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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#9176 Terra Nova

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Posted 24 September 2022 - 10:00 AM

At one point I saw a steady stream of at least 30 satellites, all in the same orbit from NW to SE, evenly spaced a few seconds apart...”

 

The bane of astro-photographers/imagers they afford something of a new direction in the hobby for some of us, myself included. I have instruments and mounts, both telescopes and binoculars that are well suited for tracking satellites and I get a kick out of it. Like they say, “When someone gives you lemons, turn them in to lemonade!” wink.gif


Edited by Terra Nova, 24 September 2022 - 10:21 AM.

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#9177 Bomber Bob

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Posted 24 September 2022 - 10:27 AM

At one point I saw a steady stream of at least 30 satellites, all in the same orbit from NW to SE, evenly spaced a few seconds apart...”

 

The bane of astro-photographers/imagers they afford something of a new direction in the hobby for some of us, myself included. I have instruments and mounts, both telescopes and binoculars that are well suited for tracking satellites and I get a kick out of it. Like they say, “When someone gives you lemons, turn them in to lemonade!” wink.gif

Yep.  And as usual, my timing stinks:  Just when I get the gear to try some DSO Imaging...  So Many Satellites!  Seemed like I saw at least 1 last night in about every constellation.  I have mistaken some for meteors.  Did see an actual meteor last night in Sagitta, and followed it with the J6 -- it was leaving a very faint trail, and tumbling until it burned-out...


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#9178 Bomber Bob

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Posted 24 September 2022 - 03:54 PM

My DSO Odd Couple:

 

Jaegers 6 F5 - Edmund 6 F4 S02 - SV M-7 AZ (FL BK).jpg Jaegers 6 F5 - Edmund 6 F4 S03 - SV M-7 AZ (ZM BK).jpg

 

 


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#9179 clamchip

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Posted 25 September 2022 - 12:17 AM

I had my Questar 8 out this evening.

I was having a gay time until I touched up collimation with my flashlight and noticed my telescope

myself and my eyepieces were being showered by ash from the wild fire up north about 50 milesfrown.gif

Oh well the damage was done, good thing I have my puffer.

So I continued on. M13 straight on vision just beautiful, no need for averted vision with this scope.

Double-double splits easy at low power and this is a cat. Just for fun I kept going with power to

400X on the doubles, magnificent.

I decided to do the same with Saturn, 400X and sharp as ever. Cassini looked like a sharpie

marker, the planet was huge at that power.

This is what happens when you get collimation spot-on. Take your time and spend multiple evenings

getting it right and you will be rewarded.

Robert

 

IMG_0979.jpg


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#9180 Terra Nova

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Posted 25 September 2022 - 09:06 AM

Not classic telescopes but classic binoculars. The sky cleared last night between 11:00 PM and Midnight to allow a pleasant hour to peruse the Autumn sky with my Zeiss West (Oberkochen) 15x60s and my Soviet Tento 20x60s (recently cleaned, collimated, and edge-blackened by Suddarth Optical. The skies were down to Mag 5 and the Great Square of Pegasus was nearly overhead. Aquila was setting and Perseus was well up in the East. The Northern Milky Way was fabulous with open clusters on through into Cassiopeia and The Great Spiral, M31 was fabulous, extending across the field. Both binoculars performed wonderfully but the 15x60 Zeiss will always be my favorites, showing the most beautiful pinpoint stars all the way to the edge. I also have 10x50 CZJ Dekarems which were cleaned and collimated by Suddarth and perform wonderfully (especially on the moon), but for star fields, nothing beats the ZW 15x60s. Jupiter was high up and blazing away, showing a perfect pale disk with two darker ruddy brown belts and it’s lovely moons in the Tento 20x60s. If you’re not into classic binocular collecting and observing you might think about it. They are much easier to store than telescopes.


Edited by Terra Nova, 25 September 2022 - 09:13 AM.

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#9181 Bomber Bob

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Posted 25 September 2022 - 10:41 AM

Last night was a repeat of FRI night -- but with much better planetary seeing:  Got the FC-100 up to 300x on Saturn, and 240x on Jupiter; and, the FC put a micro-bit of belt color to Saturn, and a bit more on Jupiter.  Most pleasing to me:  It resolved contours both along belt edges, and within J's belts.  Very sketch-worthy.

 

My Big RFT Twins are joy to use.  Gotta take 'em to the country this winter.  THEY kept me out past midnight.  Used all 2" accessories in both.  With the CLS in the J6, got a hint of the North America nebula -- a sort of horseshoe-shaped collection of blobs.  I don't think I've ever seen it from my backyard before -- except maybe in my 20x60 binos.


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#9182 clamchip

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Posted 25 September 2022 - 11:04 AM

After last night, I know what I want, it's my Sears 90mm.

The C8 performed flawlessly but the whole time I was comparing the C8 to my Sears, trying the

best I could to find some reason to fault the C8 and grab the Sears.

The C8 is fantastic, the Sears is fantastic.

While comparing I noticed some interesting things.

The 90mm was the better of the two for double stars. Clean bright airy disks in the Sears, the C8

a nice airy disk but strong rings around the airy disk confusing to verify a separation.

Not much of a difference on M57 the ring nebula except the C8 could out enlarge the ring. But

even when its bigger there's not much difference I can see.

M13, the C8 clearly resolved more stars and it was all right there with straight on vision. With a

little help from averted vision the 90 barfed up a surprising view for a 90mm.

Saturn, same thing I could blow up the planet much larger and see far more detail with the C8.

The C8 is a remarkable planet scope.

I have a strong bond with Sears, it was my store. I watched them build our Sears. The largest

Sears west of the Mississippi. It was 4 floors and had elevators and escalators.

I would ride my bike to Sears and buy tools and of course hit the lavish candy counter.

The live manikins were so cool, I'll never forget those dolls.

In more recent years I bought all my clothes at Sears. And appliances, and more tools.

Even though telescopes were never displayed in the store I wanted one more than anything.

The telescope were actually quite expensive.

The 90mm is Sear's Cadillac, top of the line with all the bells and whistles. And our Sears

store was definitely the top of the line in our neighborhood and for miles around. The Sears

90mm is a nice something to keep and remember the old Store.

Our Sears, it was built to last forever, I watch them build it in 1970 the same year my Sears 90

was built.

The Sears is gone now, just a hole in the ground. I watched as they tore it down.

 

Robert


Edited by clamchip, 25 September 2022 - 12:41 PM.

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#9183 Terra Nova

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Posted 25 September 2022 - 11:18 AM

I’m so sorry to see Sears gone! I always loved and looked forward to the Christmas catalog every year growing up. And Sears was my first real job when I started college and transitioned from baby sitting, pet sitting, and watering lawns to retail. It was a new store in our new mall and I loved that! Sears was something I always thought would be around forever. They truly were America’s store! 


Edited by Terra Nova, 25 September 2022 - 11:25 AM.

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#9184 Terra Nova

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Posted 25 September 2022 - 01:46 PM

I did a little solar observing today. Lots to see in both white light and hydrogen alpha. It’s so nice to have an active sun again. The telescopes are my old tricked out Mayflower model 814 (60mm x 700mm), and my Coronado Solar Max II 40mm x 400mm.

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#9185 steve t

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Posted 26 September 2022 - 08:10 AM

As Bomber Bob and Terra mentioned, there is a lot of activity currently going on. Yesterday using my 4" Newtonian, at 62x, I counted just over 50 small to fair size induvial spots in four groups. 

The skies are clear, this morning, so I'm waiting on the sun to clear the trees, so I can do another check.


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#9186 Bomber Bob

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Posted 26 September 2022 - 03:52 PM

Did a scope swap at lunch -- mainly to stage the Vixen SPC-60L for star & sky testing (perfect Newton Rings, BTW) -- then realized after I was done that all I had in the shed was Refractors...  so, the Mizar Comet joined the pack.  This may be the last night in a week for any observing.


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#9187 highfnum

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Posted 26 September 2022 - 10:32 PM

saturn with classic beelzebub scope  

dynamax8

Capture 2022-09-26T22_40_35dx8-Dese.jpg


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#9188 steve t

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Posted 27 September 2022 - 07:36 AM

saturn with classic beelzebub scope  

dynamax8

attachicon.gifCapture 2022-09-26T22_40_35dx8-Dese.jpg

Nice waytogo.gif


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#9189 JoshUrban

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Posted 27 September 2022 - 07:58 AM

I hauled on the 1957 Celestar 4" (Fecker) fork-mounted speckle green newt last night to drink in some starlight...What a nifty little scope!  Saturn was sweet, there were hints of the GRS on Jupiter, and M15 showed hints of resolution with a 15mm Panoptic barlowed 3x (Siebert modular barlow.)  It was a quick but fun session...something about the classics!


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#9190 Bomber Bob

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Posted 27 September 2022 - 09:28 AM

Go Little Orange! -- Star & Sky Testing the Vixen SPC-60L (60mm F15) last night.  I had the TS-65/P out also, but not for a SxS on every object (and, I just wanted to use it).  TAK prisms in both; spectros .965" in the Vixen, and AT Paradigms in the TAK.  Seeing around 8, with Ian spinning a few high-altitude cirrus in the SW quadrant.

 

Vega, Deneb, & Altair showed identical disks on either side of focus with no obvious defects.  The TS had much less purple haze around Vega than the 60L; and, overall, star colors are truer in the Triplet.

 

Saturn & Jupiter:  60L is sharp on both limbs up to 180x (75x per inch), which is a solid Excellent on my Achro quality scale.  3D Rings at 90x., with a hairline Cassini.  Jupiter has 4-6 belts, and a tough but visible receding GRS -- all in grays.

 

Epsilon Lyrae:  TS shows a hairline split + Figure 8 at 34x; takes 46x in the 60L to get a similar view.  My favorite view is at 90x -- intersecting / interacting rings + super-sharp Airy disks.

 

Once again, Vixen packs high-quality glass in a lighter-than-peers OTA.  It's a definite Keeper, and much more than a Display Scope.


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#9191 miniqtone

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Posted 27 September 2022 - 11:19 AM

Go Little Orange! -- Star & Sky Testing the Vixen SPC-60L (60mm F15) last night.  I had the TS-65/P out also, but not for a SxS on every object (and, I just wanted to use it).  TAK prisms in both; spectros .965" in the Vixen, and AT Paradigms in the TAK.  Seeing around 8, with Ian spinning a few high-altitude cirrus in the SW quadrant.

 

Vega, Deneb, & Altair showed identical disks on either side of focus with no obvious defects.  The TS had much less purple haze around Vega than the 60L; and, overall, star colors are truer in the Triplet.

 

Saturn & Jupiter:  60L is sharp on both limbs up to 180x (75x per inch), which is a solid Excellent on my Achro quality scale.  3D Rings at 90x., with a hairline Cassini.  Jupiter has 4-6 belts, and a tough but visible receding GRS -- all in grays.

 

Epsilon Lyrae:  TS shows a hairline split + Figure 8 at 34x; takes 46x in the 60L to get a similar view.  My favorite view is at 90x -- intersecting / interacting rings + super-sharp Airy disks.

 

Once again, Vixen packs high-quality glass in a lighter-than-peers OTA.  It's a definite Keeper, and much more than a Display Scope.

You make me excited for my upcoming acquisition, which judging by your report I may well have underestimated! Fingers crossed lol


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#9192 Kasmos

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Posted 27 September 2022 - 03:11 PM

Go Little Orange! -- Star & Sky Testing the Vixen SPC-60L (60mm F15) last night.  I had the TS-65/P out also, but not for a SxS on every object (and, I just wanted to use it).  TAK prisms in both; spectros .965" in the Vixen, and AT Paradigms in the TAK.  Seeing around 8, with Ian spinning a few high-altitude cirrus in the SW quadrant.

 

Vega, Deneb, & Altair showed identical disks on either side of focus with no obvious defects.  The TS had much less purple haze around Vega than the 60L; and, overall, star colors are truer in the Triplet.

 

Saturn & Jupiter:  60L is sharp on both limbs up to 180x (75x per inch), which is a solid Excellent on my Achro quality scale.  3D Rings at 90x., with a hairline Cassini.  Jupiter has 4-6 belts, and a tough but visible receding GRS -- all in grays.

 

Epsilon Lyrae:  TS shows a hairline split + Figure 8 at 34x; takes 46x in the 60L to get a similar view.  My favorite view is at 90x -- intersecting / interacting rings + super-sharp Airy disks.

 

Once again, Vixen packs high-quality glass in a lighter-than-peers OTA.  It's a definite Keeper, and much more than a Display Scope.

Mine is also very very good. Until the Tasco 227x was tuned up, the Vixen was clearly at the top of the heap of my 60/900mm class scopes (and I have several of them). It's almost too close to call, but the Tasco seems to beat it by a hair. It would probably take a DPAC to settle it.


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#9193 lrossi

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Posted 27 September 2022 - 03:39 PM

This past weekend was the first time observing with my Edmund Scientific Astroscan. It was sharper than I expected from this "toy" scope, and has nice sweeping wide angle views even with the 15mm Plossl (the only original eyepiece I have for it). This is one of the newer ones, not sure the year, but it has the black hand screws and eyepiece tube (not the silver ones of the earlier models).

 

What did I observe? Mostly the bright nebula (Swan, Eagle, Lagoon, Trifid) and clusters in the Sagittarius region, and open clusters in Cassiopeia. The Owl cluster in particular was gorgeous. I need to try with a lower power eyepiece as well, especially for exploring along the Milky Way.

 

As I don't have a finder scope on it, it's hard to find much of anything, especially at the zenith. I mostly just randomly wandered along the Milky Way from a fairly dark site. Need to get a finder!

 

But it is a fun little scope.


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#9194 Jehujones

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Posted 27 September 2022 - 09:37 PM

This past weekend was the first time observing with my Edmund Scientific Astroscan. It was sharper than I expected from this "toy" scope, and has nice sweeping wide angle views even with the 15mm Plossl (the only original eyepiece I have for it). This is one of the newer ones, not sure the year, but it has the black hand screws and eyepiece tube (not the silver ones of the earlier models).

 

What did I observe? Mostly the bright nebula (Swan, Eagle, Lagoon, Trifid) and clusters in the Sagittarius region, and open clusters in Cassiopeia. The Owl cluster in particular was gorgeous. I need to try with a lower power eyepiece as well, especially for exploring along the Milky Way.

 

As I don't have a finder scope on it, it's hard to find much of anything, especially at the zenith. I mostly just randomly wandered along the Milky Way from a fairly dark site. Need to get a finder!

 

But it is a fun little scope.

No, don't mess it up. Keep it simple and pure.


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#9195 Lentini

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Posted 28 September 2022 - 01:30 AM

Enjoyed comparing scopes and eyepieces and filters in my refractors after noticing Jupiter was in the hole in my trees. Was surprised to see a Ganymede shadow-transit in progress!
 

Best view was using Takahashi TS-80 with Omegon GPC, Linear Binoviewers, and 12.5mm Tak Abbe Orthos.

 

Saw Mars was rising, but I couldn’t catch any detail other than the phase. 

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#9196 highfnum

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Posted 28 September 2022 - 02:46 AM

jupiter same dx8 

Capture 2022-09-28T02_32_35dx8-Delle.jpg


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#9197 Bomber Bob

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Posted 29 September 2022 - 04:50 PM

Ian made his presence felt last night, with NE surface winds @ 16 / gusts 32 knots, so I opted for a short / stubby & relatively heavy old scope -- my 1973 Takahashi TS-65/P (65 x 500 Semi-APO Triplet).  (Bonus:  The high winds grounded all but a few skeeters!)  Skies were the clearest & driest they've been since March.  Saturn & Jupiter were BRIGHT -- the 4 Galileans were brilliant disks, and all pure white, except for yellowish Io.  Moments of calm were very short, so disk details were tough.  Only 1 belt on Saturn, but The Rings looked sharp enough to deli-slice a slab of ham.  4 constant belts on Jupiter, with a 5th / 6th on rare occasions.  Polar regions on both disks were very prominent.  Overall, the turbulence limited the TS-65 to just 125x.

 

M92 appeared near as bright as M13 at 25x.  It was in a lane of near-perfect darkness & clarity, but just a few degrees east, M57 was tough to find at 32x.  Sweeping NNW to SSE was the most rewarding -- M10 & M12 were much easier to spot than usual in this 50-year old TAK.  M15 alternated from meh to Wow! once it got into the steam.  Ditto for the M31 Family.  At their best, the globulars & galaxies took 156x (AT Paradigm 3.2mm) very well.  The TS-65 isn't a true APO, but it's 100% Takahashi...

 

While I prefer my Brandons in the TS for high-power planetary observing, our Sponsor's Paradigm eyepieces are great for DSOs & double-splitting.  The 3.2mm really impressed for contrast & relative brightness at 156x (61x per inch).  VG glass, and solid construction, and I like the "nose" cushion that positions my eye on the center of field.  The stubby & hefty TAK Sky Cancer motorized EQ is a perfect match for the TS-65; and, the 60-year old Eagle surveyor tripod gives it a stable platform.  Yet the rig is light to tote all over the yard.  All that's missing is a Right / Angle Finder...


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#9198 ccwemyss

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Posted 29 September 2022 - 09:24 PM

Comparing the Edmund 4" with the Meade 152 ED. tl/dr: the Meade is brighter. 

 

The forecast until noon was for clear, then it was mostly clear until late afternoon, then partly cloudy. But I decided to deal with the clouds as the forecasts for the next week are mostly cloudy. I used Arcturus to align the Voyager finder and Telrad for the Edmund, then went to Saturn, which was in a thin cloud layer. Both scopes showed Cassini, color variation on the planet, and ring shadow. The Meade brought out extra moons. Jupiter was still low, but at 200x both scopes showed the EBs and some knotting. It was actually a bit easier in the Edmund due to the dimmer view. M81 and M82 were obvious in the Meade, and visible in the Edmund. M13 resolved beautifully in the Meade and was not quite as granular in the Edmund. Alberio looked lovely in both. The double cluster showed more stars in the Meade but was still impressive in the Edmund. The Meade preferred the Panoptic 41 while the Edmund liked the UO 40mm Konig better. M31, 32, and 110 were visible in both, but the Meade showed greater extent, and a bit of dust lane. 

 

The little Voyager made a very nice finder. I didn't have time to collimate the scopes, so I would go to an object in the Meade, and then use the Voyager when it came time to shift to the Edmund. It was easy to see how far off they were, and use the finder to return the object to the Meade's view by moving it the necessary distance along the crosshair that was aligned with the shift direction. 

 

Although the Edmund isn't as bright, it still held its own. And now it should be more usable for observing evenings with my students, once I put it back on the 706 mount. 

 

Chip W. 


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#9199 dave253

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Posted 30 September 2022 - 01:08 AM

I had a look at Jupiter and Saturn through my Vixen 80m, with the 8-24 zoom.

Saturn was crisp, some subtle bands showing, Cassini division and Titan. 
Jupiter also showed subtle belts and colour, and the tiny inky dot of Io transiting. 
 

 

edit; it’s so much fun to watch Jupiter’s moons do their nightly dance! Tonight Io Callisto and Europa were forming a cute little triangle. 


Edited by dave253, 30 September 2022 - 05:18 AM.

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#9200 steve t

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Posted 30 September 2022 - 08:11 AM

Yesterday's solar observation using the 4' Newtonian at 62x showed a fair size spot with a nicely developed penumbra. The umbra appeared to be developing a light bridge across its middle. Overall, I counter four groups and 11 spots. 


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