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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#8951 Terra Nova

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Posted 21 June 2022 - 06:04 PM

Yeah I've been following that one too.  I did some experiments with filters on Sunday.  I tried a Hydrogen-Beta, an L-Extreme, and an L-Pro.  This was using a Lunt Herschel Wedge and an ND filter, so white light.  The filters didn't do much - they changed the overall color tint but I was not able to pull out any more details.   Was kind of disappointing;  the L Extreme is a dual narrowband H-alpha and O-III, 7nm wide for each.  Oh well, it cost me nothing and took a few seconds, since I already had the filters.

Your filter is off by two orders of magnitude. You need to go much narrower- in the neighborhood of 0.07nm (0.7Å) to see solar H-alpha details.


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#8952 norvegicus

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Posted 21 June 2022 - 08:22 PM

Your filter is off by two orders of magnitude. You need to go much narrower- in the neighborhood of 0.07nm (0.7Å) to see solar H-alpha details.

I know, and with more throughput; the glass filters would not let enough light through to see anything if they could achieve that bandwidth, which is why  you need an etalon, but I was expecting something.  

 

I can see some granulation near the limbs of the sun just in white light, as the surface curves away.  I was hoping to accentuate that a bit.


Edited by norvegicus, 21 June 2022 - 08:23 PM.

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#8953 oldmanastro

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Posted 22 June 2022 - 09:18 AM

After many days of dust, clouds and dust plus clouds, the dust cleared yesterday. At 10:00pm the cloud cover was sparse enough to allow some observations. It was going to be a short session so I grabbed my old Sears 60mm f/11 tripod and all. It was set up in less than a minute. When I looked at the sky, it reminded me of my first summer with this telescope back in 66. I took the original 15mm H, 4mm SR eyepieces and added a 6mm H, 9mm H and 22mm K. Then I went after old friends and observed the following:

 

NGC 6441- This was the first NGC I ever observed. On my first try there was a bit of haze over the Scorpion sting and the small globular was not observed. A bit later the area was crystal clear and it was there right besides G Scorpii in the 22mm K FOV. It came out well using the original 15mm H. Just a small fuzzy ball.

 

M7- This one was spectacular with the 22mm K. The cluster occupied most of the FOV.

 

M6- Not as rich as M7 but excellent with the parallelogram asterism around it's center.

 

M22- Easily found using the 22mm K. It was a big and bright fuzz ball with two dim stars on its side.

 

M4- I was surprised to observe M4 so easily with this scope under my current light pollution conditions. It was dim but right there in the center of the FOB

 

M80- This  globular is bright but small and sometimes escapes detection in a small scope. This time I pointed at the approximate position with the finder and caught it right there in the 22mm K FOV. The 15mm H showed the globular a bit better. 

 

Epsilon Lyrae- To split this double required the use of the 9mm H and 6mm H. The 6mm H gave the best views of the double-double. I tried the original 4mm SR and you could see the double but the chromatic aberration of this eyepiece killed the view.

 

Albireo - Cygnus was already high and this double delivered a great view with the 22mm K and 15mm H. The orange-blue color contrast was great. 

 

M57- The ring nebula was dim but well observed on the 22mm K. My first view of the nebula was with the 15mm H so I tried it. It was dimmer than I remember but back then the skies were so much darker.

 

I had been cloud dodging for about an hour now and a thick haze began to develop from the south east. It was everywhere in a few minutes. I waited a while but the haze just thickened further, the breeze died down and it was really hot and humid. It was time to quit. I took the whole scope in one hand, the observing chair in the other and everything came in together. No observing table or charts today. Just the telescope, the old eyepieces and ,the not so young now, me.

 

In the image the telescope was pointing at NGC 6441.  The focuser is a replacement. The original broke down years ago.

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#8954 Bomber Bob

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Posted 22 June 2022 - 01:47 PM

As of Right Now:

 

Fair 100°F (38°C)

Humidity 34%
Wind Speed N 12 mph
Heat Index 105°F (41°C)

 

So... No Way!   We're heading into our 3rd straight week of this... mess.  Ultimate Taunt:  Crystal Clear Skies with NO Moon, and my Jaegers 6" F5 all rebuilt & ready.  Been so long, I've forgotten what the stars look like!   I'll probably try going out around 2200L tonight (after soaking in DEET)... about 2 hours after sunset -- get a brief sample of what this old scope can do.

 

----------

 

Got in 2+ hours with the Jaegers 6 and FC-76 last night; well, mostly with the "new" Big RFT.  Started past the meridian in the Coma-Virgo Realm of Galaxies.  How many could the J6 show at just 20x / 50x / 75x??   NOT as many as my Meade 826, but almost a dozen.  I had the FC-76 out to align the finder on Vega.  Rather than galaxy hunt, I used it on some doubles, then locked it on M13, and did some high-power study (after my eyes had adapted) at 80x & 120x.  Got that granularity -- my eye straining to see stars; Tak Sharp matters with 3" aperture -- could make out zones within the core that I could've sketched if I hadn't been holding a sweat rag.  J6 star-hopped at 50x from M63 - M51 - M101.  Less river haze here, so very good views.  Ended with The Ring in both scopes:  nice details in both, but the J6 at 150x won -- bright "fraying" edges.  Best of all -- west breeze & no skeeters (though I did have to scrub all that DEET off).

 

Got a real appreciation for what a good 6" lens can show in town.  Take the J6 to the country?  It's gonna take a robust AZ mount head, and tripod.  My idea is to have both the J6 & SE120 balanced on it.  Not quite a bino-scope, but pretty dang close.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 23 June 2022 - 08:00 AM.

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#8955 CHASLX200

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Posted 22 June 2022 - 06:09 PM

As of Right Now:

 

Fair 100°F (38°C)

Humidity 34%
Wind Speed N 12 mph
Heat Index 105°F (41°C)

 

So... No Way!   We're heading into our 3rd straight week of this... mess.  Ultimate Taunt:  Crystal Clear Skies with NO Moon, and my Jaegers 6" F5 all rebuilt & ready.  Been so long, I've forgotten what the stars look like!   I'll probably try going out around 2200L tonight (after soaking in DEET)... about 2 hours after sunset -- get a brief sample of what this old scope can do.

Seeing was a 9 this AM and around a 8 the morning before.  The 826 is just nuts and my new 12.5" Obsession was doing 600+ this AM.


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#8956 deSitter

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Posted 22 June 2022 - 09:26 PM

Seeing was a 9 this AM and around a 8 the morning before.  The 826 is just nuts and my new 12.5" Obsession was doing 600+ this AM.

I like it when you are observing! Have a ball dude!

 

-drl



#8957 CHASLX200

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Posted 23 June 2022 - 05:51 AM

I like it when you are observing! Have a ball dude!

 

-drl

Only if the seeing is 8 or more.  Had the C102 out this am.  Seeing was down to a 7.  Jupiter still looks good with a 3.2mm and the moon is still full of detail with a 2.5mm. Mars is not much in a 4" vs a 12.5".


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#8958 steve t

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Posted 24 June 2022 - 07:09 AM

Most of my observing, over the past few weeks, has mainly been solar, this morning, with my +60 y.o. eyes, I observed the very thin, fingernail like, waning crescent moon nearly overhead. 

Steve T


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#8959 davidmcgo

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Posted 24 June 2022 - 08:18 AM

Woke up at the start of twilight and took out my 1975 C8 and plopped it on my pier in the yard.  Had excellent seeing, seems like the monsoonal humidity stabilized the temps as it was a very pleasant 65F.  The seeing was excellent, nary a ripple on Saturn with a 9mm Keller eyepiece and the Crepe ring stood out really well as did the cloud banding on the globe, Cassini’s division, and the usual retinue of moons.

 

Jupiter was comfortably high and really steady.  No Great Red Spot. I did see a moon shadow or small nodule below the SEB but haven’t checked the S&T app to determine which it was yet.

 

Mars showed the polar cap and a bit of dark shade but not any more than that.  Caught sunset on Sinus Iridium and a lot of good detail on the Aristarchus plateau and around Marius and Gassendi.  I’m struck by how different the color of these areas looks under waning illumination in the crescent phase compared to at lunar Sunrise.

 

I did also see Venus and Mercury naked eye.  The part of the sky they are in is not visible from where the scope pier sits.  Mercury was very easy even without binoculars.

 

All in all a fun little session and a chance to give my oldest Orange buddy some sky time!

 

Dave


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#8960 Terra Nova

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Posted 24 June 2022 - 12:56 PM

I had Goldie and Greenie out for a little fun in the sun today. Lots to see in both H-alpha and White Light. This is the way I remember the sun being! So glad it’s awake again. The little Pronto has been doing double duty the past two days, planets before sunup and sun before noon! So much to see, so little time! That’s why we need flexible, easily transportable scopes!

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Edited by Terra Nova, 24 June 2022 - 12:57 PM.

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#8961 Terra Nova

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Posted 24 June 2022 - 08:24 PM

I observed this sunset tonight with my classic eyes! love.gif

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#8962 steve t

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 07:34 AM

"That’s why we need flexible, easily transportable scopes!"

I agree with that statementwaytogo.gif

 

 

I observed this sunset tonight with my classic eyes! love.gif

Nice photo, we had the same type of skies in our part Ohio. It may be sacrilege to say this on CN, but boy I need some rain for the gardenspraying.gif Sorrysmile.gif


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#8963 Terra Nova

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 10:52 AM

Again today. Doing my daily check of sunspots. Greenie is always up to the task. love.gif

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#8964 John Higbee

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 10:49 PM

Did a star party at 4:30AM for five of my neighbors down here in the Northern Neck of Virginia (Bortle level 3 to 4 in our location). 

Sky was beautiful with several high clouds, but largely clear...autumn constellations were in full swing with Capella rising in the NE.

 

Did a 5-10 minute discussion of the "five planets plus the Moon", then went observing. Mercury rose at 4:11AM but was hard to see due to some horizon-hugging clouds and the beginning of morning twilight.  Aside from that the arc of Venus/crescent Moon/Mars/Jupiter/Saturn was truly impressive!

 

Used my 1977 C5 Orange Tube (at 50X) to show details as available.  Really liking this true "grab and go" instrument!

*  Saturn showed a sharply-defined disk and rings (and Titan off to the side)

*  Jupiter showed several cloud bands, with the four Galilean moons strung out (two on either side of the disk).

*  Mars was an orange-red dot 

*  the crescent Moon's terminator went through at lot of Mare terrain (what little mountain and crater detail was available was sharply presented)

*  Venus looked like a blindingly-white miniature of the gibbous Moon.

 

Everyone enjoyed the session (despite the mosquitos, which were ferocious) and went promptly back to bed by 6:15AM.

 

John 


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#8965 CHASLX200

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Posted Yesterday, 05:25 AM

Looked at Jupiter this AM with the 826. Seeing was a high 7 and the 3.2mm eyepiece gives the best view in this scope. The mirror cell is not so hot and them wing nuts sure hurt your finger and thumb trying to adjust them. I guess a Feather touch and new mirror cell would be a good upgrade.


Edited by CHASLX200, Yesterday, 05:25 AM.

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#8966 Lemmon714

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Posted Today, 04:39 PM

My (favorite) sister had a graduation party for her youngest daughter.  I decided to host a star party for the family.  We had three generations of the family together- Grandpop and Oma, the four siblings, and most of the nieces and nephews together.  My sister has much darker skies in her area.  

 

The day started with sunny skies and hot weather.  We spent time viewing the birds.  Eastern bluebirds, wood thrushes, catbirds, cardinals, crows, and few different songbirds.  I was convinced we would have a good night time observation.

 

When the night sky arrived around 9:15, the clouds began to accumulate in the sky.  I was barely able to get Vega and Arcturus.  The clouds were obscuring the view and I thought it would be a bust.  As luck would have it, the clouds began to move out and we were able to get a view of the sky.  I went through some star testing Vega and Arcturus with everyone to make sure they could adjust the focus and understand what we are viewing.  Leo was the first constellation to open up for viewing.  We spent some time looking at the constellation and then went for our first double of the night- Algieba.  Had a few oohs and aahs from the crowd as we cycled through the observing crew.  Then the Big dipper opened up for us.  I repositioned the scope to view Mizar.  We talked color and positioning to see who was paying attention.  I jumped around on some eyepieces to give them a feel for their field of view and general placement of the stars in the sky.  As the clouds changed position, we did too.  I jumped back to Lyra and Vega.  Again we went over colors and eyepiece selection.  I hopped to the double double and down to Cygnus.  When everyone stated to think they were experts, I hopped to Albireo and asked them not to spoil the view for the rest of the observers.  One by one they lined up and took in the view.  I didn't really need to explain the reason for taking them to this star last.  It was about 10:30 and I needed to get us home since my wife was volunteering at the wildlife center in the morning.


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