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What did you observe with your classic telescope today ?

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#151 figurate

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 11:18 PM

Those Zeiss lenses do have fantastic contrast, don't they? You should have lots of good times with that rig. I made a stealthy entrance into Club Z a while ago, using a back entrance while the bouncer was momentarily distracted by a stubborn retaining ring, but I haven't yet had the opportunity to use my own pristine-looking Telementor lens in a scope; it is intended to ride on my Carl Z 10" f6 someday (I'm in no real hurry to get that all built out) for a total Z-maxout experience eventually. They will compliment each other well.

 

I also have had some great views lately using my Brandt 8" f/15 Mak, which is finally some payback after the considerable work I put into it. It gives a definitive view of M37 at 125x, and despite some bumpy seeing tonight, the detail briefly visible on Jupiter exceeds my expectations. Really impressive performer, but I had to work for every bit of it (one critical thing turned out to be that the focuser needed quite a lot of shimming, and I had originally checked it with an inferior laser collimator). It's like a happy compromise between my two favorite types: color purity similar to a newtonian, and effortless resolution like that of a refractor. I am looking forward to pointing it at a globular or two this spring. Outdoes my very decent 8" newt by virtue of better wavefront accuracy, but definitely not a RFT, though.     

 

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Edited by figurate, 29 March 2016 - 01:14 AM.

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#152 Terra Nova

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 12:48 PM

Today, I observed the classic sun with a classic scope! 

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#153 Terra Nova

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 12:49 PM

and I also observed the classic sun in classic H-alpha!

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Edited by terraclarke, 29 March 2016 - 12:49 PM.

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#154 photiost

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 12:53 PM

  :like:


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#155 AllanDystrup

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 02:42 PM

Same as Terra, -- the sun in white light (well, Baader solar continuum),

with my FL-80S and Zeiss/Baader 2" Herschel wedge. Outstanding contrast

in umbra and penumbra of AR2526, and very fine granulation!

 

Also "first light" for my CZJ 1b parallactic mount-- it handles the weight of my

3" and 4" refractors slightly better than the CZJ TM, but I miss the fine control in RA.

That said, it tracks very precisely in RA, and the motor sound is a faint wisper

after I cleaned & relubed it and put a strip of felt at the edge of the motor lid.

 

 

FL80-Sun-290316.jpg

 

Allan


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#156 Bomber Bob

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 09:23 PM

Brunnmentor started showing the preceding notch in the belt around 1950 local @ 140x.  I confirmed it @ 210x.  By 2020 the GRS was away from the limb.  After 2030, I stepped down the power, and could still see it @ 47x.  

 

Used the KE30 @ 28x for some sweeping from Perseus to Orion.  Trapezium was tight, bright, & 4 stars perfectly resolved.  Gotta get this scope out to the country!


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#157 Terra Nova

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 10:12 PM

Wonderful views of Jupiter tonight! Going old school with the T1, vintage 0.965 Takahashi click-lock and vintage 25mm H, 16mm, 10mm, and 6mm CZJ orthos. I never like to push it over 140X which was so crisp and beautifully sharp. I could make out 6 belts, with thickening and thinning in the two main equatorial belts. The GRS, and was near the edge but still all completely within the visible disk of the planet. The four moons were all showing nice, discernable disks of slightly differeng diameters and brightness/color- Io, quite close to the planet, showing a very noticable orange cast. This scope never ceases to amaze me! It is so sharp! The contrast is wonderful, and the color rendition is just beautiful, with only the slightest hint of purple, barely detectable, mainly with averted vision. I have seen more in ED scopes. I have to remind myself that I am not looking through an apo, and a similar reminder is necessary about the 63mm objective. You would swear you were looking through a larger scope. The helical focuser is a joy to use! It is so easily fine-tuned to the sharpest focus. The mount as well is wonderful, so robust and jiggle-free with such smooth tracking. The air was stable, trnasparency was pretty good, magnitude 4 stars were visible naked-eye, and the temperature was in the 40s. All in all, it was a very nice night to be outside for a couple of hours. The halfwit neighbors two houses down of course had their unshielded porchlight blaring, but I set up my old home movie projection screen and it blocked their obnoxious lights.

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#158 Piggyback

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 02:00 AM

Wonderful views of Jupiter tonight! Going old school with the T1, vintage 0.965 Takahashi click-lock and vintage 25mm H, 16mm, 10mm, and 6mm CZJ orthos. I never like to push it over 140X which was so crisp and beautifully sharp. I could make out 6 belts, with thickening and thinning in the two main equatorial belts. The GRS, and was near the edge but still all completely within the visible disk of the planet. The four moons were all showing nice, discernable disks of slightly differeng diameters and brightness/color- Io, quite close to the planet, showing a very noticable orange cast. This scope never ceases to amaze me! It is so sharp! The contrast is wonderful, and the color rendition is just beautiful, with only the slightest hint of purple, barely detectable, mainly with averted vision. I have seen more in ED scopes. I have to remind myself that I am not looking through an apo, and a similar reminder is necessary about the 63mm objective. You would swear you were looking through a larger scope. The helical focuser is a joy to use! It is so easily fine-tuned to the sharpest focus. The mount as well is wonderful, so robust and jiggle-free with such smooth tracking. The air was stable, trnasparency was pretty good, magnitude 4 stars were visible naked-eye, and the temperature was in the 40s. All in all, it was a very nice night to be outside for a couple of hours. The halfwit neighbors two houses down of course had their unshielded porchlight blaring, but I set up my old home movie projection screen and it blocked their obnoxious lights

 

 

 

Mouthwatering report and great idea, Terra. If your halfwit neighbors don't cooperate, run the old "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" on your home movie screen. It will A: Make them switch off porch light for an unforgettable movie experience or B: They call the police. In latter case you could invite said neighbors and officers on your deck for an unforgettable view of Jupiter. Case closed. Friendship and harmony will rule.


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#159 Bomber Bob

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 04:59 AM

I have to remind myself that I am not looking through an apo, and a similar reminder is necessary about the 63mm objective. You would swear you were looking through a larger scope. 

 

Before using my T2, I was a bit skeptical of the Jupiter sketches posted by Telementor owners.  Not any more.  Two consecutive nights of incredible views.  Will set up the Edmund 4" this weekend for comparisons at the same magnification.

 

Terra, I also found 140x to be the sweet spot.

 

The mount is so vibration-free that I don't use the slo-mo to track.  I just gently press my thumb against the tube, and don't disturb the views.


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#160 DMala

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:02 PM

I know I should just stay quiet while you guys display these beautiful scopes and mounts.... but I could not resist and while I am working at better solutions,  I took out the Meade 320 with the skimpy tripod.... The objective for this evening was to verify if thanks to the nice focuser with very long travel, I could use the camera mount from Telescope Warehouse with the removable attachment designed to hold a 1.25" eyepiece in it. It turns out that the Meade 320 has plenty of focusing range, and I was able to use a Meade OR 9mm inside the camera adapter.  A bit of breeze and the crappy tripod did not help but still I got some decent results. This is an unprocessed image, and the raw file is even a little bit better. I also have a video that I will try to stack.

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Edited by DMala, 30 March 2016 - 10:27 PM.

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#161 AllanDystrup

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 01:03 AM

Jupiter last night, through my FL-80S (using a simple webcam).

North is up, West to the right.

 

GRS at the W (p) edge. IO can be glimpsed at the lower right.

Festoons in NEB and turbulence in SEB, E of GRS, are obvious.

The temperate bands plus the polar regions are also seen.

 

Jupiter-2016.03.31-21.30-2.png

 

The transparency was good, but seeing below medium, due to

the jetstream. The image corresponds to the visual impression,

in the rare moments of good seeing, -- quite a deal softer

most of the time.

 

Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 01 April 2016 - 01:20 AM.

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#162 combatdad

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 07:48 AM

Quite impressive Allan!  Jupiter is really putting on a show these days!! 

 

Dave


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#163 DMala

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 03:18 PM

Allan your work is always not only technically excellent but also with a special artistic touch, as usual. I love the "eyepiece view" effect!

 

If you stacked the image, would you be available to post a sample raw frame for my reference to what a good raw frame should look to get an excellent processed image? Also in such case, how did you process it? Just a brief summary of number of frames stacked, program used, etc. Ignore this if you don't have the time. Thanks


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#164 AllanDystrup

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 02:57 AM

OK DMala, here's the data:

 

But first a disclaimer:
as you know, I primarily observe visually, and only occasionally use my webcam to see what I am able to extract of extra information from an image. Up till now I've only done imaging of the sun, and so this is my very first platetary image. Please take my parameter setup "cum granum salis"...  I will have to twist the dials to get better results in the future.

 

OTA was Vixen FL-80S on Zeiss Ib/2V, with backend Baader FFC + ASI120MC camera. Magnification approx. 90x

Recording: FireCapture  -> 63s .avi, 15 fps, gain 75, gamma 39 : https://youtu.be/y04buceRiDw

Here's one raw recorded image frame (cropping done in PSP : Paint Shop Pro)

 

                                      N

          JUP-01.png P

 

Postprocessing: AutoStakkert: Planet, Gradient & Local, Auto size, 10% stacking.
The image sharpened by AutoStakkert (shown in my post above) has somewhat too much contrast to present a realistic picture of Jupiter's atmosphere as observed visually, but it does highlight details, that can only be glimpsed momentarily at "sweet spots" in a mediocre flickering seeing.

 

Here's another postprocessing, -- slightly more gentle settings (and thus more faithful to the visual impression...)

 

                                      N

          Jupiter.png P

 

Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 02 April 2016 - 06:07 AM.

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#165 Astrojensen

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 04:08 AM

I had my Zeiss Telemator and my 6" f/8 newtonian out looking at shadow transits on Jupiter. Io and Europa were passing in front of the disk during the evening, real prime-time viewing. Unfortunately, the seeing was poor most of the evening, compounded by a heavy haze, which severely dimmed Jupiter. 

 

To make the tiny shadows easier to see, I used approximately 160x on the 6" and ~110x on the Telemator. 160x was pushing it severely, but occasionally the seeing would improve and details would pop out. I used the same binoviewer with barlow on both telescopes. The barlow gives approximately 3.25x and I used a pair of 25mm Zeiss eyepieces. Telescope magnifications are rounded off for convenience. I should measure them accurately one day, but I haven't gotten around to do it. 

 

Io's shadow sat right on top of NEB, which made it difficult to see in the Telemator, because of the poor seeing and dim image. Both Io and Europa were completely invisible on the disk of Jupiter. Only once Io were close to the edge could I see it clearly, but this is not unusual. 

 

The shadow of Europa only hit Jupiter in the middle of the session. It was *just* above NEB, making it a little easier to see. Had it been centered on the NEB, I'm not sure I could have seen it in the Telemator. As it was, it was difficult enough already. It was plain and easy in the 6". 

 

Strangely, the seeing suddenly improved markedly, and although not perfect by any means, was suddenly good enough to allow some good details to be visible in the 6" and the shadows much more certainly in the Telemator, although Europa's shadow was still very difficult. In the 6", SEB now split in two halves, each mottled and broken up in many tiny parts. NEB was partially split by a very thin band, but was smoother than SEB. The equatorial zone sported mottling and hints of festoons. 

 

When Io moved out from the disk, I observed it with the 6". It's quite fun to watch, as it happens surprisingly rapidly. It takes only ten minutes or so. Once it was just outside the disk, separated by a hair of blackness, I went over to the Telemator and compared the views. I could not see a difference in apparent size between Io and Jupiter in the two instruments. I compared with the tiny, black separation, which was also evident in the Telemator, as well as with the width of the NEB. In both the 6" and the 63mm, the dimensions appeared the same. This proves to me, that even a 63mm shows the true size of the Jovian satellites. 

 

During the evening, thick haze came and went several times. After the spell of good seeing, thick haze moved in once more and the seeing went back down. I turned my attention to the east, where the haze had not yet reached, and looked at M13 with the 6" and an 11mm ES82. The view was superb. Very dark background and pinpoint stars to the edge of the field. M13 was resolved in hundreds of faint stars, arranged in long, curved chains. NGC 6207 nearby was also visible. 

 

After this, the haze started to thicken once more and I decided to call it a night. Despite the mediocre conditions, it had been quite a nice session.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#166 DMala

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 08:47 AM

Thanks Allan that's exactly the info I was looking for.



#167 Terra Nova

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 02:22 PM

I stood out in the wind and dodged clouds for an hour or so this brisk and breezy morning to peer at the sun through the suckerholes. My vintage 50x600 Tower, equiped with a Unitron Herschel wedge, Unitron 18mm Kellner eyepiece (24X with this system), and Unitron ND3 Solar filter, and mounted on my UA Dwarfstar and Paragon XHD tripod was perfect for the task. It perfectly matched the field and magnification that my Coronado H-alpha Maxscope was configured for.

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Edited by terraclarke, 02 April 2016 - 03:20 PM.

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#168 kansas skies

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 03:39 PM

Setting up for solar observation is high on my list of things to do when I finish setting up my 60mm Unitron. Somehow, I feel as though I'm missing out on a lot by not having the ability to observe the sun.

 

Bill


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#169 Terra Nova

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 06:34 PM

I do far more solar observing than anything else.
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#170 Bomber Bob

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 08:35 PM

Got in about an hour of Jupiter with Edna.  Turbulent air aloft, but she delivered spurts of 7 belts like a machine gun.  Switched to my SS151, and the 60mm handled the twinkling a bit better.  Jove got behind trees, so I started sweeping with the ER16, until thin fog rose.  Not surprised with 4" of rain in the ground!  I put the scope on the covered back porch, and I'll check again in an hour or so.


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#171 Astrojensen

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 02:40 AM

Setting up for solar observation is high on my list of things to do when I finish setting up my 60mm Unitron. Somehow, I feel as though I'm missing out on a lot by not having the ability to observe the sun.

 

Bill

You have no idea how much you miss out on. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#172 C64ER

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 06:39 AM

I stood out in the wind and dodged clouds for an hour or so this brisk and breezy morning to peer at the sun through the suckerholes. My vintage 50x600 Tower, equiped with a Unitron Herschel wedge, Unitron 18mm Kellner eyepiece (24X with this system), and Unitron ND3 Solar filter, and mounted on my UA Dwarfstar and Paragon XHD tripod was perfect for the task. It perfectly matched the field and magnification that my Coronado H-alpha Maxscope was configured for.

 

Terra you are a brave soul.  :)

I not that far north of you and it was a crazy day yesterday. Constant high winds, hail, and we had a brief whiteout from a snow squall. But it did clear out after dark but still too breezy for me.


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#173 Bomber Bob

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 10:16 AM

The fog thinned about 10PM local, so I got in another hour of Jupiter, mostly with the 151.  It gave sharper views at 150x than Edna, which kept trying to steam up.  I think her lens cell is cast iron or steel - maybe that's a factor.  At times the 151 split the SEB into two belts with a very thin cream-colored seam.

 

Seeing should be much better tonight, after a sunny day dries the ground - I hope.


Edited by Bomber Bob, 03 April 2016 - 10:16 AM.


#174 Terra Nova

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 11:17 AM

I did my observing yesterday morning when the wind was only gusting to 15 knots. By afternoon and last night it was howling (>50knots) to the point it would have even blown a heavy 4" F15 refractor over. I had the good sense to stay inside!
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#175 Bomber Bob

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 08:41 PM

Big Rosie captured the Great Red Spot, even before the end of twilight.  My Sears 6336 (Royal 76x1200) & Philips SC900D did well despite the shaky air.  For the first time ever, I used the Royal 3x Barlow that came with this scope.  Here are some raw samples of what I saw:

 

Sears 6336 - Jupiter (GRS) 20160404V01C01.jpg   Sears 6336 - Jupiter (GRS) 20160404V01S01.jpg   Sears 6336 - Jupiter (GRS) 20160404V04C01.jpg   Sears 6336 - Jupiter (GRS) 20160404V04S01.jpg

 


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