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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#11126 jgraham

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Posted 03 July 2024 - 01:26 PM

Last night I caught first-light with my new to me 3" f/16 Tasco 10TE. I started at Vega and visited just about every star in Lyra down to about magnitude 6, ending with M57. I then worked my way across Cygnus and on to Vulpecula, ending at M27. The telescope was a joy to use with excellent slow motion controls that were easy to reach while seated at the eyepiece. The scope itself produces a fine image that never gets soft. It runs out of light before it runs out of resolution.

Bonus... I found that my 30mm RACI finder fits the original Tasco finder bracket. My back loves this little mod.

Most excellent.
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#11127 CHASLX200

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Posted 03 July 2024 - 05:59 PM

There is a very reasonably priced 900QMD on AM right now...

 

https://astromart.co...ripod-and-dolly

 

This is an AP classic for sure!

I don't have AM.



#11128 CHASLX200

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Posted 03 July 2024 - 06:00 PM

only $3500.  Chas will need to sell the Vette or rent a van.

Say won't ship and no clue where it is.



#11129 deSitter

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Posted 03 July 2024 - 06:15 PM

Say won't ship and no clue where it is.

Powhatan VA.

 

-drl


Edited by deSitter, 03 July 2024 - 06:15 PM.

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#11130 deSitter

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Posted 03 July 2024 - 06:16 PM

I don't have AM.

It's $15 whole clams. Two coffees at Throwbucks.

 

-drl


Edited by deSitter, 03 July 2024 - 06:17 PM.


#11131 deSitter

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Posted 03 July 2024 - 06:19 PM

Last night I caught first-light with my new to me 3" f/16 Tasco 10TE. I started at Vega and visited just about every star in Lyra down to about magnitude 6, ending with M57. I then worked my way across Cygnus and on to Vulpecula, ending at M27. The telescope was a joy to use with excellent slow motion controls that were easy to reach while seated at the eyepiece. The scope itself produces a fine image that never gets soft. It runs out of light before it runs out of resolution.

Bonus... I found that my 30mm RACI finder fits the original Tasco finder bracket. My back loves this little mod.

Most excellent.

I own 5 AO telescopes and the same applies to them all - who knows how they managed to make perfect lenses over and over again?

 

-drl



#11132 jgraham

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Posted 03 July 2024 - 06:28 PM

I had to pull the objective out to clean a bit of fungus between the elements and I was really impressed with the workmanship. There were also some very neat, clearly written notations written in pencil on the edge of the blanks. Gorgeous work.

#11133 starman876

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Posted 04 July 2024 - 08:57 AM

Say won't ship and no clue where it is.

Powhatan, VA - is near Richmond VA about  1.5 hours from me.     You do know these mounts only have slow motion only through the hand control.  


Edited by starman876, 04 July 2024 - 08:57 AM.


#11134 Terra Nova

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Posted 04 July 2024 - 09:05 AM

Go for it Chas! Jump! :jump:



#11135 CHASLX200

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Posted 04 July 2024 - 09:25 AM

Powhatan, VA - is near Richmond VA about  1.5 hours from me.     You do know these mounts only have slow motion only through the hand control.  

I know. Really don't need em if the mount is butter smooth to hand center planets at 450x like my AP800 was.



#11136 clamchip

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Posted 04 July 2024 - 10:37 AM

I did some direct comparison between my Jaegers/Lomo 6 inch f/14 Mak and my E. Popp 6 inch f/16 Mak.

There's a big difference in how long it takes before they are ready for observing. About 15 minutes and

the Lomo is performing well, at least an hour for the Popp. In the eyepiece they are practically the same.

Another big difference between these two is in the primary area. Lomo primary is a zero expansion

ceramic, conical shape, and supported at it's perforation only. The Popp is a full thickness low-expansion Schott glass incased in a aluminum cell. More than likely this is the reason the Lomo is ready for observing so quickly. Something to remember when shopping for a MCT I suppose.

Robert

 

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Edited by clamchip, 04 July 2024 - 10:57 AM.

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#11137 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 05 July 2024 - 12:15 PM

After what seems an erternity of clouds and rain, the sky cleared last night, for a while, anyway. When I went out at 11 PM, the sky was just getting dark and the brighter stars were out. I had my trusty Zeiss 7x50 binos in hand and took a seat in the back yard facing south. The sky was turbulent but very transparent. So I found a bunch of targets quite easily. M8 just jumped out at me, m20 visible. M24 was huge and bright. M22 was easy but m28 invisible. M4 was just a faint patch. M6 and m7 were what I was really after, but they eluded me until about midnight, when the sky was darker.

Where I live, there is almost always a band of haze 10-15° high along the southern horizon. This makes finding M6, m7 and the globulars in Sagittarius almost impossible. So I was very pleased the catch some of them in a clear deep twilight sky.

Edited by Paul Sweeney, 05 July 2024 - 12:16 PM.

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#11138 deSitter

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Posted 05 July 2024 - 12:50 PM

After what seems an erternity of clouds and rain, the sky cleared last night, for a while, anyway. When I went out at 11 PM, the sky was just getting dark and the brighter stars were out. I had my trusty Zeiss 7x50 binos in hand and took a seat in the back yard facing south. The sky was turbulent but very transparent. So I found a bunch of targets quite easily. M8 just jumped out at me, m20 visible. M24 was huge and bright. M22 was easy but m28 invisible. M4 was just a faint patch. M6 and m7 were what I was really after, but they eluded me until about midnight, when the sky was darker.

Where I live, there is almost always a band of haze 10-15° high along the southern horizon. This makes finding M6, m7 and the globulars in Sagittarius almost impossible. So I was very pleased the catch some of them in a clear deep twilight sky.

Wow, I'm surprised you can see those objects in Sagittarius from that far north!

 

-drl



#11139 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 05 July 2024 - 01:50 PM

They just clear the horizon, so I don't get to see them very often!

#11140 ccwemyss

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Posted 07 July 2024 - 10:34 PM

Some breaks in the clouds tonight (but not the clouds of mosquitos). First light for the Jaegers 110mm f4.5. Star test with a 5mm shows some overcorrection. But still quite sharp at low powers. Did a quick sweep of the milky way through Cygnus, picking up a planetary and Alberio, then down near Sagittarius, catching a globular and several open clusters. No time to really stop and identify anything -- swatting bugs, and humidity starting to condense on everything. Just a very interesting experience to move along through star fields, finding interesting objects, without even trying. 

 

Bringing it in, I tilted the tripod back a bit to go through the door, and the mount swung down onto my hand. Then, as I was trying to reach over with my other hand to lift it up, the GSO focuser decided to spool out suddenly. That impulse of energy then caused the WO saddle to let go of the rail, and the whole scope slid out, crashing onto the floor. The impact caused the PVC cell to separate (it's only held on by about four threads, and the female threads are shallow, to provide enough radius for the lens to slip in) and bounce a couple of feet.

 

After some not-so-choice words, I gathered up the pieces. The objective was still in the PVC ring, and it screwed back together. The diagonal didn't seem to have suffered. So all's well. But it was a heart-stopping moment, and now I'll be adding some screws to the cell to lock it in place, as well as some safety stops on the rail.

 

That will all have to wait, as I'm getting some surgery in the morning, and won't be doing any lifting for a few weeks. 

 

Chip W. 


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#11141 deSitter

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Posted 08 July 2024 - 06:35 AM

Some breaks in the clouds tonight (but not the clouds of mosquitos). First light for the Jaegers 110mm f4.5. Star test with a 5mm shows some overcorrection. But still quite sharp at low powers. Did a quick sweep of the milky way through Cygnus, picking up a planetary and Alberio, then down near Sagittarius, catching a globular and several open clusters. No time to really stop and identify anything -- swatting bugs, and humidity starting to condense on everything. Just a very interesting experience to move along through star fields, finding interesting objects, without even trying. 

 

Bringing it in, I tilted the tripod back a bit to go through the door, and the mount swung down onto my hand. Then, as I was trying to reach over with my other hand to lift it up, the GSO focuser decided to spool out suddenly. That impulse of energy then caused the WO saddle to let go of the rail, and the whole scope slid out, crashing onto the floor. The impact caused the PVC cell to separate (it's only held on by about four threads, and the female threads are shallow, to provide enough radius for the lens to slip in) and bounce a couple of feet.

 

After some not-so-choice words, I gathered up the pieces. The objective was still in the PVC ring, and it screwed back together. The diagonal didn't seem to have suffered. So all's well. But it was a heart-stopping moment, and now I'll be adding some screws to the cell to lock it in place, as well as some safety stops on the rail.

 

That will all have to wait, as I'm getting some surgery in the morning, and won't be doing any lifting for a few weeks. 

 

Chip W. 

Oh man! Good luck on your operation - Dr. Chip did a good job on that telescope so that's a good omen :)

 

Such stories are why I never move the scope and mount as a unit. Even with 3" refractors the mount and scope are treated separately.

 

-drl



#11142 jgraham

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Posted 08 July 2024 - 09:10 AM

I was keeping a close eye on the sky last night hoping that it would clear. The forecast looked good, but the clouds were being stubborn. As dusk deepened we started to get some breaks with very clear air in the gaps and I was treated to an incredible crescent moon very low in the west. I just had to take a peek and after pondering what I could set out quickly I grabbed my shiny new 3" f/16 1959ish Tasco 10TE fitted with a Meade 20mm RG wide field eyepiece. The view was amazing! Being a refractor the scope acclimated quickly, giving a sharp, high contrast image. The crescent was so thin there was no sign of the eastern edge of Mare Crisium. The view all along the crescent was just wonderful accompanied by the soft glow of Earthshine. I watched the show until the moon slipped into the trees.

This is a great example of how after 62 years The Magic is still there! Seeing it through a 65 year old classic was a bonus. 😀

Enjoy!
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#11143 jgraham

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Posted 13 July 2024 - 10:26 PM

Wow! That was fast! I used my shiny new Tasco 10TE  to observe the occulation of Spica by the moon. It never fails to amaze me just how fast a star winks out behind the moon. The brilliance of Spica made it that much neater. The only show better is when a binary star gets occulted, then it's wink-wink!

 

Most excellent!


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#11144 deSitter

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Posted 13 July 2024 - 10:40 PM

Wow! That was fast! I used my shiny new Tasco 10TE  to observe the occulation of Spica by the moon. It never fails to amaze me just how fast a star winks out behind the moon. The brilliance of Spica made it that much neater. The only show better is when a binary star gets occulted, then it's wink-wink!

 

Most excellent!

The coolest occo I ever saw was a couple of years ago - Arcturus. It is so big that it took a finite and detectable time - about 1/10th second - to vanish. I could definitely tell it was not instantaneous.

 

I missed the occo tonight because of trees. Oh well.

 

-drl



#11145 Bungee

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Posted 13 July 2024 - 10:57 PM

The Unitron got the call tonight. Watched Spica disappear at 70X. Never saw one through a scope before, good thing I didn't blink.


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#11146 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 July 2024 - 05:43 AM

Mars and Jup in the 8" SCT. Like looking at boiling eggs the seeing was a 5 and they are still too low.  Mars shows some detail on a small disk at 450x.


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#11147 deSitter

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Posted 14 July 2024 - 06:45 AM

Mars and Jup in the 8" SCT. Like looking at boiling eggs the seeing was a 5 and they are still too low.  Mars shows some detail on a small disk at 450x.

Mars still only 5.6" seconds of arc in diameter - so it couldn't have been THAT bad :) That's only 3x Ganymede!

 

-drl


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#11148 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 July 2024 - 06:52 AM

Mars still only 5.6" seconds of arc in diameter - so it couldn't have been THAT bad smile.gif That's only 3x Ganymede!

 

-drl

Bad to me. You know how picky i am on seeing, optics and mounts.  This 8" Meade SCT is a real cut above. 2 more weeks for Jup.



#11149 starman876

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Posted 14 July 2024 - 09:48 AM

Been to hot and muggy  around here for anything except staying in the AC.  Looking at the night sky I am lucky to only see the brightest stars.  It has been sad.  Perfect weather for putting a scope together. 



#11150 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 July 2024 - 09:55 AM

Been to hot and muggy  around here for anything except staying in the AC.  Looking at the night sky I am lucky to only see the brightest stars.  It has been sad.  Perfect weather for putting a scope together. 

I have lost a mag in the last year for some reason. It was a low of 84f here Fri with a bone crushing dew point of 80f. Talk about walking outside thinking you stepped on Venus.




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