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Post a Picture of Your Classic Telescope- with or without you!

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#3976 clamchip

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Posted 08 September 2021 - 10:32 AM

Here's a old friend of mine, The Optical Craftsmen Discoverer 8 inch f/6.2

The Discoverer was The Optical Craftsmen's economy model. Advertised, "Large Aperture Small Cost."

Mine was built in March 1969. I purchased it Nov 2009.

I added the felt lined clamping silver rings to convert from a 'semi-rotating' tube to full rotating.

Robert

 

post-50896-0-03714400-1591580672.jpg


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#3977 clamchip

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Posted 08 September 2021 - 05:31 PM

Here's my other Discoverer, at least I think it is a Discoverer.

You can sure tell I have observing with a 8 inch Newtonian on my mind !

That's exactly right and it will be this one.

I'm almost certain it's a Discoverer because the cell is placed in the tube for a 6.2 focal ratio

primary mirror. And the distinctive OC only finder mounting rings.

The mount head though is closer to a Pacific Instruments, you can see slight differences with

my Discoverer in the above photo.

When I bought it unfortunately it did not come with the original OC mirror, it came with a unknown

f/6 mirror and the cell springs and bolts made longer for the shorter focal length.

The mirror it did come with had no coatings left so I replaced it with a Parks 8 inch f/6 and while

I was at it a quartz diagonal mirror.

The drive is Byers and really nice to use.

It seems pretty silly owning two of the same thing. I never planned it that way. It just happened.

I can sorta justify the extravagance because the 1969 Discoverer is 100% original so I don't

dare change anything. This one I can make changes and play around with it, greatly increasing

the fun factor.

Robert

 

post-50896-0-88889800-1546407394.jpg


Edited by clamchip, 08 September 2021 - 05:37 PM.

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#3978 Gianluca9999

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Posted 11 September 2021 - 07:11 AM

My beautiful Carl Zeiss Jena Dosenfernrohr (1898-1904). 

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#3979 jgraham

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Posted 11 September 2021 - 10:24 PM

Lookee what showed up at my door today...

 

Unitron 114 #2 (9-11-2021)-1.jpg

 

..a shiny new Unitron 114! I used a Unihex to check it out and it works great! I was also able to cobble together a very solid 1.25" star diagonal to fit the drawtube that came with it so that I could use modern eyepieces with it. The view using Meade Ultrawides were breathtaking. The view of Saturn was sharp and clear and I could see fine detail on Jupiter including a transit of Io and its shadow. The Next Step is to (carefully) remove the original finder and replace it with a modern 30mm RACI. Once fitted with a nice finder and modern eyepieces these make fantastic star-hoppers. I keep all of the original part and I don't drill any new holes in the tube so that I can always put them back in show condition for display, but I always buy these scopes to look through them, not at them. They belong outside collecting starlight, not dust on display somewhere.

 

Wonderful!

 


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#3980 R Botero

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 03:43 AM

My beautiful Carl Zeiss Jena Dosenfernrohr (1898-1904). 

Exquisite bow.gif waytogo.gif


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#3981 hasebergen

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 06:28 AM

A ~110 years old 125/2000mm british refractor; manufactorer so far unknown ... though the lens is not coated it brings famous views on planets, moon und double stars (last pic a comparison to a Vixen 90/1300mm).

best regards Hannes

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#3982 Kasmos

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Posted 12 September 2021 - 02:17 PM

A ~110 years old 125/2000mm british refractor; manufactorer so far unknown ... though the lens is not coated it brings famous views on planets, moon und double stars (last pic a comparison to a Vixen 90/1300mm).

best regards Hannes

Love it's simplicity.... what is the tube made of?


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#3983 clamchip

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 09:16 PM

Good morning Leonard. Captain Crunch again? sounds delightful Robert

 

post-50896-14074142456469_thumb.jpg


Edited by clamchip, 16 September 2021 - 09:21 PM.

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#3984 astronz59

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Posted 17 September 2021 - 05:37 AM

Good morning Leonard. Captain Crunch again? sounds delightful Robert

 

attachicon.gifpost-50896-14074142456469_thumb.jpg

Ah, two bowls! You two gonna eat together then? Awwwwww!


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#3985 ccwemyss

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Posted 18 September 2021 - 08:05 PM

Now that the legs are finished, and the mount has been adjusted so it moves properly in RA, I set up the Edmund 4" to test the tracking. Here it is, with my observing buddy, ready to defend me against stray rabbits.

 

Edmund 4 - 1 (5).jpeg

 

Once I remembered to engage the RA slow motion cam, it tracked Saturn quite well for a good 20 minutes. But by then the clouds in the background had become an overcast, and there were lightning flashes to the east. It's supposed to clear again around 2AM, and I probably could have left it set up, but I wanted to get it packed in the car to take to school tomorrow. 

 

There wasn't really time for cool-down, but Saturn still looked quite good, with nice color and clear Cassini division. 

 

I also set up the 706 mount on the old 60" pedestal. Lifting the 32lb Meade 152 up over my head to put it in the dovetail, and then doing the reverse, brought back all of the memories of fighting to getting the 6" AP's four bolts to drop into the keyhole slots, and the associated moments of terror. The 48" pedestal that I built made it so much easier, but the bracing isn't done, and it's not stable enough without it. 

 

Chip W. 


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#3986 Russell Smith

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Posted 18 September 2021 - 10:48 PM

That is a beautiful scope Chip.
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#3987 hasebergen

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Posted 19 September 2021 - 01:21 PM

Next one please ;-)

 

5 years after buying a original lens and the 7 x 42 viewfinder I could complete the AS80/1200mm Zeissrefractor - on a german small ad portal I could acquire an original Zeiss-Tube from the 50ies - for small money. But: this tube was in a depressingly state and must be refurbished. A friend of mine did this very well - thanks Michael . Yesterday the tube would delivered by parcel service and today I completed the scope. I hope today for a first light ;-)

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Edited by hasebergen, Yesterday, 06:19 AM.

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#3988 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 19 September 2021 - 02:08 PM

Chip said:


 

I also set up the 706 mount on the old 60" pedestal. Lifting the 32lb Meade 152 up over my head to put it in the dovetail, and then doing the reverse, brought back all of the memories of fighting to getting the 6" AP's four bolts to drop into the keyhole slots, and the associated moments of terror. The 48" pedestal that I built made it so much easier, but the bracing isn't done, and it's not stable enough without it. 

 

 

 

 

Chip

It is worth repeating the warnings     Seeing this quote above   I can bide my time waiting for my Lumbar fracture to heal.....(Unfortunate fall off a ladder)

Knowing it will be an important procedure mounting  my 6 inch F12 even in the best of health      I will solicit assistance from folks nearby who have offered to help 

 

Meanwhile    the quality of a Pentax lens is so impressive    even in this small 4.5 lb package. It is about all  I can do for now... Actually   better than binoculars in my present condition

 

 

 

 

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#3989 ccwemyss

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Posted 19 September 2021 - 02:22 PM

If not mounted in an observatory, and wanting an eye position above knee height, I'd probably build a loading dolly, for the 6" f12 scope, that holds it vertically, with a crank that lifts it up from transport level to mount level. The saddle would be positioned vertically, and the dovetail would face out so it could be angled into the saddle at the proper height. Once the saddle is locked down and counterweights added, then release the straps from the dolly and roll it away. 

 

For the Meade, I had no trouble putting it on the shorter pedestal. It only involves lifting to about chest height, so I can reach over. It was so much easier that, after last night, I decided to put the 60" pedestal away and take the shorter one to school. It will be wobbly, but it will also put the eyepiece at a better level for shorter students. I'll take a picture once I get it all set up, and post it. 

 

I did a test of bracing it, with just clamping some oak boards to the pedestal tube and the legs, and it was a vast improvement. The bracing material cam late yesterday, so I'll be working on that next. 

 

Chip W. 


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#3990 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 19 September 2021 - 06:46 PM

Yes   the observatory comes when we downsize the house.....

 I like the loading dolly lift Idea. 



#3991 ccwemyss

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Posted 19 September 2021 - 10:32 PM

They make hand trucks with lifts for gas cylinders. Seems like that gets pretty close. 
 

Chip W.


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#3992 reverse_syzygy

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Posted Yesterday, 12:06 PM

Recently saved a 1966 Tasco 7te-5 No.661490 from Facebook for a measly $40.  I'll need some help/direction in getting this thing cleaned up (gears, wood?, box?,) and figuring out what I need to let it accept 1.25" EPs, but the objective is in great condition.

 

So far it's made a nice neighborhood out-reach kind of thing for the moon, Jupiter, Saturn.  Excuse the sandwich bags around the feet, thought that might help keep them dry from evening dew.  Anyways :

 

SY3N2gb.jpg


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#3993 strdst

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Posted Yesterday, 02:01 PM

Lookee what showed up at my door today...

 

attachicon.gifUnitron 114 #2 (9-11-2021)-1.jpg

 

..a shiny new Unitron 114! I used a Unihex to check it out and it works great! I was also able to cobble together a very solid 1.25" star diagonal to fit the drawtube that came with it so that I could use modern eyepieces with it. The view using Meade Ultrawides were breathtaking. The view of Saturn was sharp and clear and I could see fine detail on Jupiter including a transit of Io and its shadow. The Next Step is to (carefully) remove the original finder and replace it with a modern 30mm RACI. Once fitted with a nice finder and modern eyepieces these make fantastic star-hoppers. I keep all of the original part and I don't drill any new holes in the tube so that I can always put them back in show condition for display, but I always buy these scopes to look through them, not at them. They belong outside collecting starlight, not dust on display somewhere.

 

Wonderful!

I gotta get another door!



#3994 clamchip

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Posted Yesterday, 02:15 PM

My C8 and me taken yesterday, me and my Popp 6 inch Mak from three years ago.

You can see I've lost a few pounds.

Robert

 

IMG_0481.jpg

post-50896-0-04878100-1521941218.jpg


Edited by clamchip, Yesterday, 02:18 PM.

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