.  I should have tried it with the 25mm, but didn't.  Nearby was the double HJ 3562, which showed up well in the 12mm.  The primary was a warm white or very pale yellow, plus there was a more distant star beyond the close companion that formed a nice grouping. 

32 Eri:  One of the surprises of the evening.  A yellow primary and a blue secondary about 7" away. The color contrast was quite apparent in the 3". 

Delta Gem: The orange primary and its tight secondary were quite steady with the 12mm. In fact, the pair was more easily seen in the 12 than in the 7.5mm Ultima. I'm thinking the seeing wasn't quite good enough to push magnifications beyond the 50X/in limit.  The 12mm kellner really impressed me tonight by also splitting...

Theta Aur:  Much tougher than delta Gem, but the tiny secondary popped out reliably in the 12mm.  The 2ndary was more easily seen in the 7.5mm but the 12 simply gave a more pleasing image.

sigma Ori: The 25mm pulled in the three bright members.  The 12mm pulled in the faint 10.5 mag member.  In fact, this faintest member of the group was significantly easier to see in the 12mm than in the 7.5mm.  Again, guessing that seeing had much to do with this.

Pi Ori:  Don't know if I've ever tracked this down.  A nice pair with a faint companion that is obvious with AV and detectable with direct vision.  Again, the 12mm provided the best view of the pair.

Eta Ori:  The 12mm showed a "snowman" with a tiny waist; during fleeting moments I almost convinced myself that the pair was indeed split in with the 12mm...

 

After selling the Jason refractor - the only exclusively 0.965" scope I owned- I find that I don't use the 0.965's much, but tonight's experiences with the 12mm will keep these gems in the eyepiece case. 


Edited by Pete W, Yesterday, 11:06 AM.

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#8399 Terra Nova

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Posted Yesterday, 10:55 AM

Great observing report Pete. I really enjoyed reading it. It’s been too cold up here to even motivate me to go out with binoculars!


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#8400 highfnum

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Posted Yesterday, 11:18 AM

edmund 3 inch f 15 

mare oriental daytime view 

mareoriented3E.jpg

l


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