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Post a Picture of Your Classic Telescope- with or without you!

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3783 replies to this topic

#3726 R Botero

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 05:20 AM

Some chicken!
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#3727 Bowlerhat

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 08:24 PM

King 40mm F20 
King 40mm F20 (1)
Telementor II
Zeiss Jena Telementor II (3)
Unknown 60/910mm vixen
Vixen Custom 60mm (1)
Goto Kogaku Telepac 60
Goto Kogaku Telepac 60 (1)
Goto Kogaku Telepac 60 (3)
 
And yes, I know, I opted for modern mounts.

Edited by Bowlerhat, 30 September 2020 - 08:38 PM.

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#3728 PawPaw

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 10:42 PM

Bowlerhat.....That is quite a nice stable of classics. I like them all........I especially like GOTO Kogaku  and have the later version of the telepac 60,  called the ST-6.  How does the telepac perform compared to the other 60mm?  Do you have the original mount?

 

Cheers

 

Don


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#3729 Bowlerhat

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 10:50 PM

The telepac performs well, sharper a bit than vixen. Unfortunately the mount came broken- it was missing a handle and the altitude/zimuth gear is broken. Howevever I can tell by moving it that the movement is just so solid and smooth, pneumatic.

 

I like it has one wheel like telementor, but I think while it looks good, the rivets are problematic to actually clean and restoring it.

 

Also, a 40mm sears reflector. I wonder what's the actual specs of the focal length. 

Sears 40mm 100x power (1)

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#3730 DouglasPaul

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Posted 04 October 2020 - 08:02 AM

Nuthin fancy..

 

007.jpg


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#3731 Bowlerhat

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Posted 04 October 2020 - 09:05 AM

Nuthin fancy..

 

007.jpg

That towa looks tiny next to that big red Dob


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#3732 DouglasPaul

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Posted 04 October 2020 - 09:17 AM

That towa looks tiny next to that big red Dob

It's like setting a 22 next to a cannon...

 

011.jpg


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#3733 BKSo

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Posted 05 October 2020 - 06:41 AM

Don't think I have posted a picture here. No Meade blue

IMG_0340.jpg


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#3734 Matej

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 05:18 AM

Here is my old Tasco Newtonian telescope 114/900. I have been given the scope as a birthday present from my father when I was 12. Such things were impossible to be get in my country in those times, so it of course was secondhand, an import from Germany. I have been using the scope ever since and I am using it still very often. It’s performance is excellent. A few months ago a strong wind forced the tripod to fall and thus got broken. The tube was smashed and the original mount was broken irreparably. I succeeded in repairing the tube and bought a new tripod and mount. However it is meant just as a limited-time solution until I make a new altazimuth fork mount. https://refraktorian.../Tasco_114_900/
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#3735 Augustus

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 10:14 AM

Astroscan I found at a yard sale. Has a huge chip out of the back of the secondary, a crack in the housing and I struggled to collimate it since you can't seem to remove the front snap ring (I flexed the snap ring inside the telescope by sticking my fingers in the focuser then pushed on the optical window to rotate it), but REALLY nice optics. I wager 1/6 wave and really smooth. Gives great wide-field and planetary views, on par with if not better than my ETX-90. Really early serial # of 1376.

 

IMG_6986.JPEG


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#3736 TerryD23

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 09:04 PM

1007201610 HDR~2
 
My Celestron Ultima 9.25 SCT that I bought new about 25 years ago.

 


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#3737 CCD-Freak

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 09:51 PM

Here is my Ultima 8 I have restored and tricked out with all sorts of upgrades...

 

This scope is a joy to use and I have no plans to ever part with it.

 

C8 on Ultima-17.JPG

 

John Love

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WD5IKX


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#3738 icomet

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Posted 09 October 2020 - 11:04 AM

Chickens are very smart but try as I might they have no interest in looking into

a eyepiece, too bad because their eyes are most excellent for astronomy.

Their eyes are tetrachromatic. They have 4 types of cones that let them see

red, blue, and green light, as well as ultraviolet.

Chickens have an additional double cone structure that helps them to track

movement.

Because their eyes are so sensitive, they can see tiny light fluctuations that are

imperceptible to humans.

Chickens can use each eye independently on different tasks simultaneously.

Chickens also have mono-vision. The left eye is far sighted, and the right eye

is near sighted.

Robert

 

attachicon.gifpost-50896-0-59877200-1440288023_thumb.jpg

attachicon.gifpost-50896-0-89425400-1518390744_thumb.jpg

So, you're saying then, that your chicken's eyes are like Marty Feldman's.

 

Clear Skies.


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#3739 hasebergen

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 01:45 AM

My newest classic telescope ... a selfbuilt (it was not me ;-) ) Lichtenknecker Schaer-Refractor 150/3000mm - late 70ties ... I owned it some days ago and here (on a northern german little starparty) it got it´s first photons (bad conditions: strong seeing and mostly cloudy ...)

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#3740 Rustler46

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 01:10 AM

The classic home made telescope back in the mid-1900s was the 6-inch f/8 reflector. 

 

6-inch Reflector.jpg

 

The story behind the above telescope was also posted in Blast from the Past. My interest in astronomy began as a 16 year old in 1962, when I picked up an issue of Sky and Telescope magazine at a local news stand. Subsequent issues right up to the present have been read with much interest. Back then I had begun saving my meager earnings to buy a Unitron 2.4-inch refractor, prominently display on a full page back cover advertisement. Then I noticed a listing in the magazine of a local astronomy club - Astronomers of Humboldt, in Eureka, California. So I wrote to the contact telling of my goal to purchase that lusted-for refractor. Soon I received a reply saying: "Don't buy that telescope. Come to our meeting this weekend, and we'll show you how to make your own telescope".
 

Thus came into existence the telescope you see. I ground and polished the mirror, with my mentor (a 55-year old father figure) doing the final stages of parabolizing. The book Making Your Own Telescope (by Allyn J. Thompson) served as a further guide. I have fond memories of grinding/polishing the mirror on the dining-room table in my grandmother's house, where I was living. This dear lady, having been born in 1889, never questioned what her 16 year old grandson was doing. I did manage to keep from messing up her table, which I'm sure she appreciated.

 

Making Your Own Telescope.jpg

 

Eventually I finished the mirror (as an f/7), made a plywood tube, purchased a secondary mirror, spider, focuser and M-17 elbow telescope for a finder. The latter was a war surplus tank gunnery sight, an 8X50. The version with coated optics cost $30 in 1962. Mine was uncoated, and I remember it being about 15-20 big 1962 dollars. My first eyepiece was a Brandon 32mm, which I still own. But having no mount I took my newly finished telescope, set the mirror end on the ground and propped it up with a bench. Then I was awed by the view of the Moon rising over Grandma's house. Astronomy has continued to be a "blast" for the last 58 years. 
 

In the photo is a sheet film astro-camera borrowed from the local college physics department. I still have some moon negatives from that period. Also the equatorial mount has an interesting history. The two pillow block bearings and polar axle were dug out of the mud by my older brother after a flood in the 1960s. I took it all apart and cleaned it up. Then following the directions in the above mentioned book, I poured a babbit bearing inside a galvanized tee pipe fitting. My brother arc-welded this onto the end of the polar shaft. This formed the main parts of the equatorial mount seen in the photo. The declination axis is a heavy solid cold-rolled steel shaft about 1-1/2 inches in diameter. The counterweight is the front crankshaft pulley from a 1956 Ford 292 V-8 engine. For years it had no motor drive, not even having much of a friction pad to keep pointed where aimed. Initially I just jammed a rolled up wad of newspapers under the polar shaft, as seen in the photo. Eventually it had a Mathis 6-inch worm gear set installed, when the mount carried my 2nd home made telescope, an 8-inch f/4.8. But that is another story.
 
As mentioned the above was my second telescope (but the 1st one home made). While making that one, my first telescope was given to me by my mother's co-worker. This was my now 212-year old Dollond spyglass. It is discussed in Adventures With a 200 Year Old Dollond Achromat. That first telescope of mine is a real blast from the far past.

 

I hope you've enjoyed this story of one sort of classic telescope.

 

Best Regards,

Russ


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#3741 John Rogers

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 09:19 AM

Great reminisces Russ!  I love seeing the M17 elbow telescope finder.  They are still abundantly available on eBay.  With patience, one can obtain one for less than $40 delivered.  The majority of that cost is for shipping.  A not-so-known fact is that they were a source for the venerable Edmund 1-1/8" eyepiece optics.

 

Your opening "mid-1900s" description makes us sound old!


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#3742 mdowns

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 09:50 AM

Russ,

 This was such a fun read,bringing back so many old memories along the way.You used a crankshaft pulley as a counterweight,I used a front rotor off my 69 plymouth fury as a counterweight for a 10" build.I hav'nt thought about that for years.Many thanks for the reminders!


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#3743 Rustler46

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 02:11 PM

Great reminisces Russ!  I love seeing the M17 elbow telescope finder.  They are still abundantly available on eBay.  With patience, one can obtain one for less than $40 delivered.  The majority of that cost is for shipping.  A not-so-known fact is that they were a source for the venerable Edmund 1-1/8" eyepiece optics.

 

Your opening "mid-1900s" description makes us sound old!

Thanks for your comments, John. Yet old is relative. We can still be young in heart, despite our age in years.  But I was in fact born in the first half of the previous century. Now that sounds old. gramps.gif .

 

As for the finder, it still resides on my 8-inch reflector. 

 

Russ


Edited by Rustler46, 23 October 2020 - 02:13 PM.

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#3744 Rustler46

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 02:35 PM

Russ,

 This was such a fun read,bringing back so many old memories along the way.You used a crankshaft pulley as a counterweight,I used a front rotor off my 69 plymouth fury as a counterweight for a 10" build.I hav'nt thought about that for years.Many thanks for the reminders!

Yes, we all have interesting stories about our trip on the road of life. That 6-inch telescope has only recently come back to my attention when I found an old color photo in a box of slides and pictures. So a quick scan brought it back into focus.

 

I've been looking at my 8-inch reflector OTA that is standing in plain sight in my garage. Though I greatly appreciate my C-11 on go-to Losmandy mount, that old Newtonian was my optic of choice for many years. The star atlas & finder method works great when modern technology isn't available. Despite my old body not agreeing with finder 'scope use, I've been thinking of dragging out the mount for my second home made telescope. That 53-year old telescope should be fun to use again. The Hurst motor died a few years back. But I should be able to find a replacement online. In any case, when I get an opportunity, I'll share the story of that telescope.

 

Warm Regards,

Russ


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#3745 Rustler46

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 02:57 PM

Great reminisces Russ!  I love seeing the M17 elbow telescope finder.  They are still abundantly available on eBay.  With patience, one can obtain one for less than $40 delivered.  The majority of that cost is for shipping.  A not-so-known fact is that they were a source for the venerable Edmund 1-1/8" eyepiece optics.

I would highly recommend the M-17 as a great finder. While a bit heavy (built like a tank) it gives erect image, right angled views. The quality of construction is very high. I would suggest getting the coated optics version, though my uncoated one works fine.

 

Russ


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#3746 Terra Nova

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 02:58 PM

Despite my old body not agreeing with finder 'scope use, I've been thinking of dragging out the mount for my second home made telescope. That 53-year old telescope should be fun to use again.

 

I can totally relate. Sam Brown’s (Edmund Sci.) Telescopes You Can Build along with Allyn Thompson’s Making Your Own Telescope were my guides in building the 6” F4.5 Newtonian 53 years ago that I still have. And I had fun with it again this summer when Comet Neowise made its appearance. But like you, I found that my old body wasn’t enjoying using the telescope’s finder near as much as using the telescope itself. My solution was replacing the scope’s equally old 40mm 10X straight-thru finder with a Green Laser Pointer. The GLP saved by knees, back, and neck and made using my old Newt a lot more pleasurable. 

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#3747 Rustler46

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 05:46 PM

Despite my old body not agreeing with finder 'scope use, I've been thinking of dragging out the mount for my second home made telescope. That 53-year old telescope should be fun to use again.

 

I can totally relate. Sam Brown’s (Edmund Sci.) Telescopes You Can Build along with Allyn Thompson’s Making Your Own Telescope were my guides in building the 6” F4.5 Newtonian 53 years ago that I still have. And I had fun with it again this summer when Comet Neowise made its appearance. But like you, I found that my old body wasn’t enjoying using the telescope’s finder near as much as using the telescope itself. My solution was replacing the scope’s equally old 40mm 10X straight-thru finder with a Green Laser Pointer. The GLP saved by knees, back, and neck and made using my old Newt a lot more pleasurable. 

Thanks for your comment, Terra. In accord with "great minds think alike", before I read your reply I was thinking while going about shopping today. Then the brilliant idea popped into my brain - attach that laser to the M-17! I can't wait to do that. It can be attached to the side of the M-17 which will make it point near enough to the same direction. Then with my star atlas to guide me, I just point the scope/finder/laser to the correct point in the sky and viola! - the poor person's go-to mount. 

 

We have it so good today as far as amateur astronomy. The real price of great telescopes has gone way down. A few years ago at a star party I was talking to the gentleman next to me, who had a 10-inch Dob (his first telescope). He was awaiting his second one - a 20-inch reflector! And he was not a wealthy person. In some ways we are in a "golden age" of astronomy with what is available to those who want to look up at the celestial creation.

 

Warm Regards,

Russ


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#3748 Rustler46

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 01:25 AM

Thanks for your comment, Terra. In accord with "great minds think alike", before I read your reply I was thinking while going about shopping today. Then the brilliant idea popped into my brain - attach that laser to the M-17! I can't wait to do that. It can be attached to the side of the M-17 which will make it point near enough to the same direction. Then with my star atlas to guide me, I just point the scope/finder/laser to the correct point in the sky and viola! - the poor person's go-to mount. 

Got the laser attached to the finder on the 8-inch reflector. Just a single large wire-tie and sculpted piece of wood to hold the laser reasonably parallel to the optical axis. With something like a 5° FOV just seeing the star patterns near where the 8-incher is pointed should suffice for finding DSOs. I enjoy that this finder is RACI, so that mental gymnastics aren't required to match eyepiece view to star atlas. Here's what the telescope looked like 51 years ago. Notice that lead diver's weight has been added to the crankshaft pulley for counterweight. This is real high-tech stuff for 1969.

 

8-inch RFT-1.jpg

 

While my 6-inch telescope is long gone (I gave it to a friend), the 8-inch f/4.8 reflector (another mid-1900s classic) now looks very similar to the photo. The mount has greatly changed from the rather crude stage shown above - there is no adjustment for polar axis elevation, no friction brake, no drive motor. Here is what that mount and scope looked like after some improvements 36 years ago.

 

8-inch with Photometer.jpg

 

This setup is when I was doing photoelectric photometry of variable stars (another story). As for the mount, the two heavy pieces of aluminum C-channel are formerly part of a log truck bumper. A local machinist turned that into something adjustable to hold the polar axis bearings. I made the sheet metal cover for the Mathis worm-gear set. The Hurst synchronous motor has died, but could be easily replaced.

 

The photometer is also long gone. But the mount can be drug out of storage and reassembled. I should remove the 8-inch mirror and give it a cleaning before collimation. This may end up being one of my grab-n-go telescopes. While I love my Losmandy mounted C-11 with AT115EDT refractor riding on top, it does take a while to set up and tear down. The mount for my old 8-incher can be left outside under cover in my garden observing site. Then grab the OTA and bolt it on - ready to in less that 2 minutes. We are getting a small bit of much needed drought relief this weekend. But tomorrow night looks to be clear. My old telescope friend will be put back into use. I call it my 8-inch RFT, which stands for Rich Field Telescope. With sub-f/5 optics and 1-1/4 inch eyepieces this gave a wide field of view (wide for the mid 1900s) for DSOs and variable star work. Back then all we had for wide field use were war surplus Erfles. Of course this was long before 2-inch, 80-100° AFOV eyepieces. Times have changed,

 

Best Regards,

Russ


Edited by Rustler46, 24 October 2020 - 01:36 AM.

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#3749 steve t

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 11:21 AM

The classic home made telescope back in the mid-1900s was the 6-inch f/8 reflector. 

 

attachicon.gif6-inch Reflector.jpg

 

The story behind the above telescope was also posted in Blast from the Past. My interest in astronomy began as a 16 year old in 1962, when I picked up an issue of Sky and Telescope magazine at a local news stand. Subsequent issues right up to the present have been read with much interest. Back then I had begun saving my meager earnings to buy a Unitron 2.4-inch refractor, prominently display on a full page back cover advertisement. Then I noticed a listing in the magazine of a local astronomy club - Astronomers of Humboldt, in Eureka, California. So I wrote to the contact telling of my goal to purchase that lusted-for refractor. Soon I received a reply saying: "Don't buy that telescope. Come to our meeting this weekend, and we'll show you how to make your own telescope".
 

Thus came into existence the telescope you see. I ground and polished the mirror, with my mentor (a 55-year old father figure) doing the final stages of parabolizing. The book Making Your Own Telescope (by Allyn J. Thompson) served as a further guide. I have fond memories of grinding/polishing the mirror on the dining-room table in my grandmother's house, where I was living. This dear lady, having been born in 1889, never questioned what her 16 year old grandson was doing. I did manage to keep from messing up her table, which I'm sure she appreciated.

 

attachicon.gifMaking Your Own Telescope.jpg

 

Eventually I finished the mirror (as an f/7), made a plywood tube, purchased a secondary mirror, spider, focuser and M-17 elbow telescope for a finder. The latter was a war surplus tank gunnery sight, an 8X50. The version with coated optics cost $30 in 1962. Mine was uncoated, and I remember it being about 15-20 big 1962 dollars. My first eyepiece was a Brandon 32mm, which I still own. But having no mount I took my newly finished telescope, set the mirror end on the ground and propped it up with a bench. Then I was awed by the view of the Moon rising over Grandma's house. Astronomy has continued to be a "blast" for the last 58 years. 
 

In the photo is a sheet film astro-camera borrowed from the local college physics department. I still have some moon negatives from that period. Also the equatorial mount has an interesting history. The two pillow block bearings and polar axle were dug out of the mud by my older brother after a flood in the 1960s. I took it all apart and cleaned it up. Then following the directions in the above mentioned book, I poured a babbit bearing inside a galvanized tee pipe fitting. My brother arc-welded this onto the end of the polar shaft. This formed the main parts of the equatorial mount seen in the photo. The declination axis is a heavy solid cold-rolled steel shaft about 1-1/2 inches in diameter. The counterweight is the front crankshaft pulley from a 1956 Ford 292 V-8 engine. For years it had no motor drive, not even having much of a friction pad to keep pointed where aimed. Initially I just jammed a rolled up wad of newspapers under the polar shaft, as seen in the photo. Eventually it had a Mathis 6-inch worm gear set installed, when the mount carried my 2nd home made telescope, an 8-inch f/4.8. But that is another story.
 
As mentioned the above was my second telescope (but the 1st one home made). While making that one, my first telescope was given to me by my mother's co-worker. This was my now 212-year old Dollond spyglass. It is discussed in Adventures With a 200 Year Old Dollond Achromat. That first telescope of mine is a real blast from the far past.

 

I hope you've enjoyed this story of one sort of classic telescope.

 

Best Regards,

Russ

Count me in as another alumni of Allyn Thompson's book.

 

My first real scope was a 4" F8.5 Newtonian built back in 1973 per Allyn Thompson's book and the help of a friend of my grandfather that was a hobby machinist I tried to make the 4.25" mirror using Thompsons instructions, but made such a mess of it I ended up sending off to Cave to be figured.

 

I'm still using the mount with my, current, new build, a 4" F/10 Newtonian scope built around an excellent NOS Carton mirror I bought off CN.  Due to its light weight, quick cooldown, and excellent optics, this scope has quickly become the scope I use the most (saving my old backsmile.gif). 

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#3750 jcruse64

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 02:52 PM

Nice!!!!! Russ, please start a new topic and tell us about "I was doing photoelectric photometry of variable stars (another story)". I'd be interested in that.


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