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Some sort of water flea in dark field...

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#1 scottk

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 10:45 AM

I took this image 5 or 6 years ago using an amscope, canon 1000d, a piece of telephone book cover cut into a diy dark field filter, and a cheap camera/microscope adapter. I was surprised at how much detail showed up. It's from a sample of pondwater. Always been rather proud of this image. I posted it with the title "Dapnia 150x", but through the comments people left under the image I learned that it is not an actual Daphnia, but possibly several other breeds.

 

https://www.flickr.c...@N06/5231119565


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#2 perseid28

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 08:57 AM

Wow, that's an excellent picture! The lighting really is well-done. I had an interest in macro photography a few years back, but eventually decided against it because of the high expense of DSLR macro lenses, ring flashes, and such.

#3 scottk

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 09:48 AM

perseid28, on 07 May 2016 - 08:57 AM, said:perseid28, on 07 May 2016 - 08:57 AM, said:perseid28, on 07 May 2016 - 08:57 AM, said:perseid28, on 07 May 2016 - 08:57 AM, said:

Wow, that's an excellent picture! The lighting really is well-done. I had an interest in macro photography a few years back, but eventually decided against it because of the high expense of DSLR macro lenses, ring flashes, and such.

 

Thanks.

 

It was through an Amscope B490. Forgot to mention that.

 

I think I was using this kind of adaptor that has a built in 2x lens...

 

http://www.microscop...CFQmQaQodNukKMA

 

http://www.microscop...CFQmQaQodNukKMA


Edited by scottk, 07 May 2016 - 10:01 AM.


#4 Chilihead

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 10:08 AM

That's really nice Scott.

 

I'm taking delivery of a new AmScope T490B today (or so the post office tells me). 

 

Now I'll have something to do on cloudy nights.



#5 kozmik frakture

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Posted 31 July 2016 - 07:25 PM

ScottK:  that is an excellent photo and I do think it is a Daphnia species.  There are some species that have less "antennae, claws, feeler" or whatever they are and have that shape of "beak".  Attached are some similar Daphnia.  It seems I see more of the longer antennae / claws tribe than this one.

 

Chilihead:  hope you did get your Amscope T490B.  That's my main workhorse and its done well.

Attached Thumbnails

  • daph 1 reduced.jpg
  • daph yellow fiter more mag reduced.jpg
  • daph 12-18-15 1 reduced.jpg


#6 scottk

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 11:00 PM

Thanks Kozmik. 

 

I was amazed by what I got here with an $800 setup. I thought that with an Amscope and a 70 dollar camera adapter that had some sort of weird 2x lens in it I'd never get a good picture. I made the darkfeild filter out of a cut up telephone book cover. Did this during college. It was a lucky shot - getting such great detail.

 

:)

 

Phase contrast stuff, which is very expensive, really "wows" me often times. Wish there was a way to do DIY phase contrast. The DIY darkfeild think cost me $0.00 


Edited by scottk, 03 August 2016 - 11:02 PM.


#7 maxviewer

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 02:36 PM

The little critters in the pics are cladocerans, specifically Chydoridae, not Daphnia, which are in the Daphniidae family.  Cladocerans are fascinating microcrustacea found in fresh waters (and maybe marine, too), typically reproducing by parthenogenesis (look it up).  The chydorids are typically found around the edges of ponds especially, but also lakes, grazing on algae, detritus and whatever's growing on the plants and pond bottom (e.g., diatoms, desmids).  Daphnids are more open-water swimmers and abundant in lakes, but some species are also adapted to ponds, filter feeding on algae.  Some species of Daphnia show seasonal changes in the shape of their head, which is what I did my grad research on.  I know--TMI.  Anyhoo, the pic on flicker is indeed extremely good!



#8 nicoyenny

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 02:55 PM

El chupacabras!! (j/k) nice images !!!

When I was in school, my parents bought me one of those "1200x" tasco microscopes, at most 250X was reasonable, but hey, I loved it, and had much fun with it.



#9 JoeInMN

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 11:47 AM

An old thread maybe, but I'll chime in... Looks to me like an ostracod, as someone mentioned in the Flickr comments. Nice photo!

CypridinaMediterranea.png


Edited by JoeInMN, 04 November 2017 - 11:49 AM.


#10 KarlL

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 08:57 PM

Scott -

 

Excellent flickr image.



#11 aatt

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 11:05 AM

The little critters in the pics are cladocerans, specifically Chydoridae, not Daphnia, which are in the Daphniidae family.  Cladocerans are fascinating microcrustacea found in fresh waters (and maybe marine, too), typically reproducing by parthenogenesis (look it up).  The chydorids are typically found around the edges of ponds especially, but also lakes, grazing on algae, detritus and whatever's growing on the plants and pond bottom (e.g., diatoms, desmids).  Daphnids are more open-water swimmers and abundant in lakes, but some species are also adapted to ponds, filter feeding on algae.  Some species of Daphnia show seasonal changes in the shape of their head, which is what I did my grad research on.  I know--TMI.  Anyhoo, the pic on flicker is indeed extremely good!

Were you looking at kairomone induced changes or was it something else? just curious.




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