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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#126 Terra Nova

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 08:49 PM

Clouds rolled in here yesterday and haven't left. It poured down rain tonight. I think things shall improve for tomorrow night. 



#127 bremms

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 09:30 PM

Just got in from looking a Jupiter from the front porch.  My 5.5" Maksutov mirror came back from coating this afternoon. ))) Got it all buttoned up and it didn't fail to impress. Showed a little more detail and it was a little brighter than the 4" Jaegers. Scattering is reduced as well. Pick between them?? No. Jupiter looked good in both. seeing about 4-5/10.


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#128 davidmcgo

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:24 AM

I had a decent evening with my 1965 Celestron 10 and a central meridian transit of the great Red Spot on Jupiter.  Seeing wasn't the best but I had some pretty nice views between my 17mm and 13mm TV smooth side Plossls.  The GRS was actually a nice red color instead of the peach, salmon, or beige tones form years past, and there's a good amount of churn following it in the SEB.  Seeing to the south wasn't very good so Sirius B wasn't really convincing although I did see it the previous night with my AP130EDT.

 

The view wasn't as sharp as with my actively cooled 8" f6 Newtonian, but the added aperture brings out more intense color.  Plus the C10 tracks and is a perfect sitting height.  I was also playing around with a shorter setup off the rear cell for fine focusing, which is a Borg #7315 non rotating 1.25" helical focuser screwed into the eyepiece end of a Baader 34mm T2 prism diagonal.  This got me back around design back focus and was a bit better balanced than with the Feathertouch 2015BCR I usually use on the back.  The little Borg focuser is nice but seems a little tight in spots, I bought it several years ago and hadn't used it so it may need a clean and re-grease.  My C10 is 1965 production (serial number 71) and predates the 3 spindle focuser and has a fair amount of image shift when reversing the focuser direction so the added focuser on the back helps.  With parfocal eyepieces, the little Borg on the Baader prism is really nice.  I also have the #4317 which rotates but adds extra travel but that lives in my Coulter CT-100 so I can use eyepieces other than the crappy 27mm binocular Kellner that came with it.

 

Dave


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#129 bremms

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:28 AM

Newly refurbished said Maksutov.   Fresh mirror coat, Primary only as the secondary is glued in the cell and i don't want to risk damage. painted and flocked inside. Mirror cell picture is before coating.

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#130 Terra Nova

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:50 AM

Great looking Mak! It looks heavy for its size? What does it weigh?



#131 Terra Nova

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:54 AM

Dave, Baader makes a helical focus click lock for that prism. It is extremely smooth and accurate throughout it's range and has a compression ring at the eyepiece end. You can pick one up from Alpine Astro. It is a great way of adding fine focus. I got it for my Zeiss scopes but I sometimes use the setup on my 6" SCT.

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Edited by terraclarke, 25 March 2016 - 09:57 AM.

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#132 DMala

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 10:46 AM

Dave, Baader makes a helical focus click lock for that prism. It is extremely smooth and accurate throughout it's range and has a compression ring at the eyepiece end. You can pick one up from Alpine Astro. It is a great way of adding fine focus. I got it for my Zeiss scopes but I sometimes use the setup on my 6" SCT.

 

Same opinion here. The price is excellent for the quality IMO. I plan to buy another so I do not have to move it around as much!



#133 steve t

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 11:24 AM

Hi All,
I don't know if this counts, but last night I did some quick, hand held, observing with my new to me University Optics 8x50 raci finder that I purchased off CN classifieds (thanks again Teddy). Although the sky was hazy I was able to observe the Orion nebula, Orion's belt (to estimate the FoV), and the Pleiades.
I'd estimate it to be late 80's or early 90's vintage and, to me, it looks like it may have been made by Nihon Seiko (sp?). In general this little finder provides very nice images over its 4.5 degree FoV.
This afternoon I'll get it mounted on my 1981 homebuilt 6" Newtonian.
Regards
Steve T
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#134 davidmcgo

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 12:52 PM

Dave, Baader makes a helical focus click lock for that prism. It is extremely smooth and accurate throughout it's range and has a compression ring at the eyepiece end. You can pick one up from Alpine Astro. It is a great way of adding fine focus. I got it for my Zeiss scopes but I sometimes use the setup on my 6" SCT.

I have one of those too, but the travel is very short (5mm or so) and the overall housing isn't long enough for some eyepieces with a longer barrel to seat fully in (Nagler Zooms for example, not that I use those on the C10) .  The Borg rotating 4317 has 15mm or more, and the non rotating 7315 is 10mm or so.  The non rotating is nice with the old style batwing Teve Vue eyeguards.

 

Dave


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#135 bremms

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 03:12 PM

Great looking Mak! It looks heavy for its size? What does it weigh?

Not really that heavy. The front cell and corrector are a little heavy.  The scope is 8-10 lbs. It's really pretty light.



#136 Vesper818

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 04:07 PM

I moved that over to !what did you do to your scope?" Thread. Although I did observe what came in the boxes.

#137 glennbech

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 06:37 PM

As mentioned in another thread I took apart and cleaned the air spaced doublet of my Circle K Weltblick 60/910 today. With great help and encouragement CN users I must say!

 

We have strange weather today, a thick fog rolled in, but at a lower altitude than mine. So I have no fog, but a moon washed sky that should not permit much more than double stars, Jupiter and Moon observations.

 

Eager to test the Weltblick after cleaning I found the double cluster. It was quite fascinating to see the nebulosity of unresolved stars. I usually observe with a 90mm Megrez 90 that resolve more. My 20mm Zeiss Ortho famed both clusters and gave a lovely view of pinpoint stars. 

 

Just for fun I pointed at Eta Hercules and moved south-east. And what a reward. A faint blob came into the FOV, there was no doubt that I had identified M13.  In the bag! (I reset my Messier list 1.1.2016)


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#138 TSSClay

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:11 PM

I just got in from a couple of hours playing with the RKMT4.2".  I checked the collimation and fussed with it a bit.  I have to say that I am tickled pink with the scope's performance.  I don't know if it will ever be a high power platform but low to mid powers are great with this thing. 

 

I started with Jupiter and using a 16mm UO Konig I could see a fair bit of "texture" at the poles, the GRS was at the "left" edge of the planet, the NEB and SEB had "ragged" edges with dark irregular markings.  No objectionable CA - just a bit of violet on the edge that I could barely see. The Konig worked so well that I dug out my Denks - which have not been out for YEARS.  That was a great experience.  Using two eyes was a lot better on Jupiter.  Now I will have to get some more pairs of eyepieces other than the Orion 15mm's that I have for the binos.  Oh well - NEAF is coming.

 

After Jupiter I went to M42 and spent some time looking at the area at low power and up to 240X.  Stars were sharp even though the sky was unstable - transparency was good and the winter Milky Way was nicely visible over head.  I swung over to the double cluster which just fit in my 28mm RKE.  Beautiful stars with nice color - the yellow stars jumped right out.  Last object was M45 - a little large to fit the FOV - I did not try a 40mm although I should have.  The FOV of my 28mm RKE and my 2" 32mm Konig was just about the same.

 

Before I tarped it back up I Sighted the polar axis and found that my guess when I set the mount up was off by several degrees.  It was a simple matter to adjust the mount right then.

 

All in all a very fun night!

 

Clay


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#139 kansas skies

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:57 PM

Due to recent health problems, my scopes have been collecting dust for a couple of months. What's more, it looks like they're probably going to be sitting unused for quite a while longer. Still, we had what appeared to be amazingly clear skies last night, especially considering the prairie fires we've been experiencing around here as of late. Jupiter was calling my name, so I had to figure out how to get in at least a little viewing time.

 

I got to thinking that my late 60's 114 Unitron shouldn't take too much effort to set up for a quick look. I'm missing the visual back for the scope, but I read somewhere that the visual back from a C8 would thread right in and provide 1.25" capabilities. Sure enough, it worked like a charm and I was able to set the scope up with very little difficulty. That diminutive scope never fails to deliver. When equipped with my 6.7mm Meade Series 3000 Plossl, the GRS stood out in stark contrast and the equatorial belts were awash with apparent detail. I bumped the magnification up by using a 2x barlow with a 9mm Ortho. The detail held, but the image did soften slightly. For my part, I found the high magnification pretty much unusable due to floaters.

 

Before packing it in, I turned the scope toward Orion for a quick look at the Trapezium. With a 9mm Ortho, it showed four beautiful pinpoint stars. I did get the distinct impression that the E component was trying to break through, but I didn't have time to really try to coax it out. I'll save that as a challenge for another day. Finally, a quick look at Rigel and Polaris revealed the tiny pinpoint companions of both. All in all, it was a great night with a great little scope.

 

Bill


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#140 Terra Nova

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 11:22 AM

Sorry to hear about your recent health problems Bill, but is sounds like you are on the mend. I'm glad to hear that your little #114 is aiding in the healing process. Unitrons are great medicine for what ails us! I often extoll the virtues of a good 60mm telescope. They are so easy to set up and use, and the alt-az models, even more so! I know they will be the last of my scopes to go. I plan on using them for a long time. The same can be said for the little 114mm (4.5") F8 Newtonians.

 

I had my Celestron by Vixen black tube C4.5 out last night for a couple of hours watching Jupiter and some of the spring sky open clusters and doubles. What a great little scope. I replaced the 'tube crusher' rings that were original to it with a set of hinged rings, a vixen-style rail, and a carry strap across the top of the rings. I was using it with my Vixen Polaris mount that has an ADM Vixen saddle. It was great fun. I was having such a good time with it that I was wondering how my rebuilt Meade would stack up so I got it out as well. The Meade is an old black Polaris model. I got the OTA for a few bucks at a thrift store a few years ago and rebuilt it. It has a larger tube than the C4.5. I flocked it and replaced the optics with an 1/8 wave parabolic mirror and larger 1/8 wave elliptical flat. I brought it up to the deck and set it up on the Porta Mount. I generally use a set of Orion Expanse eyepieces with that scope. It is my de-facto grap and go Newt. I had never used them both at the same time. Both gave great views of Jupe! I really couldn't see any significant difference between the two actually. The seeing was such that the highest useful magnification was with a 6mm eyepiece (about 150X). It as a little chillier than it has been lately, upper 30s. But it was still nice to be out.


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#141 michael h

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 01:00 AM

Just spent two hours with Jupiter and my 1974 Cave 8" F/8.  Even with my old eyes Jupiter was very nice.  The better half gave up on me and went to bed.  Can't blame her.  :)

 

Mike H


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#142 davidmcgo

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 10:38 AM

I popped outside at 0520 this morning when my wife had to get up for work, and magically it was clear and not fogged over, so I had a nice hour or so with my 1975 C8, a University Optics 10.2mm Professional Series orthoscopic, Mars, Saturn, and the waning gibbous Moon.

 

I had it out yesterday evening for Jupiter and the GRS coming onto the disk before it dewed up and I took it in for the night, so it was dry but needed to cool down again.

 

Seeing was decent, not perfect but 200x was usable.  Mars had its mostly blank "poker face" towards us, but still saw south polar hood and Mare Sirenum near it, and a possible dust storm or bright cloud over Tharsis.

 

Saturn looked majestic with the Crepe Ring and Cassini's Division and some banding on the globe all nicely defined.

 

On the Moon, it's a nice treat to see opposite lighting on Tranquilitaus, Thephilus, Cyrillus, and all my other favorites from the evening views.

 

Not a bad little romp through the Solar System to start my day!

 

Dave


Edited by davidmcgo, 27 March 2016 - 01:06 PM.

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#143 AllanDystrup

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 01:35 PM

JUPITER-26.03.2016-B.png


Edited by AllanDystrup, 28 March 2016 - 01:42 PM.

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#144 Bomber Bob

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 05:40 PM

In my Sergeant Schultz accent, "Mein Telementor 2 ist hier und bereit für die Sterne zu testen heute Abend - Y'all!"

 

Jupiter (of course), my winter open cluster tour, and select double stars in Auriga, Gemini, & (I mean, und) Leo.  Cold front will help the DSOs, but may rock Jove a bit too much!


Edited by Bomber Bob, 28 March 2016 - 05:42 PM.

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#145 Chuck Hards

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 06:11 PM

JW, I'll believe you have a T2 when I see a picture of it in front of the shed doors.  ;)


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#146 Bomber Bob

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 06:14 PM

Okay, just for you Chuck - here's the first Official T2 mugshot:

 

T2 - First Setup S01.jpg


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#147 Chuck Hards

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 06:39 PM

NOW it's official! 

 

It's a beauty,  JW!


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#148 Terra Nova

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 07:02 PM

Congratulations and welcome to Club Z! ;)


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#149 Bomber Bob

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 07:16 PM

Cue the Bee Gees:  You should be dancing... Yeah! 


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#150 Bomber Bob

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 08:45 PM

Briefly, T2 does more with less than any other 60mm refractor I've ever used.  On Jupiter, T2 @ 70x showed finer belt detail than the SS151 @ 100x.  Same number of belts in both scopes, but less within belt contrast in the 151.  But, the T2 has slight blue fringing on the limb, while the 151 is CA free on & off axis.

 

Both scopes give textbook Airy disks.

 

Gamma Leonis:  Again, T2 makes a clean - VERY clean - split at lower power than the 151.  Less orange in the 151, which concurs with both my Questar & Tinsley.

 

Some quick sweeping at 28x with the funky KE30, and I'm smitten.  Awesome contrast - even the dimmer stars pop.  But, the mount has even less friction than the Edmund.  IOW:  BALANCE is critical.  It swung down and boinked my temple - nearly saw stars with my eyes closed.


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