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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#9051 Piggyback

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Posted 03 August 2022 - 10:00 AM

Got a good look at a huge prominence today. My trusty 1986 Zeiss Telemator is fitted with a  0.7 Angström Beloptik H-Alpha filter setup and custom Starlight microfocusing assembly. So nice to see the sun roar back to life again!

 

 

Telemator von 1986_05red.JPG

 

Telemator von 1986_10red.JPG

 

Telemator von 1986_09red.JPG


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#9052 highfnum

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 06:12 PM

sun today edmund 3 inch

fc2_save_2022-08-04-124733-0000ed3-DNAIS.jpg


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#9053 highfnum

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 06:14 PM

not exactly a classic 

but i built open slit spectroscope 

like from 1868

same prom as above

i need to clean those crumbs

NAIS.jpg


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#9054 Terra Nova

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 06:54 PM

not exactly a classic 

but i built open slit spectroscope 

like from 1868

same prom as above

i need to clean those crumbs

attachicon.gifNAIS.jpg

I really enjoyed seeing it and chatting with you up on the hill at Stellafane.


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#9055 highfnum

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 10:09 PM

Thx Terra

You bought me luck

I got notice that I

won first prize in special mechanical 

Category 


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#9056 oldmanastro

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 10:22 PM

What I thought would be a longer session turned out to be a short 60 minute one. We had a very rainy day but by 10:00pm the sky had cleared with just a few clouds to the north. Saturn was already high. Thanks to the caster on the pedestal legs, I had the RV6 out in no time. Before Saturn I did some collimation fine tuning using Altair. Saturn was very crisp. I could see Titan Dione and Rhea quite well. The views were great with the 6mm UO ortho and the image held even at 300X with the 4mm UO ortho. The Cassini division was very clear as well as a couple of belts. The three satellites were visible at 300x. The session ended early due to incoming clouds and sure enough, rain. As the clouds approached the image began to deteriorate quickly. It was a pity because the seeing had been excellent and the sky had good transparency. The only inconvenience was that it is hot and very humid with almost no breeze out there. The views of Saturn with the 1974 RV6 compensated the heat.

 

BTW, I am really enjoying those beautiful solar shots with the classics. 


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#9057 steve t

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Posted 05 August 2022 - 07:57 AM

+1 on the great solar photos


Edited by steve t, 05 August 2022 - 07:58 AM.

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#9058 Lemmon714

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Posted 05 August 2022 - 11:34 AM

I went outside yesterday before dark and setup my Swift 50mm.  The weather reports indicated that we were in for clouds, rain, and lightning before 9:00.  I took in a view of the moon for about 30 minutes before sunset.  The skies were mostly clear with a few wispy clouds rolling in from the West.  I grabbed a few random 0.965" eyepieces and began my viewing session.  I had a 20mm and 18mm that gave me a full view view.  Images were clear, but the sky was still bright.  As I scanned my eyes up and down the terminator, I was able to see the "X" and "V" standing out just along the edge.  I took out a 12mm and started to zoom in on the letters.  I would prefer a dark sky so that they stand out but with the impending clouds I took in the views that were available.  I had to reposition the scope since the trees were getting ready to block my views.  After I repositioned, I noticed that the clouds were moving in quickly from the SW.  I packed up and went inside when I began to see the lightning in the distance and could feel the humidity traveling in my direction.  


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#9059 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 05 August 2022 - 12:01 PM

Yesterday was brutally hot, about 98°F You'ld think we were in Texas instead of Germany. In the evening there was a lot of heat turbulence. At 10 PM the first stars were coming out, so I brought out my Tasco 9t on a GP mount.

First target was the almost quarter moon, which was low in the SW sky. At low power (23x) I noticed 2 bright "letters". Up around Ukert there was a bright V visible, and next to Blanchinus I saw an X. Though I have heard of these, I never noticed them before. I tried looking for rille, but the unsteady air near the horizon wouldn't allow it.

Next I went to Vega. Straight up there was near perfect seeing. I could get two peanuts on the double double. M57 was just barely visible in the still bright sky. Albirio was really hard to find, but once I got it, it was really nice. I hit a few more doubles and then went to M13. Even in this little scope it is impressive. It was grainy, but I could not resolve any stars.

Finally, I went to Saturn, just coming up low in the SE sky. Here the seeing was pretty good and I could see a good amount of detail blinking in and out.

Clouds were coming in all this time, so I called it a night.
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#9060 clamchip

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Posted 07 August 2022 - 10:23 AM

I don't normally like doing comparo's but last night it was my Jaegers (Vixen Carton lens) 4 inch f/15 and

a Celestron/Vixen GP-C102 4 inch f/10.

The f/15 is just superb for stars, beautiful beautiful beautiful ! these are both star machines for sure.

Slight star color change with the f/10, no doubt a little CA cast over the whole picture, hardly noticeable, unless

you have just looked thru a f/15 !

My word, those tiny points of light, so much beauty. The double-double split into 4 at 80X and I could drive

a school bus between them.

Polaris b, usually hidden in the glare at low power is visible in both, piercing white hot, a touch more visible

in the f/15. Up the power and it moves out away from Polaris

M57 and the party was over, big disappointment compared to what I'm used to seeing in my Cave 10 inch.

The 10 inch Cave is a deep space tool, but in a way it's too big for stars, they are too bright, unless what

you are looking for is faint stars.

 

Robert


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#9061 semlin

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Posted 07 August 2022 - 12:02 PM

i am just back from vacation and i hastily first lighted my new to me and not properly set up 1976 c8 on the moon and saturn.   conditions were clear with some intermittent convection currents to wait out for the moon as i view it across a lake and there is a forest fire over there just now, but i got a pretty clear shot at saturn (although the moon caused some glare issues as it set).

 

the c8 is my first view with this size of aperture and the moon was pretty amazing.  i worked my way from a 40mm plossl to a 7mm nagler with some impressive views from familiar eyepieces at unfamiliar magnifications.  a 4.7mm wa did not quite get sharp enough to call it focussed, but still revealed a lot of detail.  coming from some pretty long refractors, the additional brightness and magnification was very impressive.  

 

then i tried to view saturn with the c8.  i should have at least switched to alt-az but instead i tried my luck with no finder installed, a rough guess on polar alignment, the wedge not adjusted (afterwards i realized it is set at max elevation), and no fine adjustment on the declination (i need a battery for the controller).  somewhat amazingly, i quickly got saturn in view with the 40mm and a 25mm ortho but i could not track it using just a (misaligned) ra fine adjustment to be able to try other eyepieces.  i got enough of a view to see enormous potential and also that i need to do some collimation work.  i forgot to do a star test, but there was some clear signs of misalignment on saturn, and some light scatter on the moon.

 

then i went to work with the more familiar to me rao r73 to compare.  the moon was exquisite all the way to 4.7mm.  at f18 and a 3" aperture the rao is a very different view to the c8 with the same eyepieces.  the r73 cannot compete for big picture but it is i think sharper and gives better contrast even as it may reveal less detail.  it's harder than i expected to compare  views given the magnification and brightness differences.  for now, it's like comparing a very sharp 7x35 bino to a less sharp 10x50 wide angle.  i hope to get the c8 sharper to make a comparison easier.

 

once again, i did not have proper polar alignment (my house blocks polaris), and i recently installed a polarex 127 40mm on the r73 guidescope rings and now immediately discovered this made the small finder very inaccessible and unusable.

so saturn was some work to get down to 7mm.  it was worth it. i have had a rough year of clouds and low lying haze so this was the most detail i have seen with saturn.  at 200x i could see surface striping and make out some ring variation although perhaps because of the detail the cassini gap was not as distinct as i have seen it before.  the 7mm nagler was not quite as bright as i would want, but it did reveal a deep star field behind the planet of tiny star pricks which was very beautiful to behold.


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#9062 norvegicus

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Posted 07 August 2022 - 12:53 PM

i am just back from vacation and i hastily first lighted my new to me and not properly set up 1976 c8 on the moon and saturn.   

Get it collimated and the C8 may become your Saturn tool.   My C9.25 has become mine.

 

All you need is a screwdriver and a slightly defocused star.  You can get really close with an artificial star, like a big ball bearing with a flashlight or the sun shining on it, which is convenient since it doesn't move!

 

You might become a mirror guy.  shocked.gif


Edited by norvegicus, 07 August 2022 - 12:55 PM.

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#9063 clamchip

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Posted 08 August 2022 - 06:49 PM

I don't normally like doing comparo's but last night it was my Jaegers (Vixen Carton lens) 4 inch f/15 and

a Celestron/Vixen GP-C102 4 inch f/10.

The f/15 is just superb for stars, beautiful beautiful beautiful ! these are both star machines for sure.

Slight star color change with the f/10, no doubt a little CA cast over the whole picture, hardly noticeable, unless

you have just looked thru a f/15 !

My word, those tiny points of light, so much beauty. The double-double split into 4 at 80X and I could drive

a school bus between them.

Polaris b, usually hidden in the glare at low power is visible in both, piercing white hot, a touch more visible

in the f/15. Up the power and it moves out away from Polaris

M57 and the party was over, big disappointment compared to what I'm used to seeing in my Cave 10 inch.

The 10 inch Cave is a deep space tool, but in a way it's too big for stars, they are too bright, unless what

you are looking for is faint stars.

 

Robert

Boy did I get spoiled by my 4 inch f/15 the other night. 

What a star machine, I want more of this perfection in the eyepiece.

So it's onwards and upwards my 4 inch friend.

To the stars we go !

 

Robert


Edited by clamchip, 08 August 2022 - 06:50 PM.

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#9064 semlin

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 12:05 PM

there was cloud cover and a light forest fire haze last night with not much chance of observing anything at high magnification, so instead of a telescope i pulled out a b&l balscope "senior" spotting scope and a bushnell binofoto 7x50 monocular and had a go at the cloud streaked moon.

 

the 7x50 gave great views with the moon in a field of fiery clouds that looked like a jmw turner painting.  

 

the balscope was sharper than i expected and gave the moon a strong floating effect.  at times it seemed suspended in front of the light cloud fields that passed it.  very dramatic.  i want to try the eyepiece (30x) in a telescope now.

 

next time i will try for some photos.

 

 

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#9065 clamchip

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 04:26 PM

To my surprise M57 looks identical in my C6 SCT as my 4 inch f/15.

For years I always thought take a reflector aperture, subtract the secondary, and this will give you

the equivalent refractor aperture. In this example: 6 - 2=4, it seems to work.

High power stars are much different looking in my C6, most noticeable is the extra diffraction

rings around the airy disk.

 

Robert


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#9066 Garyth64

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Posted 11 August 2022 - 07:23 AM

I've seen that used a lot, but I believe it is incorrectly applied.  Most places use the diameter of the secondary to the diameter of the primary. So for a 6" scope with a 2" secondary, the secondary size is 33% of the primary.

 

But another way that I believe is better, is to use the area of each.  So a 2" secondary only blocks 11% of the incoming light on a 6" primary.  So it reduces the incoming light.  And from that IMO it would be better to say that the effective aperture would be 5.3". (100% - 11% = 89%.  89% x 6" = 5.3")

But that doesn't reduce the resolving power of the 6" aperture, it stays the same.

 

smile.gif


Edited by Garyth64, 11 August 2022 - 07:25 AM.

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#9067 clamchip

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Posted 11 August 2022 - 10:22 AM

And then we must figure in reflector reflective surface losses, and 2 to 3 passes thru the reflector's

tube, and refractor lens losses from absorption and reflection and it's inability to focus all light to the same

point.

I should probably be using M13 rather than M57 for my equivalent aperture test. This would add resolution

to the experiment. I've done this before and all I remember is, well come to think of it, I don't remember !

I think what's going on with this test is I'm desperately trying to prove to myself that yes a 4 inch f/15 can

be my primary telescope.

 

Robert


Edited by clamchip, 11 August 2022 - 10:26 AM.

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#9068 norvegicus

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Posted 11 August 2022 - 10:57 AM

Also loss of contrast due to the obstruction.


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#9069 Bomber Bob

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Posted 11 August 2022 - 12:14 PM

I must've ticked-off Thor:  Had the Jaegers 50 on the ready line, and not a cloud in the sky at 1800... By 1900, overcast skies, lightning!! & thunder, and high winds -- more limbs & branches to remove this weekend.

 

I ain't livin' right.


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#9070 clamchip

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Posted Yesterday, 10:31 AM

I think it's official, my primary telescope is my 4 inch f/15.

"I think" because I can't believe it when just a week ago it was a Cave 10 inch.

It all depends on what you are planning on observing. This reinforces my thoughts

on owning more than one telescope.

I've given my 4 a name, 'Star Machine' because it is magnificent for observing stars. 

I usually observe Stars with a 60mm I never thought to use a 4 inch.

 

Robert


Edited by clamchip, Yesterday, 10:38 AM.

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#9071 Bomber Bob

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Posted Yesterday, 11:22 AM

I think it's official, my primary telescope is my 4 inch f/15.

"I think" because I can't believe it when just a week ago it was a Cave 10 inch.

It all depends on what you are planning on observing. This reinforces my thoughts

on owning more than one telescope.

I've given my 4 a name, 'Star Machine' because it is magnificent for observing stars. 

I usually observe Stars with a 60mm I never thought to use a 4 inch.

 

Robert

I completely understand...  Now, imagine a 4" F10 that performs like an Edmund F15... that scope is my Dakin 4.  On some objects, like Jupiter, I see more details; on others, a bit more false color, which makes it a wash overall.  The Dakin isn't lighter, but it's about 20" shorter, and has a quality 2" focuser.

 

Imagining confirms my visuals:  Best Jupiter shots in the Dakin, Best Saturn shots in the Edmund.


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#9072 Senex Bibax

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Posted Today, 06:36 AM

Woke up early three hours ago, looked out my back door and the sky was beautifully clear, and the Moon was beginning to sink into the trees out front, so I grabbed my Omcon 4" refractor for a quick peek before it started to get too light. Got some good views of Jupiter, with three of its satellites, and visible cloud bands. Next up was Mars, looking brighter than it has for quite a while. Nice small red disk but no observable features. Next, a quick sweep of the Pleiades. Finally, with Orion clearing the eastern horizon, I got a quick look at the Great Nebula but the sky was already brightening enough to start washing out the view.


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#9073 Terra Nova

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Posted Today, 07:49 AM

I walked out on the deck this morning at 6 o’clock on the coffee was percolating. It was so cool to see Orion coming up through the trees. Aldebaran was way up high and the Pleiades were higher. A few minutes ago I went to the sunroom to open the window and let some of the cool morning air into the house and the moon hung strangely low to the south. It was just a big beautiful full moon but so low! I’m looking forward to seeing Sirius blazing away in the late August sky; then I’ll know that the Dog Days are really here. ;)

 

Currently, we’re far from the Dog Days of Summer. Yesterday afternoon it was only 77° under the covered portion of my deck and this morning it was only 55°. Maybe we will have an early Fall. I’m totally up for that. I love the Autumn. It’s my favorite time of the year.


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#9074 steve t

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Posted Today, 08:34 AM

Beautiful skies in SW Ohio this morning.

I set up the 4" Newtonian last night before going to bed with plans on getting up around 1:00AM to observe Jupiter. Unfortunately, I oversleptrolleyes.gif 

Not all is lost, once the Sun clears the trees, I'll get some solar observing in.  


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#9075 Bomber Bob

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Posted Today, 11:09 AM

TTGL (Thank The Good Lord)!!  Got in some Solar Observing this morning -- before The Heat gets Lethal...  TS-50/700 + Lunt Wedge gave sharp views at 70X & 100x.

 

6 Groupings:  The largest spot in one cluster had a horseshoe center.  Hope these clear skies hang around after sunset.


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