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Your M-31 Images Will Continue To Improve....Why?

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#51 Klitwo

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 05:19 PM

Andromeda (M-31) has moved an estimated 1,440,000,000 billion miles closer to our galaxy since the start of this thread on Feb. 26, 2016.  Better hold off at least for now pulling out those lawn chairs, your trusty binoculars and barbecue for a good cosmic view for just a little longer until you see it filling the night sky...which it should be in another 3.75 billion years or even perhaps a little sooner....that's when I'll put out another update...if I'm still around that is, but don't count on it.  In the mean time while you're waiting for this fantastic far-in-the-future cosmic event to take place, it doesn't hurt to keep tabs on the progress every once in a while by knocking the dust off of your binos or telescope for a quick view in preparation for it....Right?

 

Klitwo


Edited by Klitwo, 18 October 2016 - 06:47 PM.

 

#52 mako_reactor

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 08:24 PM

When I saw the Hubble's high res picture of Andromeda (http://hubblesite.or...02/image/a/warn), I was blown away when I saw the stars of another galaxy! Can't wait to see what kind of nebula Andromeda has  :)


 

#53 srosenfraz

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 09:26 PM

Hi Klitwo - you sure about the 1,440,000,000 billion miles figure?  From what I can gather, M31 is approaching us at about 65 miles/sec (109 km/sec - see https://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6864).  If that figure is correct, then M31 is about 5.6 million miles closer each day (65 mi/sec * 86400 sec/day).  So, in the 235 days between today and February 26, I calculate that M31 is about 1.3 billion miles closer to us.  Perhaps you meant 1,440,000,000 miles (not billion miles)?

 

Scott

 

 



Andromeda (M-31) has moved an estimated 1,440,000,000 billion miles closer to our galaxy since the start of this thread on Feb. 26, 2016.  Better hold off at least for now pulling out those lawn chairs, your trusty binoculars and barbecue for a good cosmic view for just a little longer until you see it filling the night sky...which it should be in another 3.75 billion years or even perhaps a little sooner....that's when I'll put out another update...if I'm still around that is, but don't count on it.  In the mean time while you're waiting for this fantastic far-in-the-future cosmic event to take place, it doesn't hurt to keep tabs on the progress every once in a while by knocking the dust off of your binos or telescope for a quick view in preparation for it....Right?

 

Klitwo

 


 

#54 Klitwo

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 09:57 PM

 

Hi Klitwo - you sure about the 1,440,000,000 billion miles figure?  From what I can gather, M31 is approaching us at about 65 miles/sec (109 km/sec - see https://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6864).  If that figure is correct, then M31 is about 5.6 million miles closer each day (65 mi/sec * 86400 sec/day).  So, in the 235 days between today and February 26, I calculate that M31 is about 1.3 billion miles closer to us.  Perhaps you meant 1,440,000,000 miles (not billion miles)?

 

Scott

 

 



Andromeda (M-31) has moved an estimated 1,440,000,000 billion miles closer to our galaxy since the start of this thread on Feb. 26, 2016.  Better hold off at least for now pulling out those lawn chairs, your trusty binoculars and barbecue for a good cosmic view for just a little longer until you see it filling the night sky...which it should be in another 3.75 billion years or even perhaps a little sooner....that's when I'll put out another update...if I'm still around that is, but don't count on it.  In the mean time while you're waiting for this fantastic far-in-the-future cosmic event to take place, it doesn't hurt to keep tabs on the progress every once in a while by knocking the dust off of your binos or telescope for a quick view in preparation for it....Right?

 

Klitwo

 

My humble numbers as I indicated above are "estimated".  I "don't" use a cosmic mileage marker or a galactic stop watch to determine the exact distance traveled (especially a galaxy) or an imagined calendar date of a cosmic event that's going to take place approximately 3.75 billion years from now.  The so-called M-31 and Milky Way velocity numbers seem to change every two or three months or so depending on who or what entity is doing the study and the calculation.  So if you're a real "numbers man" and enjoy doing 6th grade math as you seem to indicate, then perhaps you also might enjoy reading the following link.... 

 

http://www.telegraph...n-expected.html

 

 

Klitwo


Edited by Klitwo, 19 October 2016 - 08:59 AM.

 

#55 srosenfraz

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 01:14 PM

Perhaps my comments were unclean?  I was not trying to differentiate between 1.44 x 10^9 miles versus 1.3 x 10^9 miles.  I was trying to differentiate between your comment that M31 is 1.44 x 10^18 miles ("1,440,000,000 billion miles") closer versus what probably should be on the order of 1.44 x 10^9 miles.  That's a factor of 1 billion - not some difference between varying estimates of M31's velocity (per the paper you cited).

 

And, thank you for the 6th grade math comment - very civil of you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Klitwo - you sure about the 1,440,000,000 billion miles figure?  From what I can gather, M31 is approaching us at about 65 miles/sec (109 km/sec - see https://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6864).  If that figure is correct, then M31 is about 5.6 million miles closer each day (65 mi/sec * 86400 sec/day).  So, in the 235 days between today and February 26, I calculate that M31 is about 1.3 billion miles closer to us.  Perhaps you meant 1,440,000,000 miles (not billion miles)?

 

Scott

 

 



Andromeda (M-31) has moved an estimated 1,440,000,000 billion miles closer to our galaxy since the start of this thread on Feb. 26, 2016.  Better hold off at least for now pulling out those lawn chairs, your trusty binoculars and barbecue for a good cosmic view for just a little longer until you see it filling the night sky...which it should be in another 3.75 billion years or even perhaps a little sooner....that's when I'll put out another update...if I'm still around that is, but don't count on it.  In the mean time while you're waiting for this fantastic far-in-the-future cosmic event to take place, it doesn't hurt to keep tabs on the progress every once in a while by knocking the dust off of your binos or telescope for a quick view in preparation for it....Right?

 

Klitwo

 

My humble numbers as I indicated above are "estimated".  I "don't" use a cosmic mileage marker or a galactic stop watch to determine the exact distance traveled (especially a galaxy) or an imagined calendar date of a cosmic event that's going to take place approximately 3.75 billion years from now.  The so-called M-31 and Milky Way velocity numbers seem to change every two or three months or so depending on who or what entity is doing the study and the calculation.  So if you're a real "numbers man" and enjoy doing 6th grade math as you seem to indicate, then perhaps you also might enjoy reading the following link.... 

 

http://www.telegraph...n-expected.html

 

 

Klitwo

 


 

#56 Klitwo

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 01:57 PM

 

Perhaps my comments were unclean?  I was not trying to differentiate between 1.44 x 10^9 miles versus 1.3 x 10^9 miles.  I was trying to differentiate between your comment that M31 is 1.44 x 10^18 miles ("1,440,000,000 billion miles") closer versus what probably should be on the order of 1.44 x 10^9 miles.  That's a factor of 1 billion - not some difference between varying estimates of M31's velocity (per the paper you cited).

 

And, thank you for the 6th grade math comment - very civil of you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Klitwo - you sure about the 1,440,000,000 billion miles figure?  From what I can gather, M31 is approaching us at about 65 miles/sec (109 km/sec - see https://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6864).  If that figure is correct, then M31 is about 5.6 million miles closer each day (65 mi/sec * 86400 sec/day).  So, in the 235 days between today and February 26, I calculate that M31 is about 1.3 billion miles closer to us.  Perhaps you meant 1,440,000,000 miles (not billion miles)?

 

Scott

 

 



Andromeda (M-31) has moved an estimated 1,440,000,000 billion miles closer to our galaxy since the start of this thread on Feb. 26, 2016.  Better hold off at least for now pulling out those lawn chairs, your trusty binoculars and barbecue for a good cosmic view for just a little longer until you see it filling the night sky...which it should be in another 3.75 billion years or even perhaps a little sooner....that's when I'll put out another update...if I'm still around that is, but don't count on it.  In the mean time while you're waiting for this fantastic far-in-the-future cosmic event to take place, it doesn't hurt to keep tabs on the progress every once in a while by knocking the dust off of your binos or telescope for a quick view in preparation for it....Right?

 

Klitwo

 

My humble numbers as I indicated above are "estimated".  I "don't" use a cosmic mileage marker or a galactic stop watch to determine the exact distance traveled (especially a galaxy) or an imagined calendar date of a cosmic event that's going to take place approximately 3.75 billion years from now.  The so-called M-31 and Milky Way velocity numbers seem to change every two or three months or so depending on who or what entity is doing the study and the calculation.  So if you're a real "numbers man" and enjoy doing 6th grade math as you seem to indicate, then perhaps you also might enjoy reading the following link.... 

 

http://www.telegraph...n-expected.html

 

 

Klitwo

 

 

You're certainly welcome....and your comments about M-31 and our Milky Way galaxy are certainly welcome too.....

 

Klitwo


Edited by Klitwo, 20 October 2016 - 01:58 AM.

 

#57 Klitwo

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:12 PM

Let's see what Nadia Drake (National Geographic) has to say about the impending galactic collision between Andromeda and the Milky Way......

 

P.S. Keep in mind the velocity of the two galaxies seems to be continually changing at a much faster rate.  Example:  Current studies of the Milky Way indicate a velocity over 600,000 miles per hour.

 

 

http://phenomena.nat...-galaxys-death/

 

 

Klitwo


Edited by Klitwo, 21 October 2016 - 07:16 PM.

 

#58 Klitwo

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 08:21 PM

The good news is....this will probably be my last update that I'll post in this thread for the next 3.75 billion years.  As expected...more and more excitement is building each day as both galaxies are rapidly closing in on each other!  Sadly...none of us will be around to enjoy this spectacular galactic event.  You can rest assured in less than 4 billion years...those fortunate few beings, aliens or entities or whatever they are (if any), who are still lucky enough to be around then....are going to have a great view of the great cosmic collision between M-31 and our Milky Way galaxy!  Lucky them.

 

Here's are some excellent You-Tube video simulations of the impending future galactic merger.....Enjoy!

 

 

Klitwo

 

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=PrIk6dKcdoU


Edited by Klitwo, 13 November 2016 - 04:55 AM.

 

#59 steven_usa

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Posted 13 November 2016 - 11:06 AM

Some comments:

 

(1) In that high resolution NASA image of M31, did they "subtract out" the local stars of our Milky Way?  It's an impressive image for sure, but just keep in mind the brighter stars in the image may be native to our own galaxy, not M31. 

 

(2) Imagine how sad it would be for a planet with perpetual clouds.  Perhaps like Venus.  It remains to be seen if such a planet could actually support life.  But if it could, I wonder how much the advancement of any civilization there would be "stunted" due to lack of visible stars.  

 

(3) Imagine if we didn't have our moon.   It just seems to me, we have these "stepping stones" for getting off this planet.  The moon was large enough to give our ancestors curiosity, eventually leading to realize "it is probably a big rock that we could travel to" and it's just near enough we actually did that.   Mars seems like the next "stepping stone" (imagine how stunted we would be academically if we were the ONLY planet in the solar system!), then perhaps Titan or some moon like that next.   Then even the next nearest star seems like a feasible stepping stone someday -- current estimates I've read is it takes ~100 years to travel to the nearest star, which I find ironic that this number is approximately our age limit of a single generation.      Then lastly, consider how this nearest galaxy to us -- we don't have to go to it, it's just coming to us for free :)

 

What if stellar winds or some such thing ends up "flowing" the Milky Way and M31 past each other?  Isn't that a theory, there is enough dark matter stuff to counter-act gravity?


Edited by steven_usa, 13 November 2016 - 11:11 AM.

 

#60 Klitwo

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 01:32 AM

According to NASA....the good news is that M-31 and the Milky Way may have already started to collide with each other.  Better start breaking out your trusty binoculars, lawn chairs and a cooler of cold beer and get ready to start watching the fireworks over the next 3.75 billion years .....See the following link.

 

Klitwo

 

http://www.huffingto..._n_7303558.html


Edited by Klitwo, 24 February 2017 - 03:14 AM.

 

#61 kd4pbs

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 10:24 AM

I hear that the "International star registry" is already gearing up to take advantage of millions more people on Earth with their new and improved, "Name a Star in the Andromeda Galaxy" marketing campaign.  :lol:


 

#62 Klitwo

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 03:12 AM

Based on the following link...sounds like we've ready crashed into Andromeda once before. Too bad we weren't around yet for that one. With only 3.75 billion years to wait for the next big block buster...you might want to start pulling out those lawn chairs, get some extra heavy duty sun block and start chilling down those beers. Never to early to start planning ahead...Right?

Klitwo

https://www.newscien...-gravitys-laws/

Edited by Klitwo, 27 February 2017 - 10:59 AM.

 

#63 Klitwo

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 02:12 AM

About ten billion years ago the evening sky might have been quite a sight to see. Too bad our solar system wasn't around then...or we either for that fact. See the following link.

Klitwo

https://www.ras.org....llion-years-ago

Edited by Klitwo, 02 March 2017 - 02:27 AM.

 

#64 Klitwo

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 12:06 AM

Guess what? In about 4 billion years from now...our solar system could be possibly swallowed up by either our own big supermassive black hole or Andromeda's even larger one when we finally collide with each other...believe it or not! Just to be ready for it if in fact it does happen...be sure and leave that day "blank" on your calendar...See the following links for all of the exciting details.

Klitwo

https://www.thesun.c...tronomer-warns/

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=rAL254CorzE

 


Edited by Klitwo, 04 March 2017 - 04:29 AM.

 

#65 Klitwo

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 12:11 PM

Once the collision between Andromeda and our Milky Way galaxy starts to take place...our solar system will in fact become the target for one of the many Andromeda's trove of hungry black holes that lie embedded within it's interior...In the next 4 or 5 billion years Andromeda's many black holes (the most of any galaxy discovered so far) will indeed multiply by an even larger amount than it has now "big time"....See the following link.

Klitwo


http://www.space.com...eda-galaxy.html

Edited by Klitwo, 06 March 2017 - 02:11 PM.

 

#66 Klitwo

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 01:43 PM

This makes for an interesting read about the impending collision with Andromeda....See the following link.

Klitwo

https://www.forbes.c...y/#11fcaa423fdf
 

#67 Klitwo

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 02:11 PM

Too bad our solar system and planet Earth weren't around 10 billion years ago for the 1st. round.  But alas...if we're lucky...real lucky, maybe a few of us humans or what's left of us (if any) who didn't get "barbecued" too much by the ever increasing heat of our red giant sun will get a second chance in another 4 billion years to view the collision once again....See the following link.

 

Klitwo

 

https://www.extremet...llion-years-ago


Edited by Klitwo, 12 March 2017 - 02:34 PM.

 

#68 Klitwo

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 10:15 PM

Here's some interesting info about the possible colliding of stars together when Andromeda finally closes in on the Milky Way...See the following link for details.

Klitwo

https://www.quora.co...of-two-galaxies
 

#69 steven_usa

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 01:46 AM

Nice link, thanks -- particularly the visual about the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy.


 

#70 Klitwo

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:50 PM

When galaxies collide...Black Holes eat! See the following link for details.

Klitwo

http://earthsky.org/...00-times-faster
 

#71 Bloated Star

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:31 PM

Not sure about our heavier elements, but the 10% of us that consists of hydrogen was indeed there the first time around, no? Still like the thought that "we" were around billions of years ago. We have just had our elements rearranged!
 

#72 Klitwo

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 12:36 AM

Watch out!...Andromeda and the Milky Way's supermassive black holes are going to collide with each other in less than 3.75 billion years! See the following You-tube video for details....

Klitwo

https://www.youtube....h?v=zVf2pU4F9j4
 

#73 Klitwo

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 02:32 PM

And yet another prediction of the outcome of the collision. ....See the following link

 

Klitwo

 

http://www.businessi...a-galaxy-2016-1


 

#74 Klitwo

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 05:07 PM

The big question is:  Why is Andromeda headed in our direction if the universe is expanding?....See the following link for the answer.

 

Klitwo

 

https://www.spaceans...dromeda-galaxy/


 

#75 Klitwo

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 10:44 PM

With Andromeda's larger supermassive black Hole and our Milky Way's supermassive black hole....anything can happen after they collide with other..... See the following link.

 

Klitwo

 

https://www.universe...-eat-milky-way/


 


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