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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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11154 replies to this topic

#11151 Garyth64

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Posted 14 July 2024 - 11:41 AM

Wow! That was fast! I used my shiny new Tasco 10TE  to observe the occulation of Spica by the moon. It never fails to amaze me just how fast a star winks out behind the moon. The brilliance of Spica made it that much neater. The only show better is when a binary star gets occulted, then it's wink-wink!

 

Most excellent!

We had many of our club members at our monthly observing night, and most of us saw Spica wink out.  It was an excellent evening.

 

I had my newly acquired 1959 Criterion 6" f/9 there for viewing.  It was the first time I looked thru it.  Fantastic optics!


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#11152 Bungee

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Posted 14 July 2024 - 10:51 PM

I planted my Unitron on a Vixen mount and have been fine tuning it. Spent this evening bouncing around a few doubles. I think Albireo is my new favorite target, the color contrast is mesmerizing. The Moon is beautiful through this scope, no false color and pinpoint detail. 

 

If I haven't said it before; I thank all you classic experts for freely sharing your knowledge. The information I've gleaned here has steered me to focus on specific scopes, all of which produce excellent views. I'm very content now with what I possess and have shifted to improving my mounts.


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#11153 Roger Belveal

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Posted 15 July 2024 - 08:30 PM

I woke up 3:15 this morning and couldn't go back to sleep. So I decided to get a head start on the planet viewing season. I used my handy grab-n-go Comet Catcher first on Saturn as it was the highest in the sky. I'm not a huge fan of the ring position, but I'm getting to see Saturn for the first time in a while, so it's all good. For a wide field scope this little orange jewel performed very well indeed. Next came Jupiter, which was pretty low in the horizon. Not too shabby! Mars was not an option at this point. All in all a nice early morning look see...
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#11154 deSitter

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Posted 15 July 2024 - 08:50 PM

I woke up 3:15 this morning and couldn't go back to sleep. So I decided to get a head start on the planet viewing season. I used my handy grab-n-go Comet Catcher first on Saturn as it was the highest in the sky. I'm not a huge fan of the ring position, but I'm getting to see Saturn for the first time in a while, so it's all good. For a wide field scope this little orange jewel performed very well indeed. Next came Jupiter, which was pretty low in the horizon. Not too shabby! Mars was not an option at this point. All in all a nice early morning look see...

Mars is like 5.6" seconds of arc! :) Sometimes I like to see how small a disk I can see at say 40x. At this power Mars is 5.6x40 = 224 seconds of arc = almost 4' minutes of arc. That's 1/8th of the diameter of the Moon. So, about like Mare Serentatis. Maybe a little smaller. I can easily see that. Certainly larger than Mare Crisium.

 

-drl


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#11155 oldmanastro

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Posted Yesterday, 10:22 PM

After many weeks of either dusty haze or rain or both yesterday the night was cloudless and clear. I took out the Carton 100mm f/13 refractor. At first I went straight toward the moon. Copernicus was just at the right distance from the terminator providing some of the best high contrast views that I have seen of this crater. The terraced walls were very detailed even at 288x using the SvB wide field eyepiece and a 2X Barlow. I decided to take an image but even then the visual view was more detailed. The views of Plato and Clavius were just as detailed and crisp. I imaged those two with the ZWOASI224 and a 2x Barlow. The images compare well with the view through the 9mm + Barlow combination but as I said before the visual view was better.With a diameter of 144 miles, Clavius could easily fit this island within its walls. After the moon Antares was the next target. I was able to see the greenish companion at about 200x as a tiny green dot just outside the diffraction ring around the star. Epsilon Bootes was a beautiful sight at 200x with the bright blue secondary sitting on the outskirts of the diffraction rind of the primary.  I went on a hunting trip to the Sagittarius-Scorpius region with the first target being NGC6441 my very old friend from the 60s. It was the first NGC I ever observed and to be honest at that time, summer of1966, I thought it was a comet. M6 and 7 were great with the 20mm wide field SvB eyepiece (65x). I continued the low power DSO tour without even using the drive motor. The next objects were M69 and 54, both small globular clusters especially M54. These were followed by M22 with some stars resolved in the periphery. M8 and NGC6530 provided a beautiful view followed by M20 and 21. M24 was a more sparse looking open cluster followed by the more compact M25 and M23. I have notes from 1966 when I observed most of these clusters with my 60mm f/11 Sears (Towa) refractor (now called a hobby killer...yeah right). The session was culminated with Albireo. It was high in the sky and I had to do some contortions to see it. This is a long telescope. I can't imagine a 4" f/16 Unitron. As usual the classic Carton lenses provided excellent performance and really minimal CA. The other refractor of the same aperture that can equal this performance is the Celestron C102 (Clammy) with the CA as well controlled as that of the Carton. In the end the classic long focus refractor can do quite a good job on DSOs. No wonder John Mallas chose a 4" f/16 Unitron for his extensive sky survey during the 50s and 60s.

 

Here are the three lunar images of Plato, Clavius and Copernicus.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Clavius2024-7-16-0159-100mmCarton2x (2).jpg
  • Plato2024-7-16-0201-100mmCarton2x (2).jpg
  • Copernicus2024-7-16-0153-100mmCarton2x.jpg

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